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Full text of "The typography of advertisements that pay : how to choose and combine type faces, engravings and all the other mechanical elements of modern advertisement construction"

THE TYPOGRAPHY OF 
ADVERTISEMENTS THAT PAY 



THE TYPOGRAPHY OF 
ADVERTISEMENTS THAT PAY 



HOW TO CHOOSE AND COMBINE TYPE FACES, ENGRAVINGS 

AND ALL THE OTHER MECHANICAL ELEMENTS OF 

MODERN ADVERTISEMENT CONSTRUCTION 



BY 

GILBERT P. FARRAR 




As to methods there may be a million and then some, but 
principles are few. The man who grasps principles can 
successfullj'^ select his own methods. The man who tries 
methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble — 

Harrington Emerson 



D. APPLETON AND COMPANY 

NEW YORK LONDON 

1917 



COPTKIGHT, 1917, BT 

D. APPLETON AND COMPANY 



Printed in the United States of America 



mi- 



^/S^5^ 



THE AUTHOR WISHES TO ACKNOWLEDGE 

HIS APPRECIATION OF THE ASSISTANCE 

GIVEN HIM BY 

PROF. GEORGE BURTON HOTCHKISS 

OF NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 

IN ARRANGING THE MANUSCRIPT 
FOR THIS BOOK 



CONTENTS 



CHAPTER PAGE 

I. IXTRODUCTIOX 1 

II. The Kinds of Advertisements .... 7 

III. Classification of Type Faces .... 39 

IV. The Combination of Type Faces . . .103 
V. Putting the Advertisement Together . . 115 

YI. Making the Message Quick and Sure . . 129 

TIL Pictures and Engravings 147 

Till. Combining Pictures and Type Face3 . . 173 

IX. Borders 193 

X. The Field of Handlettering .... 209 

XL White Space and Margins .... 227 

XII. What Is Emphasis and What Is Not . . 241 

XIII. Striking Effects 249 

XIV. Adding Life to Package Display . . . 271 
XV. Conclusion 279 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

PAGE 

^olian Company 172 

Allen, W. F, Company 258 

Alexander Hamilton Institute 149 

American Woolen Company (Fabric First) . . 266 

Anargyros' Cigarettes, S 30 

Arrow Collars 212 

Auster Tonneau Shield . . . . . . . 160 

Back to Nature (Book) 220 

Banking 76 

Barmann, Peter, Half Stock Ale 202 

Beacon Falls Leather Top Shoes 180 

Berkey & Gay Furniture 110 

Ben Day (The Thinking Hand) 166 

Blackmer, E. K 83 

Blaisdell Paper Pencil 220 

Book of Knowledge, The 106 

Brodnax, Geo. T., Inc 32 

Burnett's Vanilla 162 

Burlington Watch 92 

Bussey's Gold Coin Stoves 40 

Campbell's Soups 28 

Carborundum 268 

Carmen Complexion Powder 92 

Champion Spark Plug 136-137 

Coe 's Wrenches 150 

Colgate's Shaving Stick (Package) .... 274 

ix 



X LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

PAGE 

Comptometer, The 218 

Conard & Jones Roses 30 

Corning Cornophore 46 

Crane's Linen Lawn 20 

Creange & Walter 171 

Crescent Brass & Pin Co 265 

Crow-Elkhart Motor Car 142-143 

Damascus Safety Pins 14 

Dioxogen 274 

Djer-Kiss 210 

Dobbs & Company 213 

Dodge Brothers Motor Car 179 

Duofold Underwear 132 

Dupont Fabrikoid Company 262 

Eastman Kodak Company 112 

Emerson Player Piano 252 

Flexatile Asphalt Shingles 255 

Flint & Horner 86 

Forest Home Farm Hams 256 

Fox Gun 118, 119-120-121 

Gano-Downs 85 

General Electric Company 174 

Gillette Safety Razor 190 

Gillette Decollete 182-183 

Goodyear Lawn Hose 44 

Golden Star Polish 30 

Gold Seal Champagne 276 

Gorham Silverware . . 168 

Gregory, J. J. H., & Son 228 

Gulden's Mustard 262 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS xi 



PAGE 



'^H. & H." Steel Lockers 116 

The Hal Motor Car .207 

Hammermill Bond 1^^ 

Hampton Shops 108 

Hercules Stump Pullers 25G 

H. O. (cereal) 252 

Hotel Sherman 200 

Richard Hudnut (Violet Sec Toilet Water) . . 197 

Hudson Motor Car 57 

Hygeic Ice 1^^ 

Indian Head 206 

Inland Printer Company 270 

Iowa Seed Company 256 

Iron Clad Hosiery 1^8 

Jeffery Motor Car 22 

K., N. & K. Travelers' Checks . . . . . . 69 

Kansas City Electric Light Company . . .256 

Kawnear Store Fronts 235 

Kelly-Springfield Tires 29 

Klearflax Linen Rugs 156 

Kleinert 's Garment Shield 191 

Kolynos Company, The 18 

La Preferencia Cigars 214 

Liberty Paper Company 35 

Lisk Self-Basting Roaster 138 

Listerine 239 

Listerine (Package) 274 

Lowney's Chocolates 24 

Lowney's Cocoa ......... 67 

Lucas Paints 244 



xii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

PAGE 

Macy, R. H., & Company 36 

Marchant, Geo. F., Company 229 

McKay Ventilated Table Pad 158 

Miller Tires 242 

Monroe Pharmaeal Company 262 

Mott, The J. L., Iron Works 19 

Mutual Motors Company, The 72 

National Fireproofing Company 265 

Neolin Soles 52 

New York Telephone Company 16 

Nujol (Package) 272 

Odo-ro-no 198 

Oriole Go-Basket 194 

P. & G. Naphtha Soap . 246 

Packard Trucks 62 

Packer's Tar Soap 23 

Parfum Lilas de Rigaud 82 

Paris Garters 204 

Pep-o-mint Life Savers (Package) 272 

Phoenix Silk Hose 164 

Pneu-Form Dress Form 196 

Pompeian Olive Oil 264 

Pond's Vanishing Cream 232 

Quaker Oats 13 

Rameses Cigarettes 58 

Riz la + Cigarette Papers 186 

Roamer Motor Car, The 178 

Ronald Press 34 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS xiii 



PAGE 



Royal Baking Powder 216 

Roj^al Baking Powder (Boy and Cake) . . .152 

Ryzon (Package) 272 

Salisbury Wheels 222 

*' San Moritz" Sweater, The 107 

Santa Fe Railroad, The 215 

Sears, Roebuck & Company 201 

Seedtape 242 

Simonson, A 225 

Smith Brothers (Package) 272 

Southern Cypress Mfrs. Assn 224 

Starr & Reed Egyptian Cigarettes .... 260 

Stewart Pencil Sharpener 250 

Straus, S. W., & Company 87 

Stromberg Carburetor 30 

Swift & Company 154 

Tecla Pearls '79 

Thermos Bottle 234 

Tom Moore Cigars 236 

Trenton Potteries Company, The . . . 144-145 

United Steel Company, The 254 

Universal Portland Cement Company . . .176 

Valentine's Valspar 148 

Vignette Halftone (Substitute for) .... 148 

Waltham Watch Company 230 

Wellington Pipe 184 

Whitall Tatum 12 

White Horse Scotch Whiskey 161 



xTi SPECIMEN TYPE FACES 

PAGE 



. . . 98 
Post qq 

Post Condensed 



Scotch Roman ^^ 

Scotch Roman Italic ^^ 

AVebb ; ^5 

Winchell 



THE TYPOGRAPHY OF 
ADVERTISEMENTS THAT PAY 



THE TYPOGRAPHY OF 
ADVERTISEMENTS THAT PAY 

CHAPTER I 

INTRODUCTION 

Good advertising is something more than mere typography, 
but good tj'pography makes good advertising more effective. 

Ernest Elmo Calkins. 

Every advertiser has one or more reasons for 
the expenditure of money for publicity purposes. 
Plans are laid with these reasons as a basis. The 
style of advertisement to be used is determined 
by the plan, and the style of advertisement de- 
termines the kind of copy, illustrations, and type 
faces to be used, as well as the arrangement of 
these. 

Can the dress of an advertisement be so planned 
that when worked out by the many skilled hands 
it will produce the effect which the planner of 
the advertisement knows will sell the goods? 

Architects, engineers, and builders in other 
lines of human endeavor bring about this condi- 
tion in their work. Why doesn't the advertise- 
ment builder build just as easily? 

1 



2 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

Architects and engineers have a code of prin- 
ciples; they know the capacities and limitations 
of the men and materials with which they build. 

While nearly all builders of advertisements 
know their principles, few have any practical 
knowledge of the materials with which they work 
— their possibilities and their limitations. 

This is not wholly the fault of builders of ad- 
vertisements. They have had few guide posts. 

Practically every book on general advertising 
principles ignores the subject of engravings, type, 
etc. ; or if perchance any mention is made, the com- 
ment is very perfunctory and of small practical 
value to the advertisement builder. 

There are practically no books on engraving 
methods ; certainly none that begin to enumerate 
the possibilities of the various styles of engrav- 
ings as applied to advertisement construction. 

Books on type are more or less catalogues of 
type faces only, and they seldom attempt to aid 
the builder of advertisements with suggestions of 
where and how the type faces shown are best 
suited to various selling plans. 

The growth of advertising as a specialized and 
standardized business has been phenomenal. But 
printing and the kindred arts have not kept pace. 
Such progress as has been made has been forced 



INTRODUCTION 3 

upon the printing craft. Printers have been led, 
and almost coerced, into handling the increased 
business due to the advertisement builder's imagi- 
nation. 

The printer is, first of all, a mechanic in a busi- 
ness filled with voluminous detail. The advertise- 
ment builder should not expect the printer or 
the engraver to be able to give him what he 
should have unless he speaks the printer's lan- 
guage — speaks to him in his own technical terms — 
knows the materials with which the printer works, 
and can call for what he wants. The advertise- 
ment builder should call for what he needs from 
a sales standpoint. The average printer bases his 
choice of type faces on mechanical principles. 

The advertisement builder does not necessarily 
need to know which side of the type has a ''nick," 
or why a printer puts water on type before he 
distributes it back into the cases. He should, how- 
ever, know by their technical names what type 
faces, rules and engravings will produce the 
proper sales effect when put together ; which types 
are adapted for the various styles of advertise- 
ments and which types are used to convey the 
various sales effects desired. 

Few architects could swing a trowel or wipe the 
joint of a lead pipe with any practical success, yet 



4 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

practically all architects can "talk shop'' with 
every mechanic on the job. 

When an architect decides that a certain style 
of building is just the thing for the problem in 
hand, he knows almost immediately what kind of 
roof and floors are the best adapted for that par- 
ticular style of building. He also knows which 
make of the certain kind comes nearest to the 
price he has allowed in estimating the cost. 

Different type faces and engravings express and 
suggest different things in themselves. Every 
mechanical detail of the appearance of well-built 
advertisements lends force and attraction to the 
messages they carry. These mechanical details 
are chosen and determined by the plan which was 
selected as the best method of making the adver- 
tiser's publicity profitable. 

"How, then, do you account for all the wonder- 
ful advertisements of the present?" is a logical 
question. 

Some of these are built by men who have spent 
many hours, days and years in formulating a code 
of mechanical principles; others are accidental 
examples; and still others are sinking funds for 
vast amounts of money. 

This latter class are built, pulled apart, and 
rebuilt several times, because the advertisement 



INTRODUCTION 5 

builder does not have a clear idea of the kind of 
advertisement he should build and how it should 
look when finished ; or if he has this clear-cut 
vision he does not call upon the printer in tech- 
nical terms which will produce this finished re- 
sult. 

I know of several cases where $100 has been 
spent in trying to get a set-up that conveyed the 
proper idea of the sales plan to the reader of the 
advertisement ; and even then the results were not 
satisfactory from a sales standpoint. 

Too much time, energ}^ and money is now being 
wasted owing to a dearth of practical workable 
knowledge on the subject of advertisement con- 
struction from a mechanical standpoint. 

A series of articles in Printers^ Ink by the 
writer, on the subject of Typographical Display, 
brought numerous requests for a reference book 
on this subject. 

Here it is. 

I have endeavored to lay down principles and 
sound scientific rules of practice for the satisfac- 
tory and economical production of advertisements 
that will sell goods. 

Every advertisement partakes of one or more 
styles. All advertisements can be classified for 
easy reference. This I have tried to do. 



6 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

The advertisements shown in this book have 
been selected for their display features only. The 
author does not attempt to consider the copy in 
the examples. 

There are only a few type faces with which the 
advertisement builder need be familiar. I have 
tried to show what these are and where and how 
they can be used in each or several of the styles 
of advertisements. 

Styles change, principles seldom change, and 
human nature hardly ever changes. 

If my book helps in any manner toward produc- 
ing a better understanding and appreciation be- 
tween the builder of advertisements and the men 
who actually put the advertisement together, it 
will have accomplished its main object. 



CHAPTER II 

THE KINDS OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

Advertising is a modern means of selling. The 
broadest and most used kind of advertising is 
selling by means of the printed word. This book 
deals with the construction of advertisements in 
magazines and newspapers. Such being the case, 
it deals with only a division of the printed word 
as a means of selling. 

Every successful salesman has a method of 
approach. Every successful advertisement must 
have a method of approach, and this method must 
be based on answers to the many questions which 
arise between the time a person decides to spend 
money for advertising and the time the advertise- 
ment is built. 

Every advertisement is a story — a sales story. 
It tells something that should produce a buying 
impulse in the mind of the reader (either imme- 
diately or eventually) or it tells something that is 
conducive to a better feeling and understanding 
between the advertiser and the reader. In the 

7 



8 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

final analj^sis advertising is educational — educa- 
tion toward immediate sales, or education toward 
good will — future sales. 

If the advertiser has a universally used article 
and wishes to reach all the readers of a publica- 
tion he will use the Forceful Educational style. 
This style has the gist of the story in the headings 
or pictures, or both. The reader gets the com- 
plete story in the headings. The rest of the ad- 
vertisement gives simply the details. 

There are many articles that are bought by the 
more substantial and intelligent readers only. 
Such readers do not need to be forced into read- 
ing a story. They read for information and there- 
fore read the whole story or they do not read 
any of it. 

This appeal must be concise, refined and thor- 
ough. It is best obtained by the use of the Passive 
Educational style which has no strong headlines 
and very little contrast — just a plain statement of 
facts. 

If the advertiser wishes to reinforce the mes- 
sage with a reflection of the age and reliability of 
his firm, or if the message needs the flavor of a 
certain period in history, then the Handlettered 
style is best. The possibilities of a message let- 
tered by hand, instead of set in type, with the il- 



THE KINDS OF ADVERTISEMENTS 9 

lustrations drawn to conform, are unlimited as a 
means of expression. 

Perhaps the advertiser has passed the educa- 
tional period in the firm's advertising; his mes- 
sage simply needs the reiteration of the trade 
name in connection Vv^itli a suggestive picture (or 
sometimes without the picture). Then the Poster 
style is best. Cream of Wheat and Old Dutch 
Cleanser advertisements are usually of the Poster 
style. 

Many firms create a trade character or a comic 
as a means of making the trade name more easily 
remembered. Velvet Joe and the Campbell's Soup 
Kid are examples. The use of such a character 
makes the Forceful Educational style still more 
forceful and causes the copy to partake of the 
Character style. 

There are a number of manufacturers and mer- 
chants who have a forceful educational story to 
tell, but the size of their business, or the profit on 
the goods advertised, does not permit the use of 
large space — double pages, full pages, half pages, 
or even quarter pages. 

For these there is the Small Space style of ad- 
vertisement. Here the idea is to get some kind 
of an odd shape in order to have the small space 
get attention when placed on a page with many 



10 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

other advertisements. This should be done even 
if it is necessary to make the copy extremely brief. 

Oftentimes a Small Space advertisement is 
also a Mail Order advertisement. The relation 
is close. 

Advertisers of jewelry, books and other special- 
ties often deal direct with the reader and in such 
cases it is necessary that the story be longer and 
more explicit than a purely educational story. 
The style of advertising, which is known as the 
Mail Order style, must bring back to the adver- 
tiser several dollars for every one spent in ad- 
vertising. This being the case, there are few ad- 
vertisements of this style which occupy full pages. 
Therefore, it is necessary that the Mail Order 
style be as forceful as possible and at the same 
time contain more story than the purely educa- 
tional style. In order to accomplish both objects 
the method most widely used is to get extremely 
forceful headings which tell the story, and use 
these in connection with very small body reading 
matter. 

Department store advertising is educational, 
but it is slightly different from the pure educa- 
tional style and for that reason it should be classi- 
fied as the Department Store style. 

This, then, gives us eight general groups or 



THE KINDS OF ADVERTISEMENTS 11 

styles for classifying the kinds of advertisements, 
namely : 

The Forceful Educational 

The Passive Educational 

The Handlettered 

The Poster 

The Character and Comic 

The Small Space 

The Mail Order 

The Department Store. 

Some rare advertisements partake of two of 
these kinds, and are excellent pieces of construc- 
tion. Yet those which partake of two or more 
of the kinds noted above are seldom maximum 
sales producers. 

This book does not comment on colored adver- 
tisements because the fact that an advertisement 
is in color does not alter its classification. 



THE FORCEFUL EDUCATIONAL 

This style is well shown by the Whitall Ta- 
tum and the Quaker Oats advertisements. 

The main point in the construction of advertise- 
ments of this style is that the headlines and sub- 
headlines, either with or without the pictures. 




Prof. 

Anderson's 

Supper 

Which Millions 
Have Adopted 



□led a way to exp^o^ 



Prof. A. P Anderson, the expert on loo 
food cells in grain. 

Each wheat or rice grain contains millions of food cells, which should 
be broken to digest. Cooking breaks but part of .them. He wanted 
all the food cells broken, to make every atom feed. 

So he steam-exploded grains of wheat and rice. He puffed them to 
eight times normal size. Whole grains were thus made wholly dizestible. 
And the world obtained ideal grain foods. 

They are Like Bubbles 

Purted Wheat and Purted Rice are like bubbles. They aie airy, ««ky 
crisp and porous. The flavor and form are delightful. 

Of course, they are breakfast dainties. They are served with cream 
and sugar, or mixed with any fruit. No other morsels half so choice 
are found on morning tables. 

But they are supper tit-bits too. In millions of bowls of milk or cream 
they are served in place of bread. 

These are ideal good-night dishes. They are whole grams, with all 
the whole-grain elements. They easily and completely digest. And the»r 
toasted, fragile crispaess makes them fascinating foods. 

You will not let a day pass without them when yo^i learn how 
people like them. 



Puffed 


Puffed 


Wheat 


Rice 


and Corn Puffs 


Each 15c Except in Far West 



Like Nuts 

The fearful heat gives Puffed Grains a taste like toasted imts. They 
are often used like nut meats. Folks use them in candy making, and a^ 
garnish for ice cream. Mothers douse them -with melted buner for 
the children to eat at play. 

Puffed Wheat, Puffed Rice and Corn Puffs all taste like confections. 
But xMa flavor differs vastly. You should serve them all. Keep a package 
ot each on the pantry shelf so your people may have a variety. 

The Quaker OdfsOmpany 

Sole Makers vuai 




DAMASCUS 

SteelSafetyPins 
For Dress Use 

HANDSOMELY made and 
shaped, with sriff 
. needle-sharp points 
that pierce the thickest fabric 
without bending or hT)oking. 
Flat safety shield lies close to 
fabric, protects point and pre- 
vents accidental unclasping. 
The coil end neatly sheathed 
to prevent tangling, 
Damascus is made in 6 sizes, pol- 
ished to perfect smoothness. Your 
choice of Nickel, Black or Gold 
Finishes. 

Always look for the Oakville 
Trade Mark on every card 
or paper of pins you buy. 

Oakville Company 

Waterbury, Conn. 




THE KINDS OF ADVERTISEMENTS 15 

tell the story. Sometimes the headlines tell an 
abstract story connecting in thought the article 
and the everyday life of the reader. 

The headlines must, therefore, stand out of the 
advertisement. To do this there must he contrast 
between the headlines and the rest of the adver- 
tisement. The greatest weakness among adver- 
tisements of this style is that there is not enough 
contrast. The headlines are either not strong 
enough or the rest of advertisement is set in type 
so dark that it weakens the force of the head- 
lines. 

Of course, there are times when full force is 
not desired. Such a dainty and attractive illus- 
tration as that shown in the Damascus Safety 
Pin advertisement would be cheapened by any 
stronger contrast. 

This advertisement is a pioneer of a style that 
is sure to be widely used — one series of a tj^e 
face used with an illustration of the same tone of 
color as the type face. 

It is also possible to restrain the force of the 
Forceful Educational style in advertisements that 
have no illustrations. This is well shown by the 
New York Telephone advertisement, which uses 
type faces that are all of one family. 



Corred TELEPHONE Habits 

'Bring you better Telephone Service 

1 HE foltdving lu^esdoni are publiihed at the request xA 
% numbcrof large business houses that are interested in de- 
rrleping pictsing telephone manner* among their employees: 



On all 

Outgoing Calls 

Always look in the telephone book 
to malt surt you call the right num- 
ber. If you do not find the number 
in the book, ask "In/brmation." 

KjMA.yournumbtrvn^ a slight pause 
between the hundreds and the tens. 
For cjfample, in calling ^'Barclay 
U 63, "$ay,"Baf clay Oft* Two (pause) 
Six Three." 

Speak clt»rly and cUttinetly, dirediy 
into the transmitter. 

JLlSTEN to the operator's repttition 
of the number and acknowledge it. 

Hold //^ lint until your-party an- 
swen a:nd then give your whole atten- 
tion to che telephone convenation. 

To RECAJ.L the operator, move the 
receiver hook up and down slowly. 

When you have finished ulking, 
say "Good-bye" and replace the re- 
ceiver on the hook. 

Remember, courtesy over the tele- 
phohe is always desirable. It wins 
Friends for you and your company. 



Otrall 

Incoming Calls 

Answer your telephone promptly 
and pleasantly: 

ANNOUNCEyournameand the name 
ofyourdepartment. Don't say "Hejlo." 

Be ready with pad and pencil in 
order not to keep your caller watting. 

If you require help ^^ handling the 
call properly, get it at once or poHtely 
transfer the call to the employee who 
can best handle it. 

If you answer for another em- 
ployee, offer to take the message, then 
call it to- (he othcr'f attentiou at the 
first opportunity. 

Listen attentively, so that you will • 
not have to annoy the caller by ask- 
ing him to repeat. 

Remember, abruptness or indiffer- 
ence drives away trade. Close atten- 
tion U) telephone orders helps win it. 

Maintain the same courtesy and 
consideration in a telephone conver- 
sation that you would with your cus- 
tomer face to race. 



The voice with the smile wins 



NEW YORK TELEPHONE COMPANY 

C»rd rtfrtdiuiun tfikdthvi tdvtriuimni mty h sicurei m tppluni»» litKrnttriu cmturcist tfei 



THE KINDS OF ADVERTISEMENTS 17 

While the Damascus Safety Pin and New York 
Telephone advertisements are not as forceful as 
the Whitall Tatum or the Quaker Oats advertise- 
ments they are nevertheless known as Forceful 
Educational. There is contrast— restrained con- 
trast—between the headlines and the rest of the 
advertisement even if the style of type is the 
same. This style has found much favor with ad- 
vertisers because of the restraint, which is usu- 
ally more dignified. It is used by banking insti- 
tutions and public service corporations where 
more dignity is desired and yet some contrast is 
needed. 

THE PASSIVE EDUCATIONAL STYLE 

Sometimes it is not good judgment to use the 
Forceful Educational style because the whole 
story or not any part of it must be read to be of 
value to the advertiser. 

When there are no headlines the reader reads 
the entire advertisement or he does not read any 
part of it, and this very fact causes the copy to 
get a reading from the better class of readers. 

This style is what I like to call the Passive Edu- 
cational style; not because I think it is weak in 
value to the advertiser, but because it usually is 
so quiet and clean-looking. 




g 






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latest examples of plumb- 
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pnces. Mailed for 4cpostage. 



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Another new Mott fixture is the 
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THE J. L. MOTT IRON 

Fifth Avenue and 17th Street 

Mli—Eighly-nine Years oj Supremacy — 1917 

tBoston Seattle Portland, Ore. 

Pittsburgh Cleveland tWashington, D. C. 

fChicago .r^— -:. ^ . .■? „ ^ 

Minneapolis 



Cleveland 
t Detroit 
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New Orleans 
Denver 



iShotvrooms equipped toith model bathrooms 



WORKS 

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^H 



iT^Wr^JMWr^^t^M^A^AV^TV^ Wr^ 




1 



JncGifr 

thau surc^ to please any girl or 
<r^: any woman j^^^ 

^Mo{htr 
n)aughtcr 

Sister 
S'wcc/hcart 

"Tritnd 






dh 



\s a rtaiiy ^( 
a rea^ 



er in 



rood writing pap 
lljJftautijulhayL , 

Qrane's 
d^nencQwn 

put up in boxes designed by ma/Ur artj/k V> Eir- 
nish an appropriaujctiing for ihis exquisite paper, 
oflers tticperfict gift in iu «a/ Christmas spirit 

Eaton, Crane (25 Pike Co. 



New York 



Piftsficld.Ma5s. 



\!tc:30t:ii^:ss:s^ 



cAwMT'StJ <^*JJ »f7f»n0rT<n^*ni»*l>*tifie *lixp$iuUm . 



r" •■'■■■ "■'• 



lu^eXXX 



J 



THE KINDS OF ADVERTISEMENTS 21 

The Kolynos copy shows this Passive Educa- 
tional style without an illustration and The J. L. 
Mott Iron Works copy shows this style with 
an illustration. More examples of this style are 
shown in other chapters of this book. 



THE HANDLETTERED STYLE 

Handlettering is flexible, and therefore char- 
acter, beauty, dignity, age or reliability are best 
exemplified through its use. 

Nothing is so in keeping with its audience and 
at the same time so typical of the age and char- 
acter in the product as the advertisement of 
Crane's Linen Lawn. 

Of course there are limits and pitfalls in the 
use of handlettered advertisements as in all other 
styles of advertisements. It can be overdone and 
it is not often that you find as much copy as well 
handled with handlettering as is shown in the 
Crane's Linen Lawn advertisement. 

The Jeffery advertisement has nearly as much 
copy as the Crane advertisement, but note the 
difference. This helps to prove that a clean type 
face would be far more useful in many cases than 
the more expensive handlettering. 



The 



COMBINING 

WINTER LUXURY WITH 

SUMMER COMFORT 

(The toJ> is removable) 



Price 
complete 



^1165 



lill 



^ 



THRU PASSENGER ROADSTER., $lO0O 



ricture to yourself a tiandsome, 

hi0i-grade,beautifuUyr-fiiushed, luxuxiously easy-riding endosed 
coadi— put as mu^ quality into your picture as you can— and you 
still win not beoverestixnatiagtlie quality- and appearance of thejeaery 
Four Sedan. CHlet die cost of diis car complete is extremely mod- 
erate— and diie Sedan body is easily zemoved» giving you an open 
tourmg car including summer top for pleasant-weather touring. 

ttwl«d ftont seats agon l easy access from the front compartment to the tonneau ■ 'Wlixlows, eama ■wide, 
three- stxtee nth InA crystal piate. tround and polished, a<»isable far venalaiion • Cmtana.silk portiae type — 

Upholstery, grey wUpcord-Jeaiber optkmalfor seats • Interior iUumlnation bom an electric done light. 

»— .«a.««.w«^ The Thomas B. Jeffery Company 

Main Office and Works • Kenosha, W&xoso' n-o^w*!..™,- 




Is a friend which will tell her the truth about 
her hair 

If it discloses heavy, lustrous tresses of a rich 
sheen and dainty fluffiness — she should be 
thankful — and preserve their beauty by using 
as pure and dependable a shampooing agent as 
can be obtained— Packer's Tar Soap. 

If, on the other hand, her mirror reveals a scanty 
growth of stringy, dull-looking locks, it behooves her 
to cultivate forthwith the friend of scalp health and 
hair health— Packer's Tar Soap. 

Packer's Tar Soap is the shampoo ideal. Its pine tar, 
pure vegetable oils and glycerine combine the cleansing 
and soothing properties that modern life make necessary 
for the proper care pf the hair. Send 10c for sample. 

Our Manual— ''The Hair and Scalp- 
Modern Care and Treatment, ' ' 3b pages oj 
practical information, sent free on request. 

Packer's Liquid Tar Soap— cleanses the hair and scalp delight- 
fully Delicately perfumed. Liberal sample of liquid, 10c. 

THE PACKER MFG. CO. 

DEPT 86-E, 81 FULTON ST.. NEW YORK ^^--=^ 




Pure as the Pines 



194 December Good Housekeeping 



THE KINDS OF ADVERTISEMENTS 25 

Not all artists are good letterers and few of 
the good ones can get the spirit of the copy in the 
lettering. This makes handlettering a decidedly- 
delicate and difficult problem to handle. 

It is, however, well to remember that the fewer 
handlettered lines in an advertisement the bet- 
ter. Note the Packers' Tar Soap example. This 
advertisement is really a restrained Forceful 
Educational advertisement similar to the Nev/ 
York Telephone example. 

Other phases of this interesting means of dis- 
play will be discussed in the chapter on Handlet- 
tering. 



THE POSTER STYLE 

The next style of advertisements is the Poster 
style. Practically all poster advertisements are 
handlettered and that is why the classification 
follows in this order. Such advertisements as 
Lowney's are poster advertisements because of 
the few words and large picture. This is identi- 
cal in style to the poster painted on a wall or 
printed and pasted on a board. 

^^ Cream of Wheat" and ''Old Dutch Cleanser" 
are two very well-known examples of the Poster 
style. 



THE KINDS OF ADVERTISEMENTS 27 

THE CHARACTER AND COMIC 

The next classification is naturally the Charac- 
ter and Comic style. These are simply Forceful 
Educational advertisements made more forceful 
and at the same time making for quick identifica- 
tion by using the same character picture in all 
the advertisements. 

Two well-known characters are Velvet Joe and 
the Campbell's Soup Kid. 

Some time ago I ran across the Kelly-Spring- 
field Tire advertisement, which has since appealed 
to me as about the best adaptation of the comic 
style of advertisement that I have ever seen. It 
is catchy in technique and also has the product 
tied up securely to the picture at first glance. 

One does not have to stretch the imagination to 
get the connection. If comics do not fit naturally, 
do not try to make them fit. They are either the 
thing or nothing and for only a few products can 
they be used without making the advertisement 
too much comic and not enough product. 

THE SMALL SPACE STYLE 

As a test of real ability in advertisement build- 
ing, nothing is as good as the small space adver- 
tisement. 




"We pick them 
for youl" 

All these fresh delicious vegetables 
we select as carefully as if they were 
intended for one table alone — and 
that one, yours. You could spend all 
day m marketing, and another day 
in preparing and cooking what you 
buy, yet not produce such a perfectly- 
balanced food-combination as 



CampbelFs Vegetable Soup 

It combines appetinng flavor with wholesome amd substantial nourishment. 

Think of fifteen different vegetables in one soup! Selected white potatoes from Maine, 
the best Jersey "sweets," fine rutabaga turnips from Canada, choice carrots of the French 
type — Chantenay, succulent green okra, "baby" lima beans, small peas, tomatoes, celery. 
Dutch cabbage, and tender com are all included in this tempting combination. 

We add rice, barley, a little delicate leek and onion, fresh herbs, fine spices, and just a 
touch of snappy red peppers. And we blend all these with a strong nourishing beef stocky 
and a sprinkling of "alphabet" macaroni. Every ingredient lends its own distinctive quality^ 
of nutrition or pcilatable savor. 

A good soup once a day at least is positively necessary to the pmberly -balanced diet. 

All authorities recognize this fact. 

Why should you ever be without a tzisty and strengtherung soup- 
course — or why should you ever bother with home-made soup — 
when you can always have a supply of this satisfying Campbell "kind" 
at hemd on your pantry shelf? 




Asoararus 


Clam Chowder 


Pea 


B^ ^ 




Pepper Pot 


Bouillon 


Julienne 
Mock TuVie 


Pnntanier 


Celery 


Tomato 


Chicken 


Mulligatawny 


romato-Okra 


Chicken-Gumbo (Okra) 


Mu.t^ 


l-egctablc 


Clam Bouillon 


Ox Tail 


'.'ermicelli-Tomatp 




Put a Kelly-Springfield Gray Tube 
into a tub of water and see it float. 
That proves that the rubber in it is 
real. Put a Kelly-Springfield Gray 
Tube on your car and see it last. 
That provfes that the real rubber has 
been made into a tube by hand. 



Kelly-Springfield lire Company 

corner Broadway & 57* Street New York 




Tbc He«ra Tire ft Kubtxt 
ficriDS Tire & Rubber Co. Houston, Tczai 
Bo&s Rubber Co., Dcover.Cola 
TteOlmtudCo, lnc.,8yr«cu»e. N Y 
South a Hdwe A Woo<i.lock Co , Ltd.. Ne- 
L J Barth,'.Boche»t.r, N V Stiiwt 4 



Atkinson Tire ft Supply Co.. JeckeonvUlt.ria. 
Central Rubber & Supply Co., IndlenapoUa, lei 
CD Franke &Co.. Charle*too,S. C. 
K. & 3. Auto Tire Co., Limited, Toronto. Can. 
Todd Rubber Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Barnard & Micbaal, Buffalo, N Y. 



Keeps Furniture 
Looking New 




Stop Wasting 
Gasoline 
Money! 

Every mile you run 
your car without the 
New Stromberg Car- 
buretor means gasoline 
waste. Its economy 
records on all kinds of 
cars prove it absolutely 
the most economical 
for any car. 

And in speed, accel- 
eration, easy starting 
and power tests it has 
broken world's records. 
Send name, model and 
year of your car for in- 
formation. 

i MOTOR 

OfVlCfS CO. 



1914 Star Rose Cataloe— Free, 
descriltes 360 carefully selected varieties of 
Th* B«(t Boiei tor America. None hut (he very 

of the world's i 
you trouble in selecting. Tells how 
prune, etc. Send for it today. 

CONARD 4 JONES CO. 

HoM Speciatista, Over SOYears' Exptrtente 
Box 127. We»t Prove, Pa 



IT SOCIETY'S NEWEST 

^Tius IS to let tlie readers ofjUDCE 
know about societys newest member— 

SAnargyros SPECIAL 
BRUSH-END Cigarettes 

Ultra- individual, and rather expensive. 

Made entirely hy hand and separately 

wrapped in silver Jail to preserve jresrv 

ness and jlavor j\t cluhs and 

the better stands -23c. 



THE KINDS OF ADVERTISEMENTS 31 

The problem is to get and hold the attention as 
effectively as possible, tell the story and also il- 
lustrate the story whenever possible. 

The Golden Star Polish and Cleaner advertise- 
ment is a perfect small advertisement. It has a 
good heading and a well-applied picture, a show- 
ing of the package and a striking display. The 
feature most responsible for the attention-rivet- 
ing effect of this advertisement is the circle. 

In small space advertisements it is imperative 
that we use odd shapes, and few features are more 
effective than the circle. There is a chapter on 
* ' Striking Effects ' ' in this book which gives more 
suggestions for building small advertisements that 
cannot be missed. 

The New Stromberg Carburetor advertisement 
is also an excellent example of a well-handled 
small space advertisement. It shows a good use 
of irregularity, which is an important thing to 
keep in mind w^hen building small space adver- 
tisements. 

The Conard & Jones Co. advertisement will at- 
tract attention because of its odd shape and the 
relatively large and irregular picture of the rose. 
In small advertisements something must be strong 
and dominating or the advertisement will not be 
seen. 




41624 ->ttilin« >iKfr Vonuiira-n 
fit Bi.1 J. . uitMii'a'trcir. n.-tiuL^. 
391S5 -'I Wu Fi«ich Ivory yocJ wim^Hi. corr.H' !■• ^^ ih Wa< k 
M.l,(arlBfu^^„>s.t.^.Uar>/•^rro v.,.in,w >■., i«-lt *3 50. \lt„v, I 
i Icathrr bnrd cas*-, moi .,^rain »f . r ^'^ '>■ '■'" I ''■f<:t J 

. bpl<T.did value. $4-00 buckirt . 



THE KINDS OF ADVERTISEMENTS 33 

The S. Anargyros Cigarette advertisement is 
proof that a certain amount of "class" can be ob- 
tained in small space. Ilandlettering is not out 
of place in small space if there are not too many 
words in the small space. 



THE MAIL ORDER STYLE 

The Geo. T. Brodnax, Inc., advertisement is a 
pure Mail Order style. It asks for an order direct 
from the advertisement, and if this is not possible 
it offers a book showing the complete line. When 
the booklet is received by the prospect it is up to 
the advertiser's follow-up literature to produce an 
order direct from the prospect. 

Eegardless of the amount of reading matter 
and the abundance of pictures in this advertise- 
ment, the success of companies in this advertiser's 
line proves that such advertisements are read 
and answered — mostly by women. 

Yet the success of advertisers selling books in 
magazines like System and Factory proves that 
men also read small type if well handled. 

The Ronald Press advertisement utilizes a large 
amount of small type. This is a Forceful Educa- 
tional advertisement with the Mail Order coupon. 
The story is in the headlines and if the reader is 




550 Pages 
—37 Chapters 

1. The Corporate Form of 
Business Organization 

2. Kinds of Corporation 
Stock 

3. Meetings; the Corporate 
Calendar 

4-5. Books and Records of 
Corporations 

6. Distinctive Corporation 
Accounts 

7. Entries Relating to Stock 
of Original Issue 

8. Entries Relating to Treas- 
ury Stock and Stock of 
Other Companies 

9-10. Dividends and Their 
Entry 

11-13. Incorporating Proprte- 
torshif)i. Manufactur- 
ing and Mining Cor- 
porations, and Part- 
nerships 

H-15. The Nature and Kinds 
of Corporation Bonds 

16. Forms of Bonds 

17. Bond Sales and Entries 
for Them 

lS-19. Handling Bond Inter- 
est, Discounts and 
Premiums 

20-21. Sinking Funds 

22. Redemption of Bonds 

23. Closing the Corporation 
Books 

24-25. Corporate Statements 
27 Corporation Reports 
28. Features of the Different 
Plans of Corporate Con- 
solidation 
29-30 Consolidation by Mer- 
ger and by Lease 

31 Accounting in Connection 
with Holding Companies 

32 Preparing Consolidated 
Balance Sheets and In- 
come Accounts 

33 Reorganization 

34 Receiverships 

35. Receivership and Reoi 
ganization 

36. Receivership and Sale 

37. The Dissolution of Cor 
porations 



Sent For Free Examination 

Corporation 

Accounting 



THE new manual by R. J. 
Bennett, Certified Public Ac- 
countant ; Fellow of the Institute of 
Accountants of the United States. 

The features of corporation law 

which the accountant must understand 
are covered fully, -with an explanation 
of the proper procedure in all such 
matters as holding meetings, issuing 
of bonds, declaring of dividends, etc. 

Corporation accounts and records 

are shown in full detail with forms of 
books, charts, and full treatment of the 
^handling of ordinary and special entries. 

The preparation of reports and 
statements required in corporation 
accounting is explained in full. 

The procedure in consolidations, 

receiverships, reorganizations and dis- 
solutions is fully covered, so that 
when occasion arises the accountant may 
know just how to handle his part of the work. 

Send no Money— Book will be 
Sent for Inspection 

The price of this exhaustive 550-page manual 
of corporation accounting is S3.00 postpaid. 
All copies are subject to fullest examination 
before final acceptance. 

Simply fill out the attached coupon and send 
in your order now. "Corporation Account- 
ing" will be sent you for five days' examina- 
tion, to be kept or returned, just as you may 
decide. 



Ronald Press Company, 24 Vesey 

Please send me a copy of Bennett's "Corpor.ition Account 
ination I will either return the book or remit the price, S 



Full of Specific 
Practical Points 



How to Handle Organization 

Expenses 
Corporation Law which the 

Accountant Must Know 
The Correct Conception of 

Treasury Stock 
Entries for Scrip Dividends 
The Consolidated Balance 

Sheet 
The Corporation Calendar 
What a Corporation Stock 

Certificate Must Show 
Legal Rights of Bond Hold- 
Possibilities of Legal Com- 



Procedure at Corporation 

Meetings 
Dividends and their Entry 

on the Books 
Makiiig the Accounting In- 
vestigation Preliminary to 

a Consolidation 
Ten Accounts commonly used 

in Connection with Capital 

Stock 
How to Close the Books of a 

Corporation 
Entries when Salaries are 

Paid in Stock 
Method of Handling Bond 

Interest Coupons 
Filing the Certi5cate of 

Incorporation 
Incorporating a Partnership 
Detiiled Procedure in Mak- 
ing a Bond Issue 
Two Methods of Entering 

Donations of Stock 

Etc . Etc. 



St., New York 

ng" After five days' 



V:s^ 



O- 5 0) «.® s. Sj:! 01 • V 

« o ?* 3 C « i "" ^^ 
O^ 3(UOo4'2«<0 





8 @ Just a Few of the Wonders in Wonderland ® | 










The Spirit of Christmas 

" Re/ltcled in Thest Lovely T 




Tbc Chi S>mc«U< 

Overcoats for Little Ch&p* 




^j;__lj 



THE KINDS OF ADVERTISEMENTS 37 

interested in the story the headlines tell, he will 
read the details. 

To get a clear-cut idea of the variations of the 
Mail Order style, compare the Brodnax advertise- 
ment, which is a pure Mail Order style, with the 
Eonald Press and Liberty Paper examples. 

The Liberty Paper Company advertisement is 
really a Forceful Educational advertisement with 
a coupon for a direct sale by mail to the reader. 

THE DEPARTMENT STORE STYLE 

Department store advertising is first news and 
then educational. It is news because every store 
has a certain following of readers who watch the 
papers for announcements of bargains. It should 
be educational to the point of giving good reasons 
for the bargains. 

Nearly every department store has its own style 
of advertisement building, and this very fact dis- 
tinguishes it from other stores. A great deal of 
character and distinction can be obtained from the 
proper selection of type for the headings — even 
if it is necessary to buy a special series. 

There is a pretty general opinion, however, that 
variety is an essential element in the construction 
of such advertisements. There must be contrast 



38 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

between text and headings and also contrast be- 
tween prices and text. Panels of odd and varied 
sizes can be made to contrast one with another to 
produce and hold attention. 

The E. H. Macy Co. example is quite well-built 
for a department store advertisement. It is clean, 
interesting to look upon and easy to read. If the 
compositor had been able to use type all of one 
kind and size for the division subheadings, the 
result would have been better. 

Department store advertisement construction 
is one style that can stand being made over into 
the real Forceful Educational style with good 
profit to the advertiser. Comparative prices are 
going out of date. People want facts and reasons 
for buying, and the department store must sooner 
or later give a good reason for bargains. 



CHAPTER III 

CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 

It might be assumed that the profession which had created so 
vast a demand and output would have an expert knowledge of 
the principles which underlie the difficult art of type-designing, 
but the fact Ls that the majority of those whose profession it 
is to plan advertisements are densely ignorant of printing types 
and of the power exercised by intelligent type compositions. 

^ Henry Lewis Bullen. 

If there is a reason for spending money for ad- 
vertising this reason will suggest a method of ap- 
proach. This method of approach will determine 
the style of advertisement to be nsed. If the type 
faces are properly chosen to fit the style of ad- 
vertisement, determined by the approach, the 
advertisement should accomplish its purpose ; pro- 
vided, of course, that the analysis behind the ad- 
vertising campaign and the publications used 
were correct. 

In order to properly instruct the mechanics 
handling the setting of the type, we must call for 
type faces by their proper names. 

I have, therefore, shown in this chapter adver- 
tisements which use proper types for each of the 

39 



Save Money 
On Your Stove 



We save you the $5 to S23 profit the stove dealer 
charges you. Buy direct from the factory — save the middle- 
man's profit, and get a better stove for less money. 
You can seled from our big fadory stock. Shipment prompt; 
freight paid; safe delivery guaranteed. 
A Gold Coin Stove or Range must give you satisfactory service for one whole 
year — or we'll refund your money. It at/// give you splendid service for many years. 

BUSSEY'S 
Gold Coin Stoves and Ranges 

For 59 years, we've been making stoves and ranges. Our ex- 
perience and large output enable us to give you ^(ler stoves at 
lonjoer prices. 

Gold Coin Stoves contain the latest improvements <or saving 
fuel and trouble, and are well made throughout. 

VWrite for our Big Catalog TODAY or call at our Factory 






Ranges 
$25.up 
freight 
paid. 



Befort you buy any stove, be lure to see onr 
stoves and our prices. Figure the savingi Stoves 
are shipped all polished, ready to set up. We set 
them up anywhere in Troy or vicinity, without 
extra cbarjfe. 

If you come to Troy take Oakwood Ave. 
Sycaway car at Union Station and see the bic 
line at our faiflory. 

The Gold Coin Stove Co. 

BUSSEY'S FOUNDRY 
1 6 Oakwood Ave., Troy, N.Y. 



CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 41 

several styles and also specimen pages of the 
actual tj^pe faces. In some cases I have been able 
to show all the sizes that are made in that series. 
In other cases I have shown as many sizes as was 
thought advisable. 

Beside one line of each size on the type speci- 
men pages is a black rule line which shows the 
difference between the size of the face of the type 
and the body of the type. 

In the chapter ^'Putting the Advertisement To- 
gether" I give an outline of type facts for use in 
connection with handling tlie type faces discussed 
in this chapter. 

THE FORCEFUL EDUCATIONAL STYLE 

Contrast is the one point we must keep in mind 
when building this style of advertisement. 

Cheltenham Bold for the headlines and Caslon 
Old Style, as used in the Bussey's Stove example, 
are undoubtedly the best faces of type for this 
style of advertisement. There are types that are 
both bolder and lighter than these, but these seem 
to produce just the proper contrast for force. 

Oftentimes this same effect is produced by 
using the Cheltenham Bold for display lines with 
an old style face similar to that shown in the 
Whitall Tatum advertisement, shown in the pre- 



CHELTENHAM BOLD 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing | The telephonic reception and ( 

of messages locally offers many adva fjUj^g ^f messages locally offers 
ntages over a physical handhng by , , . 

messenger, but these advantages will "^^"y advantages over a physiC 

NOT BE FULLY REAUZED UNLES AL HANDLING BY MESSENG 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages loc | 
ally offers many advantages over a physical handling 
BY MESSENGER, BUT THESE ADVANTAGES 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messag | 
ES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAG 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of | 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MA 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and f i | 
LING OF MESSAGES LOCAL 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic receptio | 

N AND FILING OF ME 

Thirty Point 

The telephonic REC | 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telephONIC 



CASLON OLD STYLE 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filine of messa | The telephonic reception and fil | 
ees locally offers many advantages over a pbys j^^^ ^f messages locally offers man 
ical handling by messencer, but these advanta , i • i i n 

zcs will not be fully realized unless in any ,iv V -advantages over a physical handl 

EN ESTABLISHMENT THERE IS SOME SI ING BY MESSENGER, BUT, 
Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally off I 
ers many advantages over a physical handling by messenger, 
BUT THESE ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE FULL 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of message | 
S LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTA 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of | 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS M 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and fi | 
LING OF MESSAGES LOG 

Tw^enty-Four Point 

The telephonic recep | 
TION AND FILING 

Thirty Point 

The telephONIC | 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telePHO 




"Third Year 

and 

Good as Ever" 



When you buy lawn hose remember that 
you pay for more than just "hcse." You 
are investiiig in hose-service. The hose that 
saves you money on a "price" basis this year 
costs you a new hose next year. That is why thou- 
sandshave invested InGoodyearLawnHose—thehose with the rubberribs. 
Year after year this hose gives the same splendid service. Its super-quality 
means uninterrupted utihty when"on tap"from spring to fall. Its master 
construction insures against the wear and tear that wrecks ordinary hose. 



See the Ribs 



Six durable rubber ribs run the full 
length of Goodyear Hose. These add to 
the "glide," as well as absorb the jars and 

knocks as hose is pulled 

about. They reduce 
friction full 80 per cent. 
And they prevent twist- 
ing and kinking. You 
never have to "un- 
ravel" this hose. 



Quality 
Throughout 




Lawn Hose 



This hose is made of only the livest rub- 
ber and tested braided cotton. Five alter- 
nate plies are cured into one solid unit. 
Cracking and chipping can't happen. The 
hose won't rot when exposed to the elements. 

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, Lawn Hose Dept., Akron, Ohio 

Toranto, Canada London, Englanii Mexico City. Mexico 

Writ* Ut on Anything You Want in Rubber (1685) 



Year-in-and-year-out service proves Good- 
year hose ecoaomy. And service is what ycu 
pay for. 

How to Get It 

You will know Good- 
year Lawn Hose by the 
famous Goodyear trade- 
mark on every foot. 

If your dealer hap- 
pens to be out of Good- 
year Lawn Hose, just 
send us his name. We 
will see that you are 
supplied immediately, 
by express, prepaid. 
Price in fifty-foot 
lengths: Three-quarter-inch. 20 cents a foot; 
five-eighths-inch, 19 cents a foot; one-half- 
inch, 18 cents a foot. 

We recommend the five-eighths- inch. You 
will find iw size and weight best for average 
use. 



OLD STYLE No. 15 AND ITALIC 



Six Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of | 
rr.sssages locally ofTers many advant- 
tLges over a physical handling by mes- 
senger, but these advantages will not 
be fully realized unless in any given 
establishment the work is definitely 
assigned to one or more persons, and 
is handled in a uniform and orderly 
MANNER. WITH A PROPER ARR 

Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and| 
iiling of messages locally offers 
many advantages over a physi- 
cal handling by messenger, but 
these advantages will not be 
fully realized unless in any given 
establishment the work is defi- 
NITELY ASSIGNED TO ONE 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception | 
and fiHng of messages locally 
offers many advantages over 
a physical handling by mes- 
senger, but these advant- 
ages will not be fully real- 
IZED UNLESS IN ANY 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic recep-| 
tion and fiHng of mes- 
sages locally offers 
many advantages over 
a physical handling by 
messenger, but these 
ADVANTAGES WIL 



Six Point 
The telephonic reception and filing of \ 
messages locally offers many advantages 
over a physical handling by messenger, 
but these advantages will not be fully 
realized unless in any given establishment 
the work is definitely assigned to one or 
more persons, and is handled in a uni- 
form and orderly manner. With a proper 
ARRANGEMENT FOR HANDLING 

Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing \ 
of messages locally offers many ad- 
vantages over a physical handling 
by messenger, but these advantages 
will not be fully realized unless in 
any given establishment the work 
is definitely assigned to one or 
MORE PERSONS, AND IS 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and\ 
filing of messages ofers many 
advantages over a physical 
handling by messenger, hut 
these advantages will not be 
fully realized unless in any 
GIVEN ESTABLISHME 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception\ 
and filing of messages 
locally offers many ad- 
vantages over a physical 
handling by messenger, 
hut these advantages will 
NOT BE FULLY RE 




The Double Target Test 

77?^ Only Headlight Glass That Passes It 



The Double Tarert Test U ihe 
lest ot beadiieht efficiency. It is the l>ea test for 
no glare, range and side-lifht. 

Only one headlight glass pass« this test — the 
Corning Conaphore, a new invention manufac- 
tured by the Coraine Glass Works. 

How the Test is Made 

Two targets are placed on ihc road in front of a car 

The first target is 22 inches high and 10 feel 
from the car Tlie second is placed beyond the 
first one, 30 feet from the car It is 4,'i feet high 
and a hortzonial line is drawn across it 42 inches 

The intense beam from fee Coming Conaphore 
tboots over the first target and completely illumi- 
naies the second target below the 42 inch line. 

Other beadUght glasses designed to prevent glare, 
dump the light right injront of the car, completely 
Uhiroinating the first target, but ih/owing only a 
fault light on the second target 

Tiking headlights down may decrease glare, but 
u also decreases range. Tilting wastes your light 

TTic Coming Conaphore dte$ met dump the re- 
flected light in from of the car where it is not needed, 
buishootsitoulinalow,wide,sxrongbeam Iigives 
a SOO-foot range, and ample side-ligbt, with no glare. 
A New Headlight Glass Perfected 
byScienUsts 

The Corning Conaphore has a smooth outer 



surface and a scries of patented horizontal corruga- 2- C«. «^i^ifc« ^«. »« ^•|^^> «k« it^ ttai emmttria* " 

tions and c>-Iinders on the inner face Itbcndsdowo j^ fj^e, f^a^ JlmJk7. •<> rim m* mtth 4nn S mi 

the light rays and shoots them out in a long, intense ■« ^o- »■'»"■ •d^*™* -«th^ eoad.co.L 

beam, never more than 42 Inches above the road, *■ £".'^/.^'^'^*^^^''^;^';;;^.7Sfil^!SJ^ SlJlji 

which has wonderful range and ample side-light, ».d *«!.«. 

but no glare TTie Conaphore gives SOO-foot *■ ^Sil^'i^rjiS.JT^w^ni'^r'"*''''*'*'***'**^ 

range, and ample side-light, with no glare 

In response to a general demand for an efficient Made in Two Kinds o( Glass 

ComingGlassWorksperfccted the Coming Cona- "o*'"'' Glau. Clear GUa Cooaphorei «e equally efi 

phor. Th^CommeGUss Works is Che bre«. STlScS'T^'Sf r,S»'^'"w"3.f'No'^- ^"^ 

manufacturer of technical glass in the worid. It etimiiming bick-eUrtand pc^netntiae log uJ dun. W 

makes most of the signal glass used on American « 
railroads- The facilities, experience and reputation 
of this company are behind ever>' pair of Coming 

Conaphores, .J-^ 

Noviol Glass Causes Light to Pierce Fog ^^^^^ 

Coming Conaphores are made of a new pat- diunrteT oi 

ented glass — Noviol Glass. This is a golden-tint dealer* now 

glass which gives the Corning Conaphore a dis- *" today. 



HI pmrai bcadliehi gUu. All |i 
Prie* LiM 



Noviol Glass causes the beam of bght to pierce 
tog or dust, and eliminates back-glare II makes 
the green along the roadside stand out Noordmary 
headlight glass has these features. Noviol Glass 
is controlled by the Coming Glass Works. 



CORNINGGLASS WORKS 

CONAPHORE SALES DIVISION 
111 Fon« BailduA. MtA St. ud Mad.M« Ar*.. NEW YOlUi OTt 



CORNING CONAPHORE 



CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 47 

ceding chapter, and the Goodyear Lawn Hose ad- 
vertisement shown here. 

Some advertisers use the Caslon Bold for dis- 
play lines in connection with the Caslon Old Style 
for the reading matter, as shown by the Corning 
Glass Works example. This is perhaps better 
harmony, but the contrast between the subhead- 
ings and the reading matter is not as strong as it 
could be, and as it is used in the Bussey's Stove 
example. 

The use of Cheltenham Bold for headlines in 
connection with Cheltenham Old Style for body 
matter produces practically the same effect and 
the same color values as the use of the Caslon 
Bold with Caslon Old Style. 

However, there are some cases when a type for 
body matter that is a trifle heavier than Caslon 
should be used. The Neolin advertisement is one 
of these cases. This advertisement allows suffi- 
cient space around the reading matter to make the 
Cheltenham Wide used look much better than a 
lighter face. 



CASLON BOLD 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of | The telephonic reception and | 

messages locallyofiFers many advantages ^jj^jg ^f messages locally offers 

over a physical handling by messenger, j ^ ^ «u .,:««£ 

^ , ^ _ .,, ,. r ,, many advantages over a physical 

but these advantages will not be fully re ' ^ „ ^^J,^l,^« 

ALIZED UNLESS IN ANY GIVEN HANDLING BY MESSENGE 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages local | 
ly offers many advantages over a physical handling 
BY MESSENGER, BUT THESE ADVANTAGE 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messa | 
GES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADV 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of | 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and | 
FILING OF MESSAGES 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic recept | 
ION AND FILING 

Thirty Point 

The telePHONIC | 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telEPHO I 



CASLON BOLD ITALIC 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of mes | The telephonic reception and filing I 

sages locally offers many advantages over a ^r ^ ^„_ i ii jt j 

,,.,,,,.. , , of messages locally offers many ad 

Physical handltng by messenger, but these 

advantages will not be fully realized unless ^^^tages OVer a physical handling 

IN ANY GIVEN ESTABLISHMENTS BY MESSENGER, BUT THESE 
Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally \ 
offers many advantages over a physical handling by mes 
SENGER, BUT THESE ADVANTAGES WILL NO 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages \ 
LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of \ 
MESSA GES LOCALE Y OFFERS MA 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and fili \ 
NO OF MESSAGES LOCALL 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception \ 
AND FILING OF ME 

Thirty Point 

The telephONIC R \ 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telepHONI I 



CASLON OLD STYLE ITALIC 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filine of messaees h I The telephoTllC recept'lOTl and filing \ 

tally offers man, advantaees over a physical hand ^J- ^^SSageS locally offer S many ad^'O 
line by messenger, but these advantages will not ^ i • i i jr i 

. , . , . ... , antages o^-ver a physical handling b 

be fully reali^d unless in any gtven establishment *=• -^ "^ ° 

THERE IS SOME BUSINESS THAT GAINS ^ MESSENGER, BUT THESE A 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and fling of inessages locally offers many \ 
advantages over a physical handling by messenger, but these advan 
TJGESWILLNOTBE FULLY REALIZED UNLESS 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and Jiliyig of 7nes sages local I \ 
r OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES OVER 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of mess \ 
AGES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filin \ 
G OF MESSAGES LOCAL 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception \ 
AND FILING OF M 

Thirty Point 

The telephonic RE \ 

Thirty-Six Point 

The tekpHONI\ 



CHELTENHAM OLD STYLE 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages I The telephonic receprion and filing | 

locally offers many advantages over a physical ^^ messages locally offers many advan 

handling by messenger, but these advantages . i • i i n- i 

... , , „ 111- lages over a physical handling by mes 
will not be fully realized unless m any given ^ ^ ■' ° ■' 

ESTABUSHMENT THERE IS SOME SENGER. BUT THESE ADVA 
Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally offers many | 
advantages over a physical handling by messenger, but these adva 

NTAGES WILL NOT BE FULLY REALIZED UNLES 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally | 

OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES OVER A PH 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messag | 

ES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADV 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing | 

OF MESSAGES LOCALLY O 

Twenty- Four Point 

The telephonic reception and | 

FILING OF MESSAGES 

Thirty Point 

The telephonic RECE | 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telePHONIC 





n eg] i n 

Better than Leather 



Neolin Soles Save 
Wet-Foot Colds 

The skies are dripping ernd the pavements 
splashing and your leather soles sop 
water up ! 

But why leather soles anyway? Why wet- 
foot colds at ail when Neolin soles are 
waiting for you ? 

Neolin soles, which are waterproof soles 
— winterproof soles — snugfoot soles — 
and better cold protection than woolen 
underwear ! 

Neolin soles which make waterproof qual- 
ity a sole standard — and add a comfort 
standard — a wear standard, and a 
modem appearance standard of their 
own. 

For Neolin soles are flexible and velvet-feel- 
ing soles, broken in from the minute they 
touch your foot. Soles that often double 
sole-wear possibilities for you. Soles 
that hold shoe-shape and shoe-looks 
long after many leather soles have flunked 
and departed. Soles that in ^black or 
white or tan look as modem as they are. 
Soles that save shoe-bills for women £is 
for their husbands and their children. 

Remember: NeSlin is neither rubber nor 
leather, but is a new wear-material. At 
most dealers and shoe repairers. And 
to avoid imitations — mark that mark; 
stamp it on your memory: Deolin — 

— Me trade sumhol for a changelai quality product of 

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company 

Akron, Ohio 



CHELTENHAM WIDE 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of | The telephonic reception and fil | 

messages locally offers many advantages j^g ^f messages locally offers ma 
over a physical handling by messenger, , i • i i 

but these advantages will not be fully re "^ advantages over a physical ha 

ALIZED UNLESS IN ANY GIVEN NDLING BY MESSENGER, BU 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally | 
offers many advantages over a physical handling by me 

SSENGER. BUT THESE ADVANTAGES WILL NOT 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages | 
LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of m | 
ESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MAN 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and fili | 

NG OF MESSAGES LOCALL 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception | 

AND FILING OF MESS 

Thirty Point 

The telephonic REC| 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telePHONIC 



CHELTENHAM OLD STYLE ITALIC 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of mess \ The telephonic reception and filing \ 

ages locally offers many advantages over ap ^j messages locally offers many ado 

hysical handling by messenger, but these ad i • i i ji- i 

.„ \ L r II I- J I ■ antages over a physical handling by 

vantages Will not be fully realized unless m ° '^ ^ a ^ 

ANY GIVEN ESTABLISHMENT TH MESSENGER, BUT THESE A 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally ojffers | 
many advantages over a physical handling by messenger, but th 
ESE ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE FULLY RE A LI 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally \ 
OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES OVER A P 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messa \ 
GES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY AD 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing \ 

OF MESSAGES LOCALLY O 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception and \ 

FILING OF MESSAGES 

Thirty Point 

The telephonic RECE\ 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telephonic RE\ 



CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 55 

If the reader will keep in mind the idea that 
there must be contrast between headlines and 
body matter, and at the same time harmony of 
design in the types used for both, he will be able 
to work out more combinations. 

The Corning Glass Works advertisement uses 
italic type to good advantage, while the Caslon 
Italic for the subheadings in the Hudson adver- 
tisement is not in keeping with the rest of the ad- 
vertisement. 

The chief fault with Forceful Educational ad- 
vertisements is the use of three or more type 
faces, whereas two type faces are sufficient— one 
for bold lines and one for the light-toned read- 
ing matter, both related in design where pos- 
sible. 

Cheltenham Bold for the subheadings in the 
Hudson advertisement would have been just as 
strong, much more pleasing, and in harmony with 
the rest of the type faces used. 

THE PASSIVE EDUCATIONAL STYLE 
The J. L. Mott Iron Works advertisement 
shown in the previous chapter is set in Caslon Old 
Style, which is a good type face for making a 
clean-cut, easy-to-read statement such as is re- 
quired by this class of copy. 



CHELTENHAM BOLD ITALIC 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing \ The telephonic reception and \ 

of message, locally offers many adv f-f-^^ ^f messages locally offer 
antages over a physical handling b , ■ 

t , ,1 J * s many advantages over a pny 

y messenger, but these advantages -^ " w- ^ 

WILL NOT BE FULLY REALIZED SICAL HANDLING BY MESS 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages I 
locally offers many advantages over a physical ha 
NDLING BY MESSENGER, BUT THESE ADVA 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messa I 
GES LOCALE Y OFFERS MANY ADV ANT 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of\ 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS M 

Eighteen Point , 

The telephonic reception and \ 
FILING OF MESSAGES LO 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic receptio\ 

N AND FILING OF M 

Thirty Point 

The telephoNIC RE\ 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telePHOm 



How Hudson Super-Six 
Saved the Six 

A Review of the Crisis in Motordom 

Only engineers knew it, but a year ago a crisis impended in Motor- 
dom. The light-weight Six-long the favorite type-seemed wan- 
ing in popularity. The trend was toward Eights and Twelves- 
It appeared for a time that certain limitations might force the Six 
out of the field. Note how the Super-Six reversed that condition. 



For yeara the Light S'lx was the 
leading type. Hudson was its fore- 
most exponent. 

It was so much smoother than 
former t^-pes that enthusiasts called 
it finality 

But it never fulfilled expecta- 

bration. It won hardly a record. 
About every performance record 
that counted — save a few won by 
held by Foiits. 



motor vibration. And they set out to 
remedy it in a new, mathematical 

In June they applied for a pat- 
ent. In December the patent was 
granted. It gave Hudson control 
of a basic invention which solved 
the problems better than anyone 
had dreamed. 



; -performing all rival < 



Hudson Super-Six. 



Not Like Other 
Sixes 




Rameses. 

A very peculiar 
cigarette. You 
may not like it. 

But be very sure 
that you will 

form a strong and 
definite opinion one 
way or the other. 

The reason for the 
constant changing 
in brands among 
cigarette smokers is 
a certain soft neu- 
trality of flavor 
characteristic of 
most varieties. The 
only variation in placid 
mediocilty is on the box. 

If almost any decent 
brand sat^fies you, you 
probably will not care 
for Rameses, **The 
Aristocrat of Cigarettes." 

But if you are seeking a 
very definite and dis- 
tinctive cigarette, unlike 
others — unforgettable — 
the one cigarette for 
your personal and indi- 
vidual taste— then you 
are conaing to Rameses. 

Soon. 

Remember,Nobody ever 
changes from Rameses. 



STEPHANO BROS., iNa 
Philadelphia 



CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 59 

The fact that the Passive Educational Style of 
advertisement is headingless and stands alone 
often requires a more sturdy type face than Cas- 
lon Old Style, and yet not as strong as the Caslon 
Bold face shown in the Rameses cigarette exam- 
ple. In cases of this kind I use Bookman Old 
Style, which is an excellent type face of uniform 
color — neither too bold nor too light. 

Cheltenham Medium is a trifle heavier than 
Bookman and can be used for the same purposes. 
Some readers do not like the roundness of the 
Bookman letters. They want a more pointed 
type. Then I suggest Scotch Roman, which is 
shown in the Packard example. 

Both the Bookman and the Scotch Roman have 
a sturdy dignity that is very pleasing to men. 

When Bookman is unobtainable use Chelten- 
ham Wide, which is similar. When Scotch 
Roman is unobtainable use Bodoni; Scotch Ro- 
man is so similar to Bodoni that i have often 
used it wdth Bodoni Bold for display because of 
the lack of another suitable bold letter to \/ork 
with the Scotch Roman. 

The Kolynos advertisement shown in the pre- 
ceding chapter is set in Bodoni Bold which is 
about as bold as any Passive Educational adver- 
tisement should be set. 



BOOKMAN OLD STYLE 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing | The telephonic reception and fil | 

of messages locally offers many adva j^g q^ messages locally offers ma 

ntages over a physical handling by , ^ , • i 

. , , ^ . ny advantaeres over a physical 

messenger, but these advantages wi -^ ^ t- j 

LL NOT BE FULLY REALIZED UN HANDLING BY MESSENGER 
Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally | 
offers many advantages over a physical handling by mes 
SENGER, BUT THESE ADVANTAGES WILL NO 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages | 
LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGE 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of | 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MA 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and | 
FILING OF MESSAGES L 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic race | 
FTION AND FILI 

Thirty Point 

The telephonic RE| 

Thirty-Six Point 

The TelEPHOI 



CHELTENHAM MEDIUM 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of | The telephonic reception and I 

messages locally offers many advantages filing of messages locally offers 

over a physical handling by messenger, j i, _ ^ „ ^i,.,„: 

, . .„ , , , „ many advantages over a physi- 

but these advantages will not be fully / ° n/iirccr 

REALIZED UNLESS IN ANY GIVEN CAL HANDLING BY MESSE 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally | 
offers many advantages over a physical handling by 
MESSENGER, BUT THESE ADVANTAGES WILL 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages | 
LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of { 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and fil | 
ING OF MESSAGES LOCALLY 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception! 
AND FILING OF MESSA 

Thirty Point ^^ 

The telepHONIC RE | 

Thirty-Six Point 

The TelePHONI 



^ ^ 






isii^iitll 



The "little fellow"-as well 
the big business man— finds 
Packard silent, chainless trucks 

the cheapest to own and operate. Built 
in seven sizes, with fifty body types to 
choose from, the Packard line alone 
offers the one economical truck for 
every hauling task. Shock-proof design 
makes them ten year investments. 
Their improved motors get more power, 
even from low-test gasoline. Worm- 
drive uses all this power, cuts up-keep, 
saves wear and tear. Fitness! Econ- 
omy! Ask the man who owns one. 



SCOTCH ROMAN 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing | The telephonic reception and | 
of messages locally offers many advan ^jj^^g ^f messages locally offers 
tages over a physical handling by mes j i. u • i 

senger. but these advantages will not "^^"^ advantages over a physical 
BE FULLY REALIZED UNLESS IN HANDLING BY MESSENGE 
Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally off | 
ers many advantages over a physical handling by messenger, 
BUT THESE ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE FULLY 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and fihng of messag | 
ES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVA 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of | 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and | 
FILING OF MESSAGES L 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic recepti | 
ON AND FILING O 

Thirty Point 

The TelEPHONI | 

Thirty-Six Point 

The TelEPHO 



SCOTCH ROMAN ITALIC^ 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing \ The telephonic reception and filing \ 

of messages locally offers many adva ^y ^gggages locally offers many ad 
ntages over a physical handling by i • j i 7j- 

messenger, but these advantages trill vantages over a physical handling 

NOT BE FULLY REALIZED UNLE BY MESSENGER, BUT THE 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and JiUng of messages locally offers \ 
many advantages over a physical handling hy messenger, hut the 
SB ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE FULLY REALIZED 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic i^eception and jiUng of messages \ 
LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANT 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing' of\ 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFE 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and \ 
FILING OF MESSAGE 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic recepti \ 
ON AND FILING 

Thirty Point 

The telepHONIC \ 

Thirty-Six Point 

ThetelepHON\ 



CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 65 

Bodoni is made in what is known as a family 
as well as in series. A family is a variation of 
the same design of letter, such as Bodoni, Bodoni 
Bold, Bodoni Italic, Bodoni Bold Italic, etc. Chel- 
tenham is made in a family — the largest type 
family ever designed. 

The Bodoni is shown in the Lowney's Cocoa 
advertisement and the Bodoni Italic is shown in 
the K. N. & K. advertisement. The Lowney's ex- 
ample is really a Forceful Educational advertise- 
ment and does not come under this heading, but 
I have been unable to find the Bodoni used in a 
Passive Educational advertisement, due no doubt 
to the fact that the series has not had a very wide 
use up to this time. 

Bookman is seldom used for body matter un- 
less well spaced. 

The border in The Mutual Motors Company ad- 
vertisement is so heavy that a lighter face type 
than the Bookman would make the border stand 
out too much. As it is handled this face relieves 
the force of the border. 

There are any number of bold types and any 
number of hght face types that can be used for 
the makeup of the Passive Educational style. 
Few, however, are as useful and as easily read as 
Caslon Old Style. Cheltenham Bold and Bodoni 



BODONI 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of mes | The tclephonic reception and fi | 
sages locally oflfers many advanUges over a j.^ ^^ mCSSagCS locally oflfcrs m 
physical handling by messenger, but these ° i . i 

advanuges will not be fuUv realized unless ^ny advantages over a physical 

IN ANY GIVEN ESTABLISHMENT THE HANDLING BY MESSENGER, 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally | 
offers many advantages over a physical handling by mes 
SENGER, BUT THESE ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages | 
LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES OV 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of mess | 
AGES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVAN 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing | 
OF MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFE 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception a | 
ND FILING OF MESSAGE 

Thirty Point 

The telephoNIC REC | 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telephONIC R 



What cocoa for children— 
who've tired of plain milk? 




Surely not an unknown 
"paper bag" or cheapened 
canned cocoa — which may be 
way below par in nutritive 
butter fats. Such cocoas — 
robbed of their nutritive ele- 
ments — are common on the 
market. Surely not a cocoa 
which is too "rich" for children 
to digest — though grown-ups 
may like it. Rather a balanced 
cocoa like Lowney's in which 
a Good Housekeeping analysis 
found 25.92^^ nutritive butler 
fats — a percentage proved to be 



neither too rich nor too "lean" 
for children. 

Each nourishing cup of 
Lowney's Cocoa you serve is 
madewith milk, so yourchildren 
get their milk after all, made 
tempting by the delicious 
Lowney true-cocoa flavor. 

We need hardly add that 
Lowney's Cocoa meets the 
Government standard. Dr. 
Wiley's and the Westfield 
standards of purity in foods. 




At 

Grocers 



In flavor-tight tins 
10c to 50c sizes 



BODONI ITALIC 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of me | J/jg telephonic reception and fi \ 

ssages locally offer, many advantages over ^. ^^ meSSagCS locally offcTS 

a physical handling by messenger, but these 

advantages .'ill not be fully realized unless ^nany advantages OVCT a phySlC 

IN ANY GIVEN ESTABLISHMENT THE AL HANDLING B Y MESSENG 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally \ 
offers many advantages over a physical handling by mes 
SENGER, BUT THESE ADVANTAGES WILL NOT B 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages | 
LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES OV 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of mess | 
AGES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVAN 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing \ 
OF MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFER 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception a | 
ND FILING OF MESSAGE 

Thirty Point 

The telephONIC REC\ 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telePHONIC I 



THE funds for your 
journey will be carried 
with the greatest safety and 
convenience, if you secure 

K, N. & K. 

Travelers^ Checks 

from your banker before 
you leave. 

In denominations of 10, 
20, 50 and 100 dollars at 
a cost of 50 cents for 100 
dollars^ worth. 

New York 



BODONI BOLD 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and fiUng of | The telephonic reception and j 

messages locaUy offers many ad.antagea ^^ ^^ meSSagCS locallv oflFcrS 
over a physical handling by messenger, ^ ^ i . i 

but these advantages will not be fully re many advantages ovcr physical 
ALIZED UNLESS IN ANY GIVEN ESTA HANDLING BY MESSENGER 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages loca | 
lly offers many advantages over a physical handling 
BY MESSENGER, BUT THESE ADVANTAGES WIL 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messag | 
ES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of m | 
ESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY AD 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and fi | 
LING OF MESSAGES LOCALLY 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception | 
AND FILING OF MESSA 

Thirty Point 

The Telephonic RE | 

Thirty-Six Point 

The TelEPHONI 



BODONI SHADED 

Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages local | 
ly offers many advantages over a physical handling by 
MESSENGER, BUT THESE ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE 



The telephonic reception and filing of messages ) 
locally offers many advantages over a physical hand 

LING BY MESSENGER, BUT THESE ADVANTAG 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of| 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and fil I 
ING OF MESSAGES LOCALLY 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and I 
FILING OF MESSAGES LOCA 

Twenty-four Point 

The telephoiiic jreceptioml 
AND FILING OF MESSA 

Thirty Point 



Thirty-six Point 



The TelEPHON 




Seven Passenger $1185 

If you're thinking of a five passenger car in the 
neighborhood of $1000 to $1100, you will want 
to consider the MARION-HANDLEY Seven 
Passenger Six at $1185. 

You maintain a MARION-HANDLEY on a 
five passenger expense, while you get the com- 
fort, enjoyment and broader service of a Seven. 

And the Family car should, by all means, be 
a seven passenger. Even tho you can squeeze 
your family into a five you want a seven because 
you have friends and relatives whom you wish 
to entertain. It is just as embarrassing to be 
crowded for automobile space as it is to be with- 
out a spare bed room. 

You are not carrying around bulk, and weight; 
you are not eating up tires, gasoline and oil when 
the car is only required as a Five, But when 
you want seven passenger capacity, you have it 
in comfort and with no increased expense. 

And when you can maintain a Marion-Handley 
Seven at the price of a five, why have a five? 

In beauty, refinements, finish and power the 
MARION-HANDLEY is unsurpassed by any 
six under $1500. That's why we call it the "six 
pre-eminent." 

Write for further particulars and name of dealer. 
J. I. HANDLEY. Pres. 
THE MUTUAL MOTORS COMPANY, Jackson, Mich. 



mmmmim 



CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 73 

Bold are about as bold as the Passive Educational 
style will stand. 

So much for type faces that appeal to men. 

When we appeal to women we must be more 
'' fussy ^' about the type we use. 

Caslon Old Style, of course, knows no gender 
in its usefulness, and is a delicate, modest type 
in which to dress an appeal to women. 

Let us suppose, however, that we want some- 
thing more fancy than Caslon Old Style and yet 
not much heavier in tone. The Kennerly series 
will do in that case very nicely. 

If something more fancy as well as a trifle 
more condensed is desired, use Cloister Old Style. 
Of course, Cloister Old Style is harder to read, 
yet sometimes it is imperative to sacrifice legibil- 
ity for particular effect. The ''Banking" clip- 
ping is set in Cloister Old Style. 

The Delia Eobbia shown in the Tecla Pearls 
advertisement is widely used for appealing to 
women. It is easier to read than the Cloister. It 
has one draw-back, however. There is no italic 
made to match perfectly — no Delia Eobbia Italic. 
Cheltenham Old Style Italic as used in the Tecla 
advertisement looks well with it, but not well 
enough. 



KENNERLEY 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally offers | 
many advantages over a physical handling by messenger, but 
these advantages will not be fully realized unless in any given 
ESTABLISHMENT THERE IS SOME BUSINESS THAT 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and fiHng of messages lo | 
cally offers many advantages over a physical handl 
ING BY MESSENGER, BUT THESE ADVANT 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of mess | 
ages locally offers many advantages aver a 
PHYSICAL HANDLING BY MESSENGE 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of | 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MA 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception | 
AND FILING OF MESS 

Thirty Point 

The telep RECEP | 

Thirty-Six Point 

The teleph REG | 



KEHHERLET ITALIC 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages local | 
ly offers many advantages over a physical handling b)> 
messenger, hut these advantages will not he fully real 
IZED UNLESS m AKY GIVE?i ESTABLISH 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messag \ 
es locally offers many advantages over a physi 
cal handling by messenger, hut these advantag 
ES WILL HOT BE FULLT REALIZED 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of m I 
essages locally offers many advantages ov 
er a physical handling by messenger, but 
THESE ADVAJ<iTAGES WILL 7^0 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception a \ 
nd filing of messages locally 
offers many advantages over 
A PHYSICAL HAHDLI 




OUR NEW BANKING DEPARTMENT IS PLEASING 
DEPOSITORS AND RECEIVING COMMENDATION 

ANKING has been accorded extraordinary care 
by the management with the view to making it as 
nearly faultless as is possible with so important a 
part of our business. Every accommodation that 
makes for the convenience and satisfaction of our 
numerous patrons has been provided, and the hours have been so 
arranged as to encourage savings. The men who have assumed 
the care of this department are gentlemen well known for honesty 
and efficiency in business, financial and professional circles of our 
flourishing community. Each one is a representative citizen whose 
reputation is thoroughly established, and who is well informed on 
matters pertaining to the banking business. It will be the earnest 
and constant effiart to influence saving on the part of the working 
classes, and many benefits are expeded to accrue which frequently 
are given comparatively slight attention and which many persons 



CLOISTER OLD STYLE 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of me | The telephonic reception and filing I 

ssages locally ofFers many advantages over a ^f messages locally offers many adva 

physical handling by messenger but these ^ ^^^^ ^ ^^.^^^ handling by 

advantagesw.il not be fully realized unless . .iUccM/-CD RT TT TT-TnCC A 

IN ANY GIVEN ESTABLISHMENT MESSENGER, BUT THESE A 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally ofFers m | 
any advantages over a physical handling by messenger, but these 
ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE FULLY REALIZED UN 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally | 
OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES OVER A PHYSI 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages, | 
LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of | 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS M 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception and | 

FILING OF MESSAGES, L 

Thirty Point 

The telephoNIC AND | 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telephONIC A 



CLOISTER OLD STYLE ITALIC 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages | The telephonic reception and filing of \ 

locally offers many advantages o-ver a physical ^nessages locally ojfers many advantages 

handling by messenger, but these advantages itiill r ■ i i it- i 

not be fully realized unless in any gi-ven establi '>'"' ^ P^y"'""^ handling by messenger, 

SHMENT THERE IS SOME BUSINESS BUT THESE ADVANTAGES JVI 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally offers many | 
advantages over a physical handling by messenger, but these advantages 
WILL NOT BE FULLY REALIZED UNLESS IN ANY GIVE 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally offers | 
MANY ADVANTAGES OVER A PHYSICAL HANDL 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally | 
OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES OVER A PHY 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing ofmes [ 
SAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY A 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception and fili I 
NG OF MESSAGES LOCALE 

Thirty Point 

The telephonic RECEPTI | 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telephoNIC REC 



TECLA PEARLS 

Like Oriental Pearls—^ 
are a Work of Nature 



But Tecia Pearls are made in a Paris laboratory by 
alchemists, whereas the Oriental Pearl occurs in the 
oyster? 

That is true; but arc not both man and oyster the 
work of Nature? And is a Pearl any less of a Pearl 
whether Nature uses a man or an oyster as the instrU' 
rnent of production? 

Teda Pearls themselves furnish a negative answer 

To see them alongside Oriental Pearls is to see— on/y 
Orientals. 

Assemble them both on one string, and only an expert 
in gems can unravel their identities 

In coloring, temper, iridescence, opacity, and Orient, 
they more than resemble, they repeat! 

Each is the alter ego of the other — the counterpart — the 
image and likeness — the salt and soul of similarity. 

That is»Vvhy, to-day, they share honors equsJly with the 
Oriental Pearl, and are worn, both here and abroad, 
by women of social standing and social scruples. 

They concede to the real Oriental the sole distinction 
of being prohibitive in cost without any visible excuse. 



TeCLA PEARL NECKLACES 

In graduated <fT uniform strands with diamond clasp 
$75 to $350 



C L 



398 : FIFTH AVENUE : NEW YORK 
10 ,: RUE DE LA PAIX' ; PARIS 



DELLA ROBBIA 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of mes | The telephonic reception and filing | 

sages locally offers many advantages over a ^f messages locally offers many adv 

physical handling by messenger, but these , . , i „„ji- „ l„ 

^ / .„ , r M 1 J I antages over a physical handling by 

advantages will not be fully realized unless ^^ * ^Mr-CD Di it TI-ICCC AHX/ 

IN ANY GIVEN ESTABLISHMENT MESSENGER, BUT THESE ADV 
Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally off | 
ers many advantages over a physical handling by messen 
GER, BUT THESE ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages loc | 
ALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES OVE 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of m | 
ESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MAN 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and fil j 
ING OF MESSAGES LOGAL 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception | 

AND FILING OF MES 

Thirty Point 

The telephonic REC| 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telephoNIGI 



CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 81 

I have often wondered why the Cadmus Series, 
as shown in the Lilas de Rigaud advertisement, 
was not more widely used for appealing to women. 
I realize that it has the fault of not having a suit- 
able italic to match, and is not easily read, but I 
believe some excellent effects are yet to be pro- 
duced with it. 



THE HANDLETTERED STYLE 

Of course there is no type face that can be used 
when pure handlettering is desired. 

There are, however, times when the handlet- 
tered effect is desired, but the appropriation is 
not large enough to cover the cost. Use type 
which is made primarily to imitate handletter- 
ing. 

The Packard series, shown in the E. R. Black- 
mer advertisement, is one of the best type imita- 
tions of handlettering. I've often had advertisers 
ask for some of "that hand-drawn type," w^hen 
they meant the Packard series. 

Another series which resembles handlettering 
very closely is the Tabard series, an exhibit of 
w^hich is shown by the Gano-Downs advertisement. 

The Kennerly and Cloister Old Style series are 
other good substitutes for handlettering. 



Get a dainty souvenir bottle of 
Cpar/um 

The true odor of lilacs 
bloom, the perfume of 
old gardens and child- 
hood's tender memories. 
The most delicate, un- 
obstrusive and fashionable of perfumes. 
Extract, toilet \(^ater, sachet powder, talcum, 
cold cream, massage cream and face po^x^der. 
Present the follo^^ing coupon with 1 5c to your 
druggist or toilet. goods department, and a 
souvenir bottle of Lilas de Rigaud will be sent 
you by Rigaud of Mary Garden fame. 




Kindly send me a- souvenir bottle of Lilas de Rigaud Perfume and 
Ixxiklet entitled "Personality in Perfume." 

Name- 

Addres3 - - 

Dty State 

(Your dealer will send this coupon to George Borgfeldt <& Co., Irving 
Place, New York, agents for Rigaud, Paris.) 



A Single Pearl 
Ring 

for Milady 



s 

s 
s 

s 



PEARLS We a tenderness and a romantic 
atmospKere tKat appeals to all women. There 
is nothing more appropriate or pleasing. 
You -rfiU pnd Blackmer's Single Pearl Rings just the 
thing for gifts for every occasion. We are sure that 
you will be surprised at the reasonable prices of these 
rings when 9°" exanune them. Call tomorrow. 

E. R. BLACKMER 

DIAMONDS WATCHES JEWELRY 

OPP. NORMAL SCHOOL. FREDERICTON 



PACKARD 

Six Point Eight Point 

TKe telephonic reception and filing of me | TKe telepKonic reception and filing of | 

ssages locally offers many advantages over. ^^,^^^ l^callj) offers many advanta 
physical handling by messenger, but these , , , ., , 

advantages v^ill not be fully realized unless ^^^ °''^' ^ ph>)sical handling by mess 

IN ANY GIVEN ESTABLISHMEN ENGER. BUT THESE ADVAM 

Ten Point 

TKe telepKonic reception and fling of messages locallj) offers | 
many acl\)antages over a pKysical Kandling by messenger, but 

THESE ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE FULLY REA 

Twelve Point 

The telepKonic reception and filing of messages locall}?! 

OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES OVER A PH 

Fourteen Point 

The telepKonic reception and filing of messages | 

LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANT 

Eighteen Point 

TKe telepKonic reception and filing of | 

MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS 

Twenty-Four Point 

TKe telepKonic reception and| 

FILING OF MESSAGES L 

Thirty Point 

TKe telepKonic RECEP| 

Thirty-Six Point 

TKe teleponic REC| 




TKere s a wonderful 
. . sKirt Kerc for 



»i 



.50 



and seme even finer 
for a little mors 

^ leu cKang? your suit and under 
wear with tKc calendar, wKy not 
wear a djHersnt styls of sKirt? 

<? .The sKlrts we suggest will change 
ysur appearancf, t9o. 

fl W? have in mind parKcularly our 
stiff bosom shirts, our half bosom 
shirts, our thirtesn inch plaits and 
full Ungth plaits. 

^ Any sf them will make ysur collar 
f«el more comfortabi?, nsw that 
you are wearing a vest. 

GAN0-IX>5«^lS 

Sixteenth and Stout 




CHRISTMAS FURNITURE 
GIFTS 

TKe more real interest you feel in your Holiday 
shopping tKe stronger will be your desire to 
select that wKicK serves as well as beautifies 
— wbicK will in some way express comfort and 
luxury as well as art. 

In offering a few suggestions as to attractive 
Holiday Gifts, we remind our patrons of our 
exceptional facilities for solving tbe vexatious 
question of "where to find the correct gift ?" 

WRITING DESKS SMOKING STANDS 

TEA TABLES HRESIDE CHAIRS 

TOILET TABLES MAGAZINE RACKS 

CHILDREN'S CHAIRS BRIDGE TABLES 

and innumerable other pieces especially appro- 
priate for gifts. 

ORIENTAL AND DOMESTIC RUGS 
AND DRAPERIES 

FLINT © HORNER CO., inc. 

20-26 WEST 36tli STREET 
NEW YORK 



f 


MMiiMiiiiiiiiii niiiiiiiiinniiimiiiiiinnimra 


S.W.Straus«Co. 


= 

1 

1 


1 


FmuM ISa lDc«vml«i IMS 




1 


FulfilKn^ tke vinon of 


= 


1 


ita founder, tliis insti- 


= 


1 


tution serves and 'will 


1 


M 


continue to ecrve its 


= 


1 


double function .in pro- 


= 


1 


viding safe investments 


1 


i 


for tke funds of tte 


1 


1 


public and tLe upbuild- 


1 


i 


ing of ttis nation's per- 


m 


1 
1 


manent prosperity. 


= 


1 
i 


Promoting ttrift, en- 


1 


= 
= 


couraging systematic ac- 


1 


■ 


cumulations, providing 


■ 


■ 


for suck accumulations a 


1 


= 


form of investment un- 


= 


= 
1 


impeacLably conserva- 


= 




tive; and giving to eact 


1 


S 


investor, large or small. 


= 


1 


a real, vital, and profit- 


1 


1 


able part in tbe material 


i 


1 


improving of tbe nation s 


1 


3 


great cities: Xbis is our 


= 




work. 


= 




We will be pleased to 


= 
1 




bonor requests by mail 


1 




or in person for Ktera- 


■ 




ture describing tbe sound 


1 


1 


5V2% first mortgage 


1 


1 


bonds we offer. Invest- 


1 


1 


ors sbould ask for 


1 


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CireuJar -No. B 704 


1 


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S.WSTRAUS&CO. 


= 
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MUKtAj-ouj BmoiT au Fiucaco- 


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3i Years Wk%^t Lot, to 




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Any Investor' 


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'iiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiyiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiHiiimitiiiiiiiHiii 



PABST 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of me | TKe telepkonic reception and fill | 

ssages locally offers many advantages over ^^ ^f messages locally offers many 
a physical handling by messenger, but these , i • i l it 

, ... L i: 11 1- J 1 advantages over a physical handli 

advantages -will not be fully realized unless " ^ 

IN ANY GIVEN ESTABISHMENT NG BY MESSENGER, BUT T 
Ten Point 

TLe telephonic reception and filing of messages locally offe | 
rs many advantages over a physical kandung by messenger, 

BUT THESE ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE 

Twelve Point 

Tke telepKonic reception and filing of messages loca | 

LLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES OV 

Fourteen Point 

Tke teletjlionic reception and filing or me | 

SSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MA 

Eighteen Point 

Xke telephonic reception and fil | 

ING OF MESSAGES LOG 

Twenty-Four Point 

Tke telepnonic reception | 

AND HANDLING O 

Thirty Point 

i he telepnonic REC | 

Thirty-Six Point 

Tke telepkoNIC 



CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 89 

For something heavier in the handlettered effect 
there is the Pabst series, which is shown in the 
Flint & Horner advertisement and the S. W. 
Straus & Co. advertisement. 

The Pabst is not correct for the S. W. Straus 
& Co. advertisement. Compare it with the Flint 
& Horner example, which requires something ir- 
regular to be in keeping with the border draw- 
ing. Bookman would have been much better for 
the S. W. Straus & Co. advertisement because 
there the shape of the space, the squareness of 
the border, and the fact that the advertiser is a 
banking house almost demand that the type be 
simple and dignified. 

THE POSTER 

Here the artist does the entire advertisement 
in one drawing which eliminates any discussion 
of type for this style of advertisement. 

THE CHARACTER OR COMIC 

This style is usually the Forceful Educational 
style plus the illustration ; therefore the same type 
faces which have been outlined for the Forceful 
Educational style apply equally to the Character 
or Comic style. 



FOSTER 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messa| 
ges locally offers many advantages over a 
physical handling by messenger, but these 
ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE FULLY 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of | 
messages locally offers many advant 
AGES OVER A PHYSICAL HAN 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and| 
FILING OF MESSAGES LO 

Twenty-four Point 

The telephonic recepti| 
ON AND FILING OF 

Thirty Point 

The telephonic rec| 
EPTION AND FI 



Thirty-six Point 



The TELEPH 



CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 91 



THE MAIL ORDER 

This is the Forceful Educational style with 
greater contrast, more emphasis, more display 
lines and stronger illustration. Therefore the 
basic principles of the Forceful Educational 
style govern the make-up of the Mail Order 
style. 

The main point of difference is that the contrast 
must be strong — the strongest possible. 

Change to the Gothic styles for the display lines 
but stick to Old Style for the body matter. This 
will give extra strength. 

The Foster Series is a good one to use instead 
of Gothic because it is not so blunt and sharp and 
yet it is equally as strong. 

Three lines of condensed Foster are shown in 
the Carmen Complexion Powder advertise- 
ment. 

John Hancock is another good substitute for 
Gothic. The watch advertisement uses the John 
Hancock series for the figures *'2.50" and the 
words ^'19 Jewel Burlington.'^ 

The type used in small space advertisements 
should be the same as that used in the Forceful 
Educational style. 




For a 

Complexion 

Like Hers 



simply do what Louise Huff 
and other famous stars do, 
whose complexions are subject 
to particular notice— use Carmen 
Complexion Powder. Then you will 
have a complexion of peach-and-cream charm. Blends 
perfectly with the tones of the skm— and it adheres. 
^ Does not rub or blow off. 

Gives a clear, glowing 
complexion that is always 
beautiful despite plarmg 
light and perspiration. 
Why put up with ordinary 
face powders when Car- 
I men will give you the most 
charming 
complexion 

~ beauty ? 

Get a box to-day and see how delighted 
you will be. Insist on Carmen 
lyhite. Pink, Flesh. Cream 
50c Everywhere 

STAFFORD-MILLER CO.. 
525 Olive St., St. Louis. Mo. 



iCARMENi 

Complexion 

Powder 





SASO^Month 

V ^W ^^^^ The master- 
^^-■^^■•^ pi ec e of 



^^^J watch manufacture 
^^^^M — adjusted to the 
^^^^^ second, posit ions, 
temperature and isochro- 
nism Encased at the fac- 
tory into your choice of the 
exquisite new watch cases. 

19 Jewel 

Burlington 

The great Burlington Watch sent 
on simple request. Pay at the rate 
You get the watch at the same 
wholesale jeweler must pay. 

• , — xtT t » 1 SeahindBome 

Write Today for Free Watch Book color lausfationo 

of aUthe DeweBt ^eBignB In watoheB that you have to <=hoo^cfi«W. Your 
name and addreBB on a poetcard ia enough. Get this off.r whilj Hlaat*. 

BurlingtonWat^^ 



All sizes for both, 
men and women, 
of $2.50 a month, 
price even the 



x^V 



CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 93 

THE SMALL SPACE STYLE 

The display lines are seldom as strong as the 
Mail Order style. 

The aim is to get strength and attention by 
odd shapes and special designs. Then stick to 
Cheltenham Bold for display and Caslon Old Style 
for body matter, or similar contrasting faces. 

When we produce an all-black-type small space 
advertisement it takes its place among the cheaper 
Mail Order style whether the copy says so or not. 

THE DEPARTMENT STORE STYLE 

At present there is not much character to the 
majority of department store advertisements — 
they are just price lists. There is a tendency, 
however, toward making department store adver- 
tisements more interesting. I believe the future 
department store advertisement will be a group 
of small Forceful Educational advertisements — 
logical reasons for buying rather than compara- 
tive prices. 

Whether a department store advertisement is 
of the new Forceful Educational style or the com- 
parative price style it is necessary that there be 
contrast between the different features. This can 



JOHN HANCOCK 

Six Point Eight Point 

Tbe telephonic reception and | The telepbonlc reception | 

filing of messages locally offe ^^^ filing of messages lo 

rs many advantages over a p __ .. _ 

Hysical handling by messenj ^^^^ «"^''* ""^^^ «*^«» 

ER, BUT THESE ADVANTAGES TAGES OVER A PHYSICA 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and tiling ot m | 
essages locally otters many advantages 
OVER A PHYSICAL HANDLING BY MESS 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and fiUng of | 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and fit | 
ING OF MESSAGES LOCALLY OF 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception | 
AND FILING OF MESSAGE 

Twenty-four Point 

The telephonic rece| 
PTION AND FILING 

Thirty Point 

The TclEPHONIC 

Thirty-six Point 

The TelEPHO 



WINCHELL 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and fil I The telephonic reception | 

ini of messages locally offers ^^j ^^^^^ ^,£ messages local 

many advantages over a physical ■ » 

handling by messenger, hut these *y offers many advantages 

ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE F OVER A PHYSICAL HAND 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of mesl 
sa^es locally offers many advantages over 
A PHYSICAL HANDLING BY MESSENGER 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of| 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and fil| 
ING OF MESSAGES LOCALLY 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception! 
AND FILING OF MESSA 

Twenty-four Point 

The telephonic rece| 
PTION AND FILING 

Thirty Point 

The TELEPHONI 

Thirty-six Point 

The TELEPH 



WEE® 

Twelve Point 

AB'WAmTAm.B WELL ]M©¥ EE IFOILLY 

Fourteen Point 

Th(B SeE@p!]ii®nnn(g ]r'(g€©pSn®EQ aisidl ffSEnnog ®^| 
Mi@ss§ii®s E®(£iiDDy ®i!i!©n=s mmmj adl^amnii 
A(^ES ©¥EE A IPEYSECAL HAM 

Eighteen Point 

Tin© ll(gll(eplla®nnn(s ir©(S(gpftn®iB iinfldl| 
FSLnM(S ©F MESS^(^ES L© 

Twenty-four Point 

TEn® ft®E®pIiii®nnn© r®(£®plln| 



Thirty Point 



ElFTni©!! AMD) FE 



Thirty-six Point 



Thm TELEF 




CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 97 

be done by odd-sized panels and spots of bold 
type throughout. 

Just about now I believe the reader will be won- 
dering why I show some type faces which are not 
included in any of the classifications mentioned. 

There are really only two styles left, namely: 
the shaded series and the outline series. 

The Bodoni Shaded shown on Page 71 is for 
use on Forceful Educational advertisements that 
require restraint in the headings. There is also 
the Cheltenham Shaded and others. All are about 
the same tone as Bodoni Shaded. 

The Webb is an outline letter which will also 
do well to tone down a strong heading. There are 
also several other good outline type faces. 

There are many rugged letters of about the 
same tone value as Cheltenham Bold. These are 
used where more of a bold hand lettered character 
is desired. Post is about the best of these rugged 
bold faces. 

Nearly all families of type contain a condensed 
font of the same character. This is for use in 
high narrow spaces. Cheltenham Bold condensed 
is shown on page 100. 

Just a word about the most prevalent faults in 
choosing type faces for each classification. 

Too many hinds of type are used in Forceful 



POST 

Six Point Eight Point 

THe telepKonic recepti | TKe telepKonic rece| 

on and filing of niessa^e ption. ai^d filing of m 

8 locally offers many ad , , ,- ^^^ 

vantages o^er a pHysica eSSHgeS locall?^ offers 

C HANDLING BY MESS MANY ADVANTAG 

Ten Point 

Tlie teleptionic reception and filinl 
g of messages locally offers man>^ a 
DVANTAGES OVER A PHYSICAL 

Twelve Point 

TKe telepKonic reception and fil| 
ING OF MESSAGES LOCALLY 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception | 
AND FILING OF MESSA- 

Eighteen Point 

THe telepKonic recept| 
ION AND TILING OF M 

Twenty-four Point 

THe telephonic re | 
CEPTION AND FI 

Thirty Point 

The telEPHONI 

Thirty-six Point 

The teLRPHI 



POST CONDENSED 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and fii I The telephonic reception an| 

ing of messages locally offers man d filing messages locally off 

y advantages over a J^[*^^| j**^^ ers many advantages over a 

VANTAGErwiLL NOT BE FOLLO PHYSICAL HANDLING BY ME 
Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages 1 1 
ocally offers many advantages over a physical ha 
NDLING BY MESSENGER, BUT THESE ADVANTA 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of mess | 
AGES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGE 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of| 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and n| 
LING OF MESSAGES LOCALLY 

Twenty-four Point 

The telephonic reception | 
AND FILING OF MESSA 



Thirty Point 



The telephonic REC 



Thirty-six Point 



The telephonic R| 



CHELTENHAM BOLD CONDENSED 

Six Point Eight Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messa | The telephonic reception and filing of I 

ge> locally offers many adyantages over a phy messages locally offers many advanta 

sical handling by messenger, but these advant i ■ i i n- t 

.„..£„ I- J I • ges over a physical handling by messe 

ages will not be fully reabzed unless in any g\ ^ *^ ■' * •' 

VEN ESTABLISHMENT THERE IN SOME BU NGER, BUT THESE ADVANTAGES 

Ten Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally offers | 
many advantages over a physical handling by messenger^ but th 
ESE ADVANTAGES WILL NOT BE FULLY REALIZED UNLE 

Twelve Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messages locally | 
OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES OVER A PHYSICAL HA 

Fourteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of messag | 
ES LOCALLY OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES 

Eighteen Point 

The telephonic reception and filing of| 
MESSAGES LOCALLY OFFERS MAN 

Twenty-Four Point 

The telephonic reception and | 

FILING OF MESSAGES LOG 

Thirty Point 

The telephonic RECEPT | 

Thirty-Six Point 

The telephonic REC| 



CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES 101 

Educational advertisements. Two faces are suffi- 
cient; hath should he related in character of de- 
sign; there shoidd he contrast hetween these two 
faces to produce a quick reading of the message. 

The Passive Educational style offers the widest 
range in selection. Caslon Old Style is good. 
Bookman is better. Both are good for a general 
appeal. Men like the more sturdy type faces. 
"Women like the more dainty and the irregular 
type faces similar to Kennerly or Delia Robbia. 

Do not use a type to imitate handlettering un- 
less there is a good reason why you should imitate 
handlettering. 

Do not crowd bold type into a small advertise- 
ment. If you have something dominant, sup- 
ported by some design not built at right angles, 
the advertisement will be seen and read with- 
out screamingly bold type throughout. 

Do not try to memorize a mass of type faces. 
If your code of principles on which you choose 
type faces is correct you will immediately see 
that you only need to know a few type faces. We 
have been trying to remember and use too many 
type faces. Let's forget a few of them. 



CHAPTER IV 

THE COMBINATION OF TYPE FACES 

^'What two faces of tj^pe look well together T' 
is a very common question in my daily work. 

The answer to this question depends a great 
deal on what style advertisement is being built. 

For instance, no two faces look well together 
in a Passive Educational advertisement ; the type 
must be all of the same face to get the desired 
effect. 

In Forceful Educational, Mail Order, Small 
Space and Department Store advertisements there 
must be contrast between the headlines and the 
body of the advertisement. The headlines and 
subheadings must be easily read; and if the copy 
in the headlines is strong enough the headlines will 
be read and if there is sufficient contrast between 
headlines and body matter the body matter will 
be read. 

About the best combination for advertisements 
of the above group is that used in most advertise- 
ments in The Saturday Evening Post. This is 
Cheltenham Bold for the display lines and either 

103 



104 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

Caslon Old Style (or some old style face which 
produces the same effect) for the body of the 
advertisement. 

When heavier type is used for the body part, 
increasingly heavier type should be used for the 
headlines. For instance: Cheltenham Old Style 
(being heavier than Caslon Old Style) used with 
Cheltenham Extra Bold produces the same ef- 
fect as Caslon Old Style and Cheltenham Bold. 

If strong contrast is not desired then the Chel- 
tenham family or the Caslon family w^orked to- 
gether is excellent. 

A family is many tones, shapes and variations 
of a tj])e face, all of the same characteristics; 
that is, Cheltenham Bold for display lines and 
Cheltenham Old Style for the body. Cheltenham 
Bold Condensed can be used in the display lines 
when the width is more important than height; 
also in the headings Cheltenham Bold Italic can 
be used for several emphasized words of the copy. 
Any bold italic should be used sparingly. In the 
body part, Cheltenham Old Style Italic can be 
used with Cheltenham Old Style, or, where space 
permits, Cheltenham Wide can be used for the 
body part of an advertisement. Then there is the 
Cheltenham Bold Extra Condensed, Medium Bold, 
Extended, Inline and Outline. 



THE COMBINATION OF TYPE FACES 105 

The family idea in type faces is an excellent 
thing. Practically every face has many V' brothers 
and sisters'' that aid materially in the building of 
beautiful effects. Caslon, Bodoni, Cloister, Post, 
and others are made in families, but none with 
as many variations as the Cheltenham. 

^^The Book of Knowledge'' advertisement is set 
in the Cheltenham family entirely, but the dif- 
ferent members of the family have not been well 
chosen. 

I reproduce this advertisement: first to show 
that the family idea, Avhile excellent, does not 
guarantee perfection, and, second, because it rep- 
resents a class of advertisements whose builders 
try to make everything read at once. 

By actual tests italic type is much more difficult 
to read than old style aAd should be used spar- 
ingly and primarily for emphasis only. (See 
Chapter ''What Is Emphasis and What Is Not.") 
All emphasis, however, is no emphasis, and when 
we mix a w^hole paragraph of bold type with 
italics the difficulty is enhanced and the effect 
cheap and distressing. 

If the story has merit a few strong headlines 
that meet the reader more than halfway will get 
a reading quicker than every line screaming for 
attention. Everyone in a crowd speaking at once 




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THE GROLIER SOCIETY 

2 IVcst 45lh St., Ntu) York 

Please mail me descriptive book " T'Ae 
Child and the Book of Knowledge," ex- 
plaining the use and meaning of the work- 
Name 

Address 






The "SAN MORITZ" Sweater, 
Scarf and Skating Cap 

Made in Switzerland and imported direct from San Moritt 

THIS sweater, scarf and skating cap are the 
smartest and most popular of this season's 
models — cashmere-wool — light weight and 
warm — sweater trimmed with collar and wrist 
bands of fluffy white or black Russian Hare. 
All sizes ; Colors : white, pink, light blue, 
turquoise, light, medium and dark Copenhagen, 
corn, putty, reseda, 
emerald, myrtle, 
purple, black. 



\ 





San Moritz" Sweater 
(With Fur) 

San MoritzV Sweater 

(Without Fur) 

San Moritz" Scarf . . 

(Colors same as Sweater) 

San Moritz" Cap . . . 

(Colors same as Sweater) 



$17.50 

$12.50 

$3.50 

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Importation limited. Send your order with size and shade desired to-day. 
Imported Wool and Silk Sweaters of all descriptions. 



543 Madison Ave. 




New York City 



STORED WITH A RICH PROFUSION OF UNUSUAL 
RARITIES FITTED FOR THE COMING YULE-TIDE 



NOT furniture alone, but every sig- 
nificant thing which help& in the; 
beautifying or the adornment of the 
home, may be found in exquisite expres- 
sion at the Hampton Shops, with its eleven 
^ deftly composed Galleries of Display. 

Here may be seen— integral parts of 
a series of harmonious wholes, and either' 
bearing the obvious, if indefinable, cachet 
attaching to the name Hampton, or the 
results of selective visits to European 
highways and by-ways — such suggest- 
ively Christmas offerings as Writing 
Tables of unusual chafm. Desk Sets of 
French or Italian tooled leather, quaint 
appearing Boxes for the man's diverse 
uses, attractive bits of old Waterford 
Glass, Lamps, fashioned of Chinese Porce- 
lains and fitted for electric 
light, and a host of small Cab- 
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of Chippendale, Sheraton and 

fthe Brothers Adam. 
pipConStops 
f eallmts of rtitttiorDecoratitm 
u 18 em 50S StottnemYotk 





Incedors 




THE COMBINATION OF TYPE FACES 109 

makes for confusion. One person at a time speak- 
ing to a crowd makes for attention. 

Type is the vehicle of thought. Get the thought 
clear and keep the type clear and if you need 
strong contrast make it strong, do not dally. 

The Cheltenham family is an excellent one but 
it does not look well when used with Engraver's 
Old English, or Ecclesiastical letters. 

There is no need for the use of Engraver's Old 
English type in the "Sweater" advertisement. 
A panel across the top with one line of caps and 
small caps of the Cheltenham Old Style would 
have been much more in harmony. 

Advertisers are prone to use Engraver's Old 
English for Easter and Christmas advertise- 
ments, although this often spoils the harmony of 
the advertisement and at the same time adver- 
tises the season more than the article. 

Caslon or Bookman are the best faces to use 
with Engraver's Old English where the use of 
this face is advisable. 

The Hampton Shop's advertisement is set in 
Bookman and combined with an Old English style 
of handlettering. This effect is very pleasing. 

Do the two bold lines in the center increase the 
effectiveness of the Berkey & Gay advertisement? 
Isn't it a fact that these lines get first attention! 




THE MODERATE PRICE OF BEKKEY ^ GAY FUP.NI- 
TUKE IS A PLEASANT SURPRISE TO MANY PEOPLE 

IN the thousands of American homes where Berkey 6- Gay furniture has been 
in service during the lifetime of the past and present generation, its beauty and 
its heirloom qualities are well known. To those who have enioyed it and 
become familiar with it, either as guests in these homes or through other contact. 
It is natural the assumption should be that it must of course be quite expensive. 



Q Closer familiarity and contact with Berkey £r Gay Furniture, however, develops the fact that it is not: that 
prid& in the possession, assurance of thorough goodness and enjoyment in its ownership may be e5«perienced 
with an outlay no greater than would bej:.equired for that which is quite ordinary. 

Berkey & Gay Furniture 

"FOR YOUR CHILDREN'S HEIRLOOMS'* 

contains a wealth of meaning in the present value of this heirloom quality. 



Q In this ability to produce a standard at a commercially 
possible price the Berkey 6- Gay organization is verv unusual. 
There are no others similar. Ideals adhered to rigidly : ap- 
proval by the American people in a big way and the desire of 
responsible retailers in representative communities throughout 
the country to link iheir effort with ours, are in a great measure 
responsible The entire situation is found in the fact that there 
is but one Berkey &• Gay Furniture Company 



Q A booklet called " Masterpieces in Miniature " containing 
fifty reproductions of plates from our dealers portfolio gives 
a very good idea of the great possibilities for tasteful, 
correct home furnishing in the Berkev 6- Gay Furniture. 
This, together with Eugene Field's Whimsical Poem "In 
Amsterdam," we will be glad to send upon receipt of 
six cents in United States postage. 




BERKEY dr GAY FURNITURE. CO. 

Factories. Executive Office and Show Rooms 

188 Monroe Avenue 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Eastern Office and Show Rooms 1 1 3- 1 19 West 40ih Street. New York- 
Wholesale Only 
Visitors' privileges extended only when accompanied/by a dealer 
or with a letter of introduction 




This inlaiil matk o( honor 
iitenlifies lo you eai:h 
Berkey & 6ay piece 



THE COMBINATION OF TYPE FACES 111 

Isn't it also true that the principle of selling in 
print is to have the picture get first attention, 
heading second attention, argument third, name 
next, etc.? 

While this point may seem trivial, nevertheless, 
many advertisements, some from the largest ad- 
vertisers, are naturally weakened by just such 
small things as the name line in this Berkey & 
Gay copy. There is not one reason why this line 
should be different in style from the rest of the 
type in this advertisement, except, perhaps, it may 
be that the advertiser wanted to be sure that the 
firm name would not be overlooked. 

It is a serious task to put together two faces 
of type in one advertisement. We must know 
whether we are striving for contrast, tone or char- 
acter and be careful to pick the faces to carry out 
our idea. 

We can get character and beauty by the wise 
choice and use of one face only for the entire ad- 
vertisement. When in doubt stick to one family 
of type. It is the style most likely to survive all 
others now used. 

The Eastman Kodak advertisements are famous 
for their consistent use of one face of type only 
— Caslon Old Style. 




The New 3A 

KODAK 



Anastigmatic. — A lens that has a 
trifle more speed than the very best 
of the Rapid Rectilinear lenses and 
that in quality (depth, iharpness and 
flatness of field) is the equaUof the 
very best anastigmats. It is made 
solely for, and is therefore perfectly 
adapted to, Kodak work. 

Autographic. — You can make sure, 
can write the date and title on the 
film, permanently, at the time you 
make the exposure. After the last 
exposure you can similarly write 
your name on the film— an identify- 
ing mark that is valuable when you 
send your work to the finisher. 
And this "Autographing" the film^ 
is a matter of seconds only. 

No. 3A Autographic Kodak. (35ix5'^), . 
with Kodak Anastigmat leqs/ 7.7. . S:?.50 

All Dialers'. 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY. 

ROCHESTER, N, Y., The Kodak Ciiy. 



THE COMBINATION OF TYPE FACES 113 

The New Jersey Zinc Company's use of the 
large word '^Zinc" in Caslon Old Style is an item 
of cumulative good will. Much good will and 
prestige can be obtained by the wise selection and 
consistent use of one face or family of type. 

Many advertisers buy their own type and set 
their own advertisements, sending plates of the 
entire advertisement to the papers. It is usually 
possible, however, to get the same type from many 
publications, provided the layout instructions are 
clear and alike on all copy. 



CHAPTER V 

PUTTING THE ADVERTISEMENT TOGETHER 

We have considered ''The Kinds of Advertise- 
ments/' ''The Classification of Type Faces" and 
"The Combination of Type Faces." 

The next step to consider is how to get the idea 
through many technical hands and yet preserve 
its fundamentals. It is also necessary that this 
be done at the lowest cost and in the least possible 
time. 

There are many kinds of layouts. Some are 
made in a careful and detailed manner for use in 
obtaining the advertiser's complete approval, 
some are made by the advertisement builder for 
use as instruction to the engraver and compositor 
only, and some are used for both. 

The "H. & H." layout was approved by the ad- 
vertiser, then used for ordering the engravings 
and finally sent to the magazine with sizes and 
styles of type faces marked. 

The "Fox" layout was used for ordering the 
engravings and type composition. The instruc- 
tions are written in red ink and the layout is made 
in black ink. This makes it possible for the eye 

115 




Stanidrdize 
XoiiT Coat tocm 



i 



© 



"^i-^ 



mP 







The Har* S; Kuichijison Cb 
M«.wBrtUin. Contt. 






PUTTING ADVERTISEMENT TOGETHER 117 

to grasp the layout as a whole and the technical 
instructions separately. 

Next we show the engraver's part of the job. 
The oval with half-tone and spatter border is 
made in one plate and mounted on the same block 
with line cut of the spatter border. 

We then show the compositor's part of the 
w^ork — the type and trade-mark slug. 

By this method the type can be set while the 
engraver is at work on the cut. The engraver re- 
quires the layout for a few minutes only. 

When the engraving is received w^e put it on a 
job press and take some first-class proofs. Then 
we put the type on the same press and strike it 
into the engraving and we have press proofs of 
the finished advertisement. 

When the advertisement is approved we send 
the t}T3e, the cut, and a press proof to the electro- 
typer who makes a masterplate. (This is the type 
matter and cut put together to conform to the 
proof.) From this masterplate he makes an elec- 
tro for each of the papers of that size space on 
the schedule. 

In the case of a magazine which does not permit 
the use of electrotypes we send duplicate original 
cuts (these made from the same negatives by the 
engraver as was the original) and with these we 



,&A- 



The Finest Gun in the World 







A.M. FOX GrUN COWPANYJ 

V<30B Nor^WEiqMt-emVi Street, PHiL/4DEKF>H»/^.P/^ 






"The Finest Gun in the World" 



A Friend' 
Indeed ! 



HERE'S a perfect gun 
—the "always-there- 
when-wanted" kirtd 
-^staunch and true — and 
every time you pick it up- 
iVll seem to say: "If the bag 
isn't full it's up to you." 

We are back of this finest gun 
in the world with the FOX Proof 
and the FOX Guarantee. The 
safe and sound "Fox Proof" tag is 
on every Fox Gun. And the FOX 
Guarantee— the strongest ever given 
with any gun — is printed and tied 
to every genuine FOX Gun sold. 

If you are a Gun Lover — or the 



Son of a Gun Lover — ask your 
dealer about this guarantee. Also 
ask him. to let you handle the gun. 
Test it. No_gun ever made equals 
it in simplicity and strength, quality 
of workmanship and a more-than- 
human faculty of putting its charge 
where your hand and eye tell it to. 
It will do everything but retrieve 
the game. 

If your dealer hasn't the FOX 
Gun, write us giving his name, 
and ask for catalog 
in colors. It vnll give, 
the FOX Guarantee 
and details of all our 
guns. 




A. H. FOX GUN COMPANY 



4000 North Eighteenth Street, PHILADELPHIA, . PA. 




HERE'S a perfect gun 
—the "always-there- 
when-wanted" kind 
— staunch and true — and 
every time you pick it up 
it'll seem to say: "If the bag 
isn't full it's up to you." 

We are back of this finest gun 
in the world with the FOX Proof 
and the FOX Guarantee. The 
safe and sound "Fox Proof" tag is 
on every Fox Gun. And the FOX 
Guarantee— the strongest ever given 
with any gun— is printed and tied 
to every genuine FOX Gun sold. 

If you are a Gun Lover— or the 



Son of a Gun Lover— ask your 
dealer about this guarantee. Also 
ask him to let you handle the gun. 
Test it. No gun ever made equals 
it in simplicity and strength, quality 
of workmanship and a more-than- 
human faculty of putting its charge 
where your hand and eye tell it to. 
It will do everything but retrieve 
the game. 

If your dealer hasn't the FOX 
Gun, write us, giving his name, 
and ask for Catalog 
in colors. It will give 
the FOX Guarantee 
and details of all our 
guns. 




A. H. FOX GUN COMPANY 



4000 North Eighteenth Street, PHILADELPHIA,' PA. 



122 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

send a press proof of tlie advertisement as ap- 
proved with instructions to follow style for type 
in proof as closely as possible. 

This method insures the same satisfactory set- 
up of the same copy in all papers on the schedule. 
Where the advertiser cannot send complete set- 
up, a copy of layout with full instructions will 
come within 90% of complete satisfaction in the 
majority of magazines and newspapers. 

A word about the idea behind the Fox adver- 
tisement. 

It was decided that this should be the Passive 
Educational style, that there should be no display 
in the advertisement except the pictures of the 
goods and the trade-mark name plate. 

Yet the advertiser wished to lend an atmosphere 
of strengi;h and character to his advertising. He 
also wanted a unique border of the same design 
around on all of the advertisements, something 
that was flexible enough for all sizes and styles 
of advertisements. 

The Bookman Old Style used in this series is 
neither bold nor light face. 

This face is one of the most easily read type 
faces existent, and it readily adds the element of 
strength and character to the Fox copy. 

The spatter border was chosen because it does 



PUTTING ADVERTISEMENT TOGETHER 123 

not attempt to be anything in particular — just an 
even, clean and dignified mass of color. It lends 
itself to any size of advertisement because on 
small advertisements the width of the border can 
be narrowed without losing any of its character. 
Such a border as this on every advertisement 
makes for character, good will and instant recog- 
nition on the part of the reading public. 

TYPE FACTS 

Here is an excellent place to give the reader a 
few type facts which he may or may not know. 

The author believes that these few facts about 
type are sufficient for any conscientious builder 
of advertisements. He also hopes that their brev- 
ity will help toward clearness of comprehension. 

Under the new system now used in all printing 
offices, type is measured by point of body and 
known by name of face, and whether all capitals 
or capitals and lower case, written as 12-Point 
Cheltenham Old Style C. <& L. C, (ab. for Capitals 
and Lower Case). 

The black rules beside the lines of type in 
''Classification of Type Faces'' chapter are placed 
there to show the difference between the actual 
size of the body of the type and the actual size 



IM TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

of the face of the t}^e. There must be room 
below the bottom of most letters in the alphabet 
to take care of letters that descend. The lower 
case '^y'' and ^'g" are examples. 

Type is measured by the body size and not by 
the face size. 

There are 72 points to the vertical inch, there- 
fore 6 lines of 12 point solid type would be 1 inch 
high. Seven lines of 10 point would be 1 inch 
minus 2 points. Nine lines of 8 point make an 
even inch high as do 12 lines of 6 point type. 

A square of any type size is known as an ''em" 
and is 12 x 12 points or 8 x 8 points, etc. 

When determining the number of ''ems" in a 
given space we must use the number of "ems" 
of the size of type used for both dimensions. 
Some advertisement builders have figured that 
the copy is nine 8 point lines deep and set eighteen 
12 point "ems" wide (as all printers' widths are 
measured on 12 point "ems," or pica "ems") 
therefore they would multiply 9 x 18 rather than 
9x27, which is correct, to find the number of 
"ems" in the total depth of the copy set up, or 
to be set. Always use the solid rate regardless 
of whether or not the matter is "leaded." 

The advertisement builder is not so much con- 
cerned, however, about "ems" as he is about 



PUTTING ADVERTISEMENT TOGETHER 1^5 

words to the square inch, hence the following 
table: 

Words per 
sq. inch 

5 point (set solid) 69 

5 point (spaced with 2 point leads between 

lines) 50 

6 point Solid 47 

6 '' 2 point leaded 33 

8 " Solid 30 

8 ^' 2 point leaded 21 

10 " Solid 21 

10 " 2 point leaded 16 

12 '' Solid 14 

12 '' 2 point leaded 11 

14 '' Solid 10 

18 '' " 7 



Do not set 6 or 8 point any wider than 3 inches 
(which is 18 pica ''ems"); 10 point any wider 
than 41/2 inches (which is 27 pica ''ems"); 12 
point any wider than 6 inches; 14 point, 71^ 
inches ; 18 point can go as wide as 10 inches. 

If you have wider measures to fill, split it into 
two or three columns ; it looks better and is not so 
tiresome to read. 

Always leave room if possible for type to be 
spaced with "leads" (pronounced leds) between 
lines, as it makes for easier reading and enables 



126 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

the eye to pick up each line in order. Use a size 
smaller type, if necessary. 

From 1 to 2 point '' leads'' between 6 point 
type; 2 to 3 between 8 point; 2 to 3 between 10 
point ; 3 to 4 points between 12 and 14 point ; and 
18 point can stand 6 and sometimes 8 points be- 
tween the lines but all of the above are the limits 
of spacing. More than this weakens the general 
appearance by making it too gray. 

All of the above remarks relate to regulation 
old style type faces, similar to Old Style No. 15, 
which are used in most advertisements, circulars, 
novels, magazines, newspapers, etc. 

The reader has probably encountered difficulty 
when measuring other type faces such as Book- 
man, Cheltenham Bold, etc., which are wider than 
the average Old Style letter. 

If he will compare the general appearance of 
the type faces he wishes to use with an average 
old style letter the eye will sometimes gauge about 
how many more or how many less w^ords are 
needed to fill the small space above or below the 
average w^hich is given in the table shown in this 
chapter. 

Cheltenham Old Style is one of the very few 
faces that are narrower than the average. Com- 
pare it with the Old Style No. 15 and then com- 



PUTTING ADVERTISEMENT TOGETHER 127 

pare the Bookman with the Old Style No. 15. 
In practically the same space you can get the same 
number of words set in 10 point Cheltenham Old 
Style as if set in 8 point Bookman. 



CHAPTER VI 

MAKING THE MESSAGE QUICK AND SURE 

No matter how much or how fine the material in any 
constructed thing, if this material is unorganized and 
badly formed the result is chaotic.^ 

It is one thing to put together an advertise- 
ment and quite another to put an advertisement 
together with all the sales elements of the copy 
retained in the final display. 

Until recently, great stress has been laid on 
the copy used, and not enough on how the copy 
reaches the reader— how the copy is displayed. 

This, then, is really a chapter on logical sales 
arrangement in print. 

Some advertising men send copy and cut to the 
printer with instructions to ''make as good 'set 
up' as possible." 

There are other advertising men who give too 
many instructions to the printer — some of which 
are impossible. 

* ' * Principles and Practice of Advertising, ' ' 

129 



130 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

Both ideas are wrong. 

The printer is a mechanic producing printing. 
He can get letterheads, cards, blotters, flyers, and 
the like without any other guide than precedent. 

The actual setting of an advertisement, how- 
ever, represents only a very small part of a sales 
campaign, and the man whose constructive im- 
agination builds the campaign must oversee and 
direct the printer who puts the advertisement to- 
gether. 

As a class, the printer is the poorest advertiser 
knoA\Ti today. How, then, can advertising men 
expect him to be able to get 100% perfect display 
on any proposition without outside help — trained 
sales-producing brains 1 

The reason that some printers think advertising 
men have horns, and the reason why some adver- 
tising men wonder how printers as a class man- 
age to keep dry on a rainy day, is because they 
do not understand one another. 

You do not have to be a printer, but you must 
know how a printer works and what he works 
with. 

The type faces used in the advertising of today 
are not extremely numerous or hard to master 
and apply. Most advertising men know what 
types work well together. If these men cannot 



MAKING MESSAGE QUICK AND SURE 131 

name the type faces required they can learn to 
identify them. 

The real advertising man of today knows what 
part of th^ copy is heading, if any. He also knows 
where the cuts would look best. These and many 
other things come up instinctively when he is 
preparing the copy. 

The real problem is to find the proper classi- 
fication of the advertisement in mind and then 
look over the classification of type faces that fit 
the style of advertisement being prepared. 

If this were done more thoroughly and if more 
care were taken with the layout that the printer 
is to use, many inefficient advertisements would 
disappear. 

By thoroughly, I mean prepared and presented 
to the reader with every ounce of sales-appeal or 
sales-atmosphere possible impressed upon the 
reader at first glance. 

About 90% of the readers of newspapers read 
at least 90% of the headings and inscriptions un- 
der pictures, while this same number read less 
than two columns of the body or story portion of 
the paper. 

If the reader you are after does not *^get'^ your 
message at first glance either through the head- 
ings and pictures of the advertisement or through 



Safe underwear that protects you 



^U 



\ 



against winter colds — against getting over- 
heated and then chilled — against ex- 
posure that leads to nose-and-throat- 
trouble, pneumonia and doctor's bills. 

Duof old Underwear 

guards your health. Duofold is two fabrics — cotton and wool 
—knitted together with air-space between. The cotton ab- 
sorbs excessive perspiration. The air-space dries it. And the 
wool keeps you warm. 

You have warm wool to keep in the natural heat of the body 
— but no uncomfortable "woolly" feeUng, because fine soft 
cotton is next the skin. 

Duofold is about half the weight of average winter under- 
wear It gi\es all the advantages of cotton and wool with 
none of their disadvantages. 

Duofold doesn't shrink. 

Made in Union and Two-Piece Suits for Men, Women 
and Children. 

Write us for free sample of the fabric, and our " Comfort 
and Health Underwear " Booklet which tells about preventing 
unnecessary colds. 

Duofold Health Underwear Co., 59 Elizabeth St., Mohawk, N. Y. 




\ 



Duofold Underwear 
Guardsl^wHeaHh 

WRITE gs FOR FREE SAMPi-E :=3 ■'-.^=:z-^=^~ ^ZT 

POOFO1.0 HCAl-TH UNPERWe^l? OOj V^ Eti**t>«^li Sf.^Mohivyk^ V.V' 



'N 



MAKING MESSAGE QUICK AND SURE 133 

a clean and beantiful make-up of the advertise- 
ment then there is a weak link in the building 
chain. 

Some advertisements have no headings; yet 
their make-up is such as to suggest quality and 
distinction in connection with a picture of the 
article advertised. Eastman's even-toned adver- 
tisements are an example. 

There are also some advertisers whose names 
attract attention either because of previous ad- 
vertising or service and leadership in a certain 
line. Grape-Nuts is known because of much pre- 
vious advertising, while Tiffany is known for the 
ultimate in jewelry. These are exceptional. 

My idea is that the heading and picture and 
trade-mark (or trade-name) should tell a com- 
plete, definite, easily remembered story. 

To illustrate : the Duof old advertisement at the 
top of page 132 does not mean anything more to 
me than another brand of underwear. 

In my revision I have not changed the copy in 
any respect — merely the display. 

The five words ^^ Duof old Underwear Guards 
Your Health'' mean something more than just 
another brand of underwear. 

Why did the printer not see this! Because he 
does not have the sales instinct. Why did the 



134 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

printer set the top advertisement as he did! Be- 
cause he has an inherited precedent and tendency, 
when given free rein, to display the first line of 
the copy and the name of the goods advertised. 
Whereas the copy does not call for a heading be- 
cause the real heading in this case is the name 
and the combined five words of the copy near the 
center of the advertisement. 

Who is to blame! The man who prepared the 
advertisement to a large extent, because he 
should have governed the display and not have 
left it to chance and the printer. He should have 
made an intelligent layout and done all his choos- 
ing of type, borders, size, etc., before calling in 
the printer. 

** Doesn't the printer know his own business 
better than I do T ' some will say. Yes, but he does 
not know your business or your problems. 

To the man who buys spark plugs the Champion 
Spark Plug advertisement is nothing more, at 
first glance, than another Champion advertise- 
ment. 

The real reason behind the advertisement — 
the new improvement in the goods — is not shown 
at first glance. This feature is the copper gas- 
kets. 

I have made a revised layout which I believe 



MAKING MESSAGE QUICK AND SURE 135 

contains considerably more interest. The vital 
message is more dominant. 

As the name of the goods is not mentioned until 
the fourth line we change the location of the name 
plate. This also makes for a better division and 
arrangement of color in the advertisement. 

My idea of finding a real selling point and mak- 
ing this point quick and sure is contained in the 
Lisk Mfg. Co. advertisement. 

In this case it was a matter of instructing the 
artist who lettered the headline '' Self-Basting. '* 

Any woman who has spent hours bending over 
and reaching into a hot oven to baste a roast will 
be immediately interested in this advertisement 
because of the emphasis of the self-basting fea- 
ture. 

And yet this was only one of many roasters ad- 
vertised in the same magazine. But many of the 
others either overlooked or did not properly dis- 
play this feature — self-hasting, 

Charles Austin Bates once said, ^'Find the one 
thing that makes your product a wee bit different 
from your competitors and advertise that.'' 

But the advertisement builder must be on the 
alert to see that artists, printers, engravers, etc., 
get this selling point over. His must be the guid- 
ing hand. 



hampion 

'TOUDO kMOC rO» TMI WnOU WORLDS TKA»C° 

Dependable^ Spark Pluqs 





Those Copper Gaskets 

Are Asbestos-Cushioned 

To Save the Porcelain 

If your porcelain insulator breaks, your spark plug is out of business. 

There's nothing for it but a new insulator or a new plug. 

The rapid succession of explosions in your cylinders beat with full 
force on the shoulders of the insulators of your spark plugs. 

Champion plugs are made with two asbestos-cushioned copper gaskets, 
Cpatetited f?y us April 25, IQ16) to protect the porcelain _and prevent loss 
of compression. 

That IS one big, exclusive feature which accounts for the greater de- 
pendability of Champion Spark Plugs. 

And their greater dependability accounts for the fact t.iat more plugs 
of this type are in' use today than any other plug ever designed. 

And this same condition has existed for years. 



Champion Dependability and the 
reasons for it should be remembered 
when you replace the plugs in your 
motor. 

There is a Champion Plug designed 
especially to serve the particular kind 



of motor you have in your car. 

Your dealer knows which Champion 
you need. 

Be sure the name "Champion" is 
on the porcelain— not merely on the 
box. 



Champion Spark Plug Co., 610 Avondale Avenue, Toledo, Ohio 




THOSE COPPER GASKETS 

Are Asbestos-Cushioned To Save the Porcelain 

If y6u\ porcelain insulator breaks, your spark plug is out of business. 
There's nothing for it but a new ins'ulator or a new plug. 
The rapid succession of explosions in your cylinders beat with full 
force on the shoulders of the insulators of your spark plugs. 




hampion 



Dependable Spark Pluqs 

LhaJnpion plygs are made with two asbestos-cushione(f copper gaskets, 
(patented by us A^i il 2$ IQ16J to protect the porcelain and prevent loss 
of compression. 

That is one big, exclusive feature which accounts for the greater de- 
pendability of Champion Spark Plugs 

And their greater dependability accounts for the fact that more plugs 
of this type are in use today than any other plug ever designed. 

And this same condition has existed for years 

Champion Dependat>ility and the Df motor you have in your car. 
reasons^ for it should be remembered Your dealer knows whicffCharapion 

whrn you replace the plugs m your you need, 
motor Be sure the name "Champion" is 

There IS a Champion Plug designed on 'he porcelain-^nol merely on the 

jspeciqlly to serve the particular kind 'jox. 

Champion Spark Plug Co., 610 Avondale Avenue. Toledo, Ohio 



Your Christmas Turkey Will Be Deliciously 
Roeisted from Drumstick to Wing if You Use a 




Lisk Long-Service Household Utensils 



Enameled Coffee Percolator 

A new enameled percolator at a moderate price. 
Seamless steel pot with four coats of Turquoise Enamel. 
Nickel plated cover ; glass, lop. Heavy pure aluminum 
coffee receptacle and pump. Sanitary Attractive, 

Enameled Double Boiler or Steamer 

Inset with perforations for steam. Cooks two dishes at 
once. Labor saving; fuel saving. Use it for New Eng- 
land Dinner, Sauerkraut and Sausage, and (or pud- 
dings, dried fruits, vegetables, etc. Two sizes. 

Lisk Ware is Sold by the Leading Hardware and Housefurnishing Stores f^^ 
Run No Risk — Be Sure It's Lisk 

THE LISK MANUFACTURING COMPANY. Ltd 
Canandaigua, New York 




Nickel Plated Tea Kettle 

Ask your dealer for the Lisk heavy nickel plated cop- 
per tea kettle \^ilh the Steel Ring around the bottom. 
Protects the keltle just where the wear comes. 

Anti-ftust Wash Boiler 

The famous original non-rusting boiler In addinon to 
the anti-rust construction it has all the special conven- 
ient features: Hook Handles make it easy to empty — 
Seamless Cover, no sharp edges to cut the hand, no 
Clacks to rust — Soap Shaver — Hook-on Cover 

aidware and Housefi 



^mn 



V 



k 



Does price cheapness make 
a preservative 
more desir- 
ablef 




Nature was certainly good to the Pond 
People last winter, and the makers of hy- 
i;eic ice cannot compete with Nature — in 
price*. But in. cleanliness, healthfulness 
and lasting qualities they can. 

Thcrc'foro, it is a question whether nat- 
ural ice is cheaper than Hygcic Ice — after 
all. 

Orders are being recorded for future de- 
livery. 



140 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

My idea of a first glance without any definite 
meaning of any kind is the Hygeic Ice advertise- 
ment. The illustration is as suitable for several 
other products as it is for ice. The idea of clean- 
liness (and I admit that this advertisement has a 
cleanly appearance) could still be retained if a 
strong heading such as ''Is Pond Ice Really 
Cheap r^ were used at the top of the advertise- 
ment. 

It needs something dominant. 

I realize that the copy in the advertisement is 
weak and flat but I use it for showing methods of 
display only. 

Now we come to the Crow-Elkhart advertise- 
ment. The original shows an elaborately hand- 
lettered heading. This is undoubtedly very 
expensive. 

Isn't it a fact that automobile prospects are 
solicited to a point of boredom with stories of 
truly wonderful cars? Isn't the story itself more 
interesting? 

The first paragraph of this copy tells a startling 
and interesting fact. Why is not this fact in 
itself a better heading! And by eliminating this 
handlettering at the top we give the goods — the 
automobile — a chance. 

There is another thing about this advertisement 



MAKING MESSAGE QUICK AND SURE 141 

which is like many in this respect, and that is — 
why use the name plate for an ultimate climax? 
Would a salesman save the name of his goods for 
an ultimate climax f 

In my revision I have tried to get a more logical 
display, a better grouping, and therefore a more 
interesting and appealing display at first glance. 
Notice the re-arrangement of the bottom part. 

The copy in the Trenton Potteries advertise- 
ment makes no effort to sell the ''Si-Wel-Clo" 
closet. You would not believe this statement by 
a first glance at the original advertisement. 

The copy is selling "Impervio China'' and 
^' Ideal Porcelain" for all plumbing. It is trying 
to create a demand on the plumber for these 
goods. 

We, therefore, see no reason for the illustra- 
tion of the closet. We realize that there is a lot 
of cumulative value in the name ^ ^ Si-Wel-Clo ' ' 
and we would retain the trade-name cut. In the 
final analysis it is the name on which a prospect 
should be sold — the specially designed name. 

And because this closet section of the copy is a 
sort of a postscript, why not treat it as such and 
put it at the bottom? 

We believe our revised layout gives the head- 
ing a real chance to be seen, connects the main 




During Nine Years— almost the lifetime: 

of the industry — Martin E. Crow has 

built this SAME CHASSIS! 




No^ Custom Made in Cav-Op^^-^notSc^ /9/7 g'-c^t fediure 







Poll 0.7 Spuut. B.O.. 



See Crow- Elkhat-V Cai^ a*^ /Ml Automobile Shows 



^ CROW- ELKHART r^^OTOR CO. 

Dept.S., ELKHART, INIV 




THE TRENTON POTTERIES CO, 



SILENT CLOSET 



Just as truly as you're living, he'll be back 
— if you don't "make sure you have the 
right kind of plumbing in the first place. 

And every reset water closet, every kitchen sink or laundry rub he replaces, will make you 
wish you had heeded our word and bought goot/ plumbing For the plumber's time is almost 
half your expense, and no plumbing fixture we make will cost as much as an inferior one, 
plus replacement, plus plumber's time. 

THE TRENTON POTTERIES COMPANY 

'Itnpervio" China and ''Ide^r Porcelain 

15 Virtually a home insurance. So hard is the glaze baked on that any amount of service will 

not mar its beauty and usefulness. A dampened cloth removes any dirt easily because of this 
density of the glaze. Pure white, glistening "Impervio" China and "Ideal" 
Porcelain will make your bathroom, kitchen apd laundry showrooms of 
your home. This is not necessarily true of all plumbing fixtures. All clay 
plumbing fixtures have not the same durability and richness of glaze. There 
is only one way to be sure of getting the right kind. 
Our interesting and Specify the ware of a reliable manufacturer and look for 

r i - j - n - r i Tn i '"Ba'throomsofC^r: the trade-mark before installing. 

eC^^mn tnllLJ'J^tttlZ THE TRENTON POTTERIES COMPANY 

•^^^^^^^^ plutbfnf^f^ TRENTON. NEW JERSEY, U.S. A. 

AskforBookletP. 18 MAKERS OF THE SILENT SI-WEL-CLO CLOSET 





When +be 
Plumber 
Com€5 
Bdck 






I— 




Our interesting 
and instructive 
book, "Bath- 
rooms c( Char- 
acter," will aid 
you in selecting 
therightplumb- 
ing fixtures. 
Ask for Book- 
let P.2. 



TRENtOM POTT£:R\e.S COMPANY 

IMPERVJO'Ch/WA and 

JJ deal" PoRCEt AlN 



Potteries corvip^r^Y 

'"'•fc.^s .HU^SI Wfi-tO J."l«-f Q=^fc+ 



THE TRENTOrJ POTTERIES CO. 

SILENT CLOSET 



146 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

idea of the copy with the heading and gives more 
force to the booklet. It also allows the use of 
proper margins between type and rules and gives 
us more room to use larger type. Fancy type 
faces are difficult to read at best and the small 
sizes are still more difficult w^hen not properly 
leaded or spaced. 



CHAPTER VII 

PICTURES AND ENGRAVINGS 

The Forceful Educational style of advertise- 
ment is really a little story from real life and, 
therefore, a good picture should be used with this 
style of advertisement whenever possible. It 
helps attract the reader and also makes the read- 
ing easier. 

Some advertisement stories are very far- 
fetched, and for that reason should be treated as 
the magazine editors treat fiction— use wash 
drawings. 

Whether the picture should actually be a wash 
drawing, a crayon drawing, a photograph or a line 
drawing is something that must be decided by the 
nature of the appeal and the medium in which it 
is to appear. 

It is simply a matter of taste as to whether the 
wash drawing in the Valspar advertisement is 
better than the crayon drawing in the Alexander 
Hamilton Institute advertisement. I prefer the 
crayon treatment because it is not so common- 
place. 

147 




& me by Yalmbne & Company 



He wanted to make sure 
the Varnish was Valspar! 



ILTE had seen our advertisements 
■*• •■• picturing a man pouring boil- 
ing water on a V'alsparred table so he 
decided to maie t/ie.iame test on his oiLm 
newly vamiihed floor 

This little scene actu- 
ally took place. 



VALENTINE'S 



SEAR 



The family was very 

much startled — but they survived 

the shock. 

And so did the floor for it really iviJi 

Vahparred. 

Therefore, even the boiling water 

could not spot it white or harm it in 

the slightest. 

That's why Valsparred floors are so 
desirable— to clean them you simply 



The Vvmsla TTiar Won't Turn Whit* 



wash them with hot water— even hot 
soapy water. 

Thus our friend thoroughly satisfied 
himself on two points — 

Fint, that our adver- 
tising claims for Val- 
spar are true, and 
Second, that he got 
Valspar Varnish on his 
floor ai ordered. 

And so, this man, like many others who have 
tested Valspar, decided then and there to use 
nothing else when varnish was needed. 
Valspar may be had from most good paint 
and vaniish dealers. You ivill knoiu luhere 
to buy it by the large posters in the Jeaters' 
-vjinJonxis 

Special Trial Offer 

Seed iu ten ccnis in sumps and we will forward a imall can 
of Valvar, enough to Bnish a small cbair or table. 



VALENTINE & COMPANY, 450 Fourth Avenue, New York City 

Largesl Manu/aclurers of High-gradt VamuKea in Uit World 
New York Chicato ...ot \/Al-EK|TINrC „.. 

Boston Toronto VArINISHLO 

ESTABUSHED 1852 




"He's in That 
Chair Because 

"He never slopped growing. Right now, he i 
getting ready to swing bigger deals than ever before 

"I'm going to follow the president's lead. 

"I'm going to prepare myself to swing big 
deals, too. 

"I'm going to make myself a power in thi$ 
business. 

" I'm going to get hold of the knowledge and 
the training that other men are using to make 
themselves successful. 

"I'm going to enroll, today, for the Modern 
Business Course and Service that the president 
is always talking about." 

Here are a few of the presidents who are using 
and recommending the Modern Business Course 
and Service: H. C. Osborn, President. Ameri- 
can Multigraph Sales Company; S. G. Mc- 
Meen, President, Columbus Railway & Light 
Company; George D. Locke, President, Kan- 
sas City and Memphis Railway Company ; C. 
R. Hardy, President, Rock Falls Manufactur- 
ing Company; Alfred I. duPont. President, 



DuPont Powder Company; W S. MacGlashan, 
President. The Beaver Board Companies; 
Melville M. Mix, President, Dodge Mariufac- 
turing Company; C. Edwin Michael, President, 
Virginia Bridge and Iron Company. 

The Modern Business Course and Service is a »Kort 
cut lo the broad Itnowledge that makes a large part of the 
difference between the president and his subordinate. 

It covers advertising, selling, financing, accountiug, 
credits, banking, correspondence and commetcial law. 



leade 



of America 



It is big enough for the bu 
It is not too big for those who expect to be numbered 
among the leaders of tomorrow. 

It Is thorough, pi-aclica! and interesting. 

Your position and income two years from now de. 
pend on what you do now. You will get suggestions 
that will help you by sending now for "The Abil«y to 
(Handle Men" and full information about the Modern 
Business Course and Service. 

Simply request it on your business leHethead, or use 
the attached coupon. 




Alexander Hamilton Institute 



19 A.tor Place, New York City 



obligation »rnd mt your book. 'Tht Ability lo H.ndlt Mtn." «nd full 
ce. (\Vrilc your namf . addrcw and butinnt position briow.) 




''It Never Slips, BilV 

That is the expression you will always 
hear from the man that uses a 

GOES WRENCH 

It can't slip. The tough semi-steel jaws 
grasp the nut or bolt head in a vice-like 
grip. There is no give or spread to the 
jaws that "chews" the nut when heavy 
pressure is exerted. Put all your weight 
on the handle. You cannot bend or break it, 
and the jaws wiH-iiot slip. 

When you buy a wrench, be sure and say — 
"Goes." 

GOES WRENCH COMPANY 

Worcester; Mmc., U. S. A. 

Agents: 7. C. HcCarty & Co., 29 Murray St., Kew York. 
John H. Graham & Co., 113 Chambers St., Kew York. 



PICTURES AND ENGRAVINGS 151 

Many pieces of copy are not so fictitious. These 
are best illustrated with photographs of live 
models. Men, women and children of any age 
or type can be secured to act the picture for illus- 
trating the story in the advertisement. 

Many railroad men will look at the Coe's 
Wrench advertisement as it now stands and say, 
''None of the boys ever said that.'' AVhereas 
a real photograph of two of "the boys" would 
have helped to prove that "the boys" did say so. 
Your message is much more convincing with 
photographs of live models. 

With an ordinary kodak and a few hours' time, 
a photograph of two real railroad men could have 
been secured for the same cost as the drawing 
used in the Coe's wrench advertisement. 

If you do not as yet believe that real live model 
photographs are the coming thing in advertising 
just look at the boy and cake picture. 

I have never seen a drawing of a boy that could 
compare with this photograph for real action. 
This is a perfect piece of acting and only a few 
parents will miss it. 

Swift & Co. once ran a series of advertisements 
which used dealers' photographs and their testi- 
monials. The one shown here has been in my data 
files for some time. 



PICTURES AND ENGRAVINGS 153 

As an idea this scheme has great possibilities 
when it can be used in the dealer's locality. Mrs. 
Jones will be interested to see the likeness of her 
tradesman whether she admires him or his meth- 
ods or not. Mr. Tradesman will get a warmer 
feeling for the advertiser also. His picture in 
the papers is no small event! Most of us are 
human. 

Live people are interested in other live people. 
This is partly why the movies are more popular 
than the art galleries. 

My idea of an ideal illustration is that used 
in the Hammermill Bond advertisement. This is 
a photograph in the foreground, and a crayon 
drawing background put in by an artist. This is 
the best method because the background can be 
subdued in the picture and the emphasis placed on 
the photograph of model wdth the goods. 

Many photographs and pictures have no con- 
trast between the background and the picture it- 
self. This produces a flat and uninteresting 
whole. 

When it comes to showing the goods themselves, 
try to use a real photograph with as little re- 
touching as possible. This is seldom possible, 
however, because most advertisers want to see 
their goods idealized- 




'It is not necessary to 
parboil this ham be- 
fore broiling or frying" 



Potter's Grocery & Market 
3532 Indiana Avenue Chicago 




"Swift's 
Premium" 
Ham 

Put " Swift's Premium 
Ham directly into the 
frying pan or onto the 
broiler, and it will re- 
tain its original delight- 
ful flavor and will not 
be salty. Try it. 

Swift (^Company 



ife 



) 





Written by a 
rw^* I 1 t« Treasurer 

"They call me a Tightwad" 

We have a lot of young enthusiasts running depart- 
ments, who would drive us into bankruptcy in a year if 
I didn't pose them on th^ carpet about once a month and 
put the fear of the Banl'. Balance into their souls. The 
President is the worst of the lot. "Get results ! " he yells; 
"hang the cost." 

The advertising manager, in his expansive, free handed 
way, was going to send out one hundred thousand form 
letters on our best, lithographed, 18c a pound stationery. 
After a few kind words from me, he found a splendid 
paper, firm and fine in texture, with a quality feel and 
rattle, that costs less than 9c a pound, east of the Missis- 
sippi. We didn't save any money for he sent out twice as 
many letters instead. That shows what I have to contend 

with. The paper is 
Hammermill Bond 
form let- 



115(8)80© .";:...-. 

Send for a valuable book, "The Signal System," and for 
a big portfolio of samples in 12 colors, including forms, 
letterheads, etc., suited to your business. Please mention 
your business and position. 

HAMMERMILL PAPER CO., ERIE, PA. 



*g»«**4 



I0« EACH 



Also made in 

lOctabletsby 

Western 

Tablet Co. 

St Joseph. 



/ 







Send for cata- 
logue with actual 
color plates 



1 M©<ii[p[?ll®XS 1 


1 ioMSM m^©m 1 



Mills at 
Dulufh 
Minnesota 



IN A HUNDRED COLOR COMBINATIONS 

Klearflax Linen Kugs add a new and distinctive touch to every room. 
They are made in pleasing color combinations, and decorators are 
now using them extensively. They lie flat, won't wrinkle like 
other rugs. Reversible and washable. Outwear the old kind. 



WESTERN RUG CO., 212 Fifth Ave., New York 



PICTURES AND ENGRAVINGS 157 

The Klearflax Rugs advertisement is one case 
where very little retouching has been used. The 
furniture in the background furnishes a natural 
setting for the rug and adds wonderfully to the 
interest in the entire picture. 

There are six methods of making a halftone: 
They are the Square, 

Silhouette, 
Vignette, 
Phantom, 
High light, 
Combination. 

The Valspar picture is a square halftone. 

The Klearflax picture is a silhouette halftone. 

The McKay Table Pad advertisement uses a 
vignette back of the table. 

Vignettes are supposed to fade the picture into 
the paper. On the fast moving presses which 
print magazines the fading scheme is seldom suc- 
cessful. It seldom gives good results. 

For letterpress, booklet and catalogue work, 
where the presses move more slowly and more 
time is taken to make the plate ready to print, 
the results are excellent. 

The two portraits shown give an idea for some- 
thing that can be substituted for a real vignette. 




i^ McKay Ventilated Table Pad 

Spill a Gallon of Hot 
Qravy 

on the surface of a MeKAY Table Pad, and not a drop ol it 
will reach your table, nor will any of It be absorbed by the 
pad. When your meal Is over, the surface of the pad may be 
washed clean with soap and water, or a wet cloth without re- 
tfDOxIng It from the table and not a trace of the liquid will 
remain. This Is but OXE of the exclusive features of this pad 

Asbestos lined air chambers throughout the body of the 
pad, providing a circulation of air that absorbs and carries 
away the heat, keeping the pad dry and sanitary, and at the 
same time entirely heat-proof. By simply Inverting the pad. 
the beautiful felt (or flannel) bottom makes an excellent card 
table out of your dining table. A positive guarantee that 
your table wUl not be injured by heat or hot liquids while 
covered by a McKAY TABLE PAD. 

Leaves and luncheon mats made In the same manner. 
Do not buy your table pad or luncheon mats until you have 
Been these, accept no sub^titvte. 

Write us for samples, booklet, etc. 

LYDON BRICHER MFG. CO. 

231 Central Ave., Minneapolit, Minn. 



Cool silky gauze 

Imagine how delightfully cool your foot wouia be with only 
half-an-ounce of sock on it. Yet you can enjoy this cool comfort 
without giving up good wear if you get 

No. 599-Only 25c 

(East of Rocky Mountains) 

This gauze sock is so completely reinforced every place where 
Chere is wear, that it gives surprisingly long service. Its silken, 
soft finish makes a handsome appearance on the foot. No. 599 
will prove that you can get good wear in a gauze sock. 

Order some direct from us, if you don't kno%v of a nearby 
Iron Clad dealer — we send package postpaid. Colors: 
Black, White. Heliotrope. Dark Grey and Palm Beach. 
(These colors are made with aniline dyes and fully cov 
ered by our "Iron Clad Guarantee.") Sizes 9 to UJ-j. 
Price 25c, east of Rocky Mountains. Be sure to state 
size ar)d colors wanted. 

You ought to have our huidsoine catalog 
—not an ordinary booklet, but a splendidly printed 
display of Iron Clads for the whole family. Illus- 
trations in full colors; write for free copy 

COOPER. WELLS & CO. 
2 1 2 Vine Street. St. Joseph, Mich. 




^ "'O " • '^l^p^^^ ».«T. OFF |g^ 




PICTURES AND ENGRAVINGS 159 

This sharp, hand-tooled finish always repro- 
duces well. 

The Iron Clad hosiery advertisement utilizes 
the phantom halftone. So does the McKay Table 
Pad advertisement. 

Phantom halftones are sometimes the work of 
the artist on the drawing and sometimes the ma- 
nipulation of a regulation halftone picture by the 
engraver. It always requires close cooperation 
between artist and engraver. 

The phantom effect can be produced entirely 
in line. This fact is proven in the Auster Tcn- 
neau Shield advertisement. 

The gray shoe line which gives the phantom 
effect in the Iron Clad hosiery advertisement is 
partly silhouette halftone and partly high-light 
halftone. 

The background of the White Horse Scotch 
advertisement is a high-light halftone. 

This method is a line drawing in black ink on 
white paper. Then a cut is made, using a halftone 
screen of dots between the drawing and the plate 
which chops the lines into dots. The plate is then 
etched to a depth that will produce the desired 
gray color. 

These exhibits do not reproduce very clearly 
because it is very difficult and seldom satis- 



liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiyiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir.111111111111^ 



AN IDEAL GIFT 
FOR A MOTORIST 

Every touring car owner •will appreciate this perfect ton- 
neau shield, which affords complete protection from dust, 
wind and backdraught for those in the rear seats. There is 
no better gift for your motorist friend than an 

AUSTER TONNEAU SHIELD 

And why not equip your own car? You protect your 

chauffeur with a front shield why not provide all-the-year 

comfort for yourself, your family and your guests in the 
tonneau? 

It is easily attached to any car, old or new. It folds up out 
of the way w^hen not wanted, but is ready for instant use 
Vk^hen needed. It allow^s you to enjoy the sun Vk'hile com- 
pletely sheltered from the wind, or, with the top up, you 
are closed in securely from the w^orst of storms. 

The Auster Tonneau Shield is sold on a 15 day trial basis. 
Write for Special Pamphlet No. 1302, or apply at either ad- 
dress for practical demonstration. 

FRYER-AUSTER COMPANY 



Sole American 
Main Office and Factory 
19 Pine Street • 
Providence, R 



Manufact 



r e r s and Owners 
New York Show Rooms 

1733 Broadway 
New York City. N. Y. 




AN AUSTERIZED PACKARD: The Manufac ^ 

turers of Packard, Owen, Pierce- Arrow, Marmon ^ 

and other high-grade cars recommend the Auster = 

Tonneau Shield as special equipment. = 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 








d ^v-'i 







ALL thai arc desirous to pass from : 
EDINBURGH to LONDON, or any 
other place on their road, let them 
repair to the WHITE HORSE CELLAR', 
in EDINBURGH, at which place they may be 
received in a STAGE COACH every Monday 
and Friday, which performs the whole jomney 
in eight days (if God permits), and sets forth 
at five in the morning. 

Allowing each passenger 14 pounds weight, 
and all above, 6 pence per pound. 

Ftbniary. ns^. 



MACKIE&COXDistillersltd, 

Glasgow and London 
Henry E.6ourd. Agent USA 







^<^ 



The delicate orchids which 
yield the vanilla bean are 
sometimes destroyed by trop- 
ical hurricanes— as was the 
1915 crop — and sometimes 
injured by other causes. Only 
second grade beans are pro- 
duced during such years. As 
none but the first grade is used 
in Burnett's Vanilla, a re- 
serve stock is kept to assure 
its uniform high quality. 

Syrian Parfait 

^cald I pint cream and let 
It stand \i hour, on Vj lb. 
fresh ground coffee. Cream 
yolks of 6 eggs with ]i lb. 
sugar. Beat well, add coffee 
mixture and stir to cream- 
iness over boiling water. 
Strain, add Jo pint cream 
and 2 teaspoonfuls 
Burnett's Vanilla. Beat 
over ice and freeze. 



i^^a^ 




What you should 



get in your 
Vanilla 

i'ou should get that rare and 
wonderful flavor which Nature 
puts into just one kind of vanilla 
bean — that grown in the moun- 
tain valleys of Mexico. All the 
efforts of science to cultivate 
vanilla elsewhere have failed to 
produce the equal of the bean 
grown in that favored spot and 
cured by the slow native proc- 
ess. No maker of cheap 
extracts can afford to use these 
beans, even though enough of 
them were to be had. This rare 
crop is small and over one-half 
of its choicest is used in 






For desserts, in which flavor is all important, it 
is surely shortsighted to use anything but the 
best flavoring. The e.xquisite delicacy and con- 
centrated goodness of Burnett's Vanilla have 
made it the standard among discriminating 
cooks for three generations. 

DESSERT BOOK -FREE 

Send lis your grocer's name and we will mail yon a copy 
of "115 Daimy Desserts." It is iiiterestinj and helpful. 

Joseph Burnett Company 

36 India -St., Boston, Mass. 



PICTURES AND ENGRAVINGS 163 

factory to make a halftone from a halftone. 
The screen in the halftone being used for copy 
crosses with the screen in the cut being made 
from this copy and produces a calico effect, which 
is a good point to remember in sending copy 
to an engraver. I believe, however, that the 
reader will be able to distinguish the different 
methods. 

The Burnett Vanilla advertisement is a com- 
bination halftone — part halftone and part line 
cut all in one plate. This entire advertisement is 
an excellent example of the Forceful Educational 
style. The pictures, the lettering and the arrange- 
ment are all in excellent taste and the message is 
clear cut and convincing. 

The Phoenix Silk Hosiery advertisement is also 
a combination halftone. The faces, feet and 
hands are in halftone, the rest is line work. A 
regulation black and white drawing of the letter- 
ing is made and the engraver makes a positive 
instead of a negative which produces white on 
black instead of black on white. 

Black backgrounds, unless the lettering is pro- 
portionately large, will be hard to read. Any- 
thing hard to read may be pretty but it is seldom 
good advertising. 




CrkmirkVt SPORTSMAN'S 

V><U1111U1 t FIRST ESSENTIAL 
Feet Stand Hardest Knocks. Protect Them With 

WitcH-Elk Boots 



WitcHell-SHeiU Company. - 



PICTURES AND ENGRAVINGS 165 

The artist has gone over all of the photograph 
in the Phoenix Silk Hosiery advertisement except 
the hands, faces and hose with a special shadow 
treatment. This is an excellent idea because it 
focuses the attention on the goods advertised, 
and this particular shading is very attractive to 
the casual reader. 

Such devices as these help the engraver to give 
a wide variety of effects with the six halftone 
methods. 

The Witch-Elk Boots advertisement proves that 
type can also be shown white on black as well as 
handlettering. It is seldom as satisfactory how- 
ever. One or two words of white on black will 
usually turn out very well and be very distinctive. 
This method is most effective when used spar- 
ingly. The better magazines, however, stipple 
(or gray) any black cuts and this often makes a 
very unsatisfactory result. 

A good use of a black background is shown in 
The Liberty Paper Company advertisement on 
page 35. This is really a reverse plate — a cut 
made from a proof of the type line and made 
white on black instead of black on white. 

A clean, sharp line cut is the best possible pic- 
ture for newspaper advertisements. Halftones 
in newspapers should be avoided. 



PICTURES AND ENGRAVINGS 167 

Where possible, make a silver print from the 
photograph and then make a line drawing from 
this silver print. From this a line cut can be 
made, and in the making the shades and tones 
which will give the gray halftone effect can be 
put into the cut by use of the Ben Day treatment. 

By this treatment, regular and irregular dots, 
lines at all angles, textures and spatters can be 
put into various parts of the line cut. And the cut 
will print on any kind of paper. 

The cut of the book ^'A Thinking Hand'' shows 
one style Ben Day dot put over all except the let- 
tering. This dot eifect could just as well have 
been a fancy texture, a series of vertical or hori- 
zontal lines or one of many other designs. It 
would also be possible to use several of the Ben 
Day patterns on this one cut. Some cuts have as 
many as a dozen Ben Day designs. Ask your en- 
graver to show Ben Day samples. 

You can take an ordinary line cut and put a 
different texture or screen in various parts of it. 
This will produce a gray halftone effect that is 
sure to print on any paper. 

The Packard advertisement shown in the Chap- 
ter ''The Classification of Type Faces" has a 
Ben Day border. 




How to Buy a 

Tea Set 



Two hundred patterns in tea sets ! Suppose you could see 
them all together — wouldn't it help you to find exactly the 
set you are looking foi ? 

You can see them all together at the Gorham stores. You 
may compare and price them in an absolutely unhurried 
way. 

Patterns range from simple Colonial and Georgian designs 
to the elaborate silverware of the Louis XV and Louis 
XVI periods. You may thus secure a tea set that will 
harmonize with any dining room or drawing room. 
Prices from $105 to $5075. 



PICTURES AND ENGRAVINGS 169 

Many excellent effects for newspaper adver- 
tisements are obtained, however, without the use 
of any special treatment of the line cut. Some 
artists make a specialty of line drawings, and the 
detail and color that they can get into a picture 
are remarkable. 

The Gorham Company once ran a series of sil- 
verware advertisements which had some sharp, 
clean, and most distinctive line cuts. One of this 
series is shown in this chapter. 

The Creange & Walter is another clean-cut and 
distinctive example. Here the entire work has 
been done by the artist. The entire advertisement 
is so clean, so well-balanced and so different, that 
it stands more than an even chance of getting a 
reading^ 

As a final exhibit to show what wonders can 
be done in lines only one of Franklin Booth's 
drawings for the ^olian Company is reproduced. 

This is not a woodcut but a woodcut effect. 

I wonder why more woodcuts are not used. At 
one time they were the only cuts used, and it seems 
strange that advertising men do not use them 
more often even now. They are surprisingly in- 
expensive. 

The subject of a woodcut is drawn or traced on 
hard, specially prepared wood, and then all of 



170 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

the wood around these lines is cut aAvay. This 
leaves the shading and sharpness in the hands of 
the engraver. For clean, fine lines, that combine 
well with the Forceful Educational style and the 
Handlettered style, woodcuts offer an excellent 
medium for obtaining novel beauty. 

Ask your engraver about woodcuts when you 
are on the *'path" for something different. 




i^^fflBR 




Les Arts Industriels 
China Leather Glass Wood 

As we opened here Ute m November, everything 
in stock is new -and of the latest design. 

Stormy weather last week having prevented 
many from visiting this unique shop, we shall con- 
tinue for another week our special introductory 



at very decided reductions 

Handsome dinner kU in grejtviriety, from the 
world fjmou! pottt'rtei of EngUnd, Fran<T,ind Italy, 
are (eaturet (or thii week. A great part of tire deco- 
rated ware ii in open stock. 
A bnlliini diaplay of beau- Tooled leather, which, 
Venetian glass is ready/ covering an ISK gold b 



Sernce Plmtea. B.<h Piiie 
Gold Deiifn on l-ori' Be- 
t»eco Two Aciil Cold Bor- 
den. Royil Cro*n Hobeo- 



Tooled Lather Picture 
FramM, R.th i.nd Or.|in«l. 
)lt,uUr«i6jo No.JlI.JJ 




. bailteta — 
opalescent, bright colored, 
and Bluiining white and 
black. 

Parchment tamp shades 
are meet.ng with great favor, 
and the hghting fiiturej we 



ruddily, is fashii 
Tnto lovely jewel boies, port- 
folios, hand ^irrors, photo- 
graph frames, and stationery 

Nfany of the articles which 
we offer are exclusive and 
can be obtained here only. 
Come and see Us. 



CREANGE 6WALTER 

VJncIerson (jalleries HBlcI^. 
17East40thSt.. NewTorK 



FlofltlnA Garden. Enf1>i^ 
Ro<k Cry.ul. W.ttr L.ly 
D...|l..l6..ich...nd..metc, 
R.guUr »10 JO. Now »«J0 

Serrlce Pl»te«, Limogti 



en Tf-vi EngJ.ih Ch.oi. 
Complete, 17 Piecct. 
Regul.r »12.S0. No* l».S« 



Cryatal Serrlce PUtM. 

BeJuiilul Gold or Silver Bol- 
der Wnh J Ulieri Engrj-ed 
ReguUr »7«.00- Now J44.IK1 



Ltmoftes China EMnner 

Serrlce. Amstre Border 

Decor.l.on.OFen Sto<k, 107 

P.etei. 

Rerilir»si.7S. Now JM.70 




CHAPTER VIII 

COMBINING PICTURES AND TYPE FACES 

Some advertisement builders concern them- 
selves entirely too mnch with art work, and others 
concern themselves too much about the type face 
they intend using. 

A proper appreciation of values of each and a 
happy medium is the most desirable trait in a well- 
rounded advertisement builder. 

An advertisement may contain a beautiful 
illustration and yet be disorganized and uninter- 
esting — one weak in sales-effect. 

Again the type faces selected for an advertise- 
ment may be modern to the ^ith degree and per- 
haps easily read, but the advertisement does not 
have a clean-cut, finished, sales-producing appear- 
ance. 

The method followed by the more successful ad- 
vertisement builders is to plan the whole adver- 
tisement and make the type suit the illustration, 
or vice versa. 

The kind of advertisement you are building 
should determine what style of illustration as well 

173 




. (f Jiitker in summer eveniy\gs ycAi repair \ ^ 
Uo taste t/\e fivs(\ness of ifie purer air 

BEAUTY, grace, and joyful 
exhilaration become a happy 
realization when the rhythmic 
movement of the dance is accom- 
panied by gently swaying breezes 
from a G-E ELECTRIC FAN. 



.r. 









The G-E ELECTRIC FAN is the 
result of twenty years of experience in 
finding methods qf doing things the right 
way. It has the 'oscillating motion that 
most naturally and effectively distributes 
the air currents. 

It is so scientifically built as to prts, so 
perfectly balanced as to avoiding vibration, 
that its endurance assures a lifetime of 
service. 

Add to this efficiency, its economy — it 
can be run from three to four hours for one 
cent — and you have described the G-E Fan. 
Let the nearest electrical dealer or your 
lighting company show you one today. 

Always look for the big G-E Trade 
Mark on the face of the fan. It is a 
guarantee. 




COMBINING PICTURES AND TYPE FACES 175 

as what type face to use. By referring again to 
Chapter II notice the typ^ and pictures used for 
each style. 

Starting with the light-toned, fairy-like picture 
(which came into being because of the product and 
the season in which it was advertised), the builder 
of the General Electric advertisement could not 
have selected a more appropriate tjipe face. The 
complete advertisement is simply the Passive Edu- 
cational style with illustration, and the most 
perfect example, when product and season of 
publication are considered, that I have ever 
seen. 

The Universal Portland Cement advertisement 
is another Passive Educational style with illus- 
tration. 

Owing, how^ever, to the fact that the photograph 
here is darker in color than the picture in the 
General Electric advertisement, a heavier type 
has been wisely used. This Delia Eobbia type 
has characteristics that blend beautifully with 
the spatter Ben Day border and the softness of 
the road shown in the picture. 

The principles of construction of both the Gen- 
eral Electric and the Universal Portland adver- 
tisements are identical. In the latter, however, 
the type face is heavier, and as the picture could 



ii^^l 



WHY should the country roads be tmpassable in winter? Why 
should the officials who are building and repairing the roads 
at your expense put your money into dirt or macadam roads? 
CONCRETE roads are comparatively low in first cost, hard, 
smooth and dustless. They are permanent because — 

They are not affected by weather, traffic, 
- or foreign material tracked upon them. 
Alternate freezing and thawing have no 
effect on them. 

Heat does not soften the binder, permining 
It to flow. 

Cold does not make it brittle, permitting 
it to chip. 

If you are interested in the solution of the good roads problem 
send for our free booklet pn the use of concrete in road consttuction. 

UNIVERSAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

CHICAGO PITTSBURGH MINNEAPOLIS 

Plants at Chicago and Pittsburgh :: ^nnual Output 12,000,000 Barrels 



COMBINING PICTURES AND TYPE FACES 177 

not be changed the other feature, the type, was 
chosen to fit this. 

There are only a few advertisements that are 
as ^* smooth'' in color as these two. This harmo- 
nious and beautifully blended style is the grow- 
ing idea among advertisement builders, but at this 
writing the pioneers only have the field. 

The irregular style of type combined with the 
irregular illustration and the irregular lettering 
make an excellent combination in the Eoamer 
automobile advertisement. 

The Forceful Educational style of advertise- 
ment must have a heading or some contrasting 
feature. Nevertheless this contrast need not be 
glaring and cheap. 

The heading and picture in the Dodge Brothers 
advertisement are both decidedly bold yet the 
complete result is harmonious and pleasing. The 
slightly heavy tone of the Bookman Old Style type 
used for the body of this advertisement is neither 
bold nor light, therefore it blends beautifully 
with the white space and bold portions of the ad- 
vertisement and also helps relieve the dense 
blackness of the illustration. 

This Bookman Old Style type also lends an air 
of reliability to the advertisement and the prod- 
uct because of its clean-cut, sturdy features. 




TN a gown by Paquin or Premet the quality 
^ of the materials is taken for granted — your 
interest centers itself on the felicity of the 
design. The same holds true of the ROAM- 
ER — it is built to satisfy an ideal, not to 
meet a price; and while it .has the mechan- 
ical genuineness of automobiles selling well 
above its price, its appearance is like no 
other car built in this country today. 




For the first time in the history of American 
automobile building it is now possible to secure a 
properly weighted motor car which has all the dis- 
tfncti6n'tif Such /oreign carS'as a Rolls-Royce or Sim- 
plex, of a Fiat or Lancia, of an Isotta Fraschini or a 
De Dion Bouton. For the first time in the ROAMER, 
the choice of color of body, upholstery and top are 
made entirely a matter of your personal taste. And 
for the first time, the purchase price makes owner- 
ship plausible for most of us; 

THE SPECinCATIONS: Roamer-Rutenber high speed motor, 
«bt crlinders; Bosch high tension magneto; Roamer-Stromberg carbureter; 
Bijur staning and lighting; Borg fit Beck clutch; WiUard storage battery; 
Grant-Lees transmission; Roamer-Hess axles; Guemey ball bearings (large 
i\it)\ Warner Autometer. Warner electric clock; Stewart- Warner warning 
signal; Houk wir6 wheels; hand buffed leather upholstery; Sukberger high- 
est grade hair in upholstering, with Marshall cushion springs; highest class 
domestic and imported rnotor cloth top materials; Boycc mocometer, Good- 
year cord tires. The ROAMER has the completeit equipment, including 
an extra wire wheel It is priced at $1850. 

A BOOK ABOUT THE ROAMER 
We wculd thank you to send for a beautifully illustrated brochure 
which tells much more about the ROAMER than is possible here. An 
Itninediate request precludes any danger of forgetting to send for it. 

The Barley Motor Car Co., 

•Streator, Illinoia 




Dodge Brothers 

WINTER CAR 



Of standard limousine height, 
the body has ample head- 
room; the doors open readily 
and swing wide, affording 
easv entrance and exit. 



These and many other details complete the 
comfort and enjoyment of this weatherproof 
Winter car, which in the Spring is quickly 
changed bacli to the open touring car or 
roadster. 



ur 



The motor is 30-35 horsepower 

The price of the Winter Touring Car or Roadster, 

complete, including regular mohair too. is $950 

If. o. b. Detroit) 
Canadian price $1335 (add freight from Detroit) 



Dodge Brothers. Detroit 




Husky Shoes For 
Rough Work 

Put your foot into comfort the next time you 
fit out for tlie woods. Get into a pair of our wet 
and cold excluders— Beacon Falls Leather Tops. 
They're roomy, not clumsy; even balanced and 
stand a tremendous amount of hard outdoor service 
in hunting or logging camp, in marsh, on farm. The 
rubber is new, fresh, elastic'. We sell no old 
stock. They, are heavily reinforced at every 
point wher^' strain and stress are liable to 
v^weaken them. Thousands put their confi- 
<dence in 




Leather Top Rubber Shoes 



ROCK ELM— This beauty 
comes in six heights, 8, 10, 
12, 14, 16 and 18 inch with 
chrome leather top. No heel. 
Heavy rolled sole. Abso- 
lutely waterproof — a good 
laster. You'll buy a second 
par after you've had hard work 
wearing the first out. Uppers made 
of pure gum txtra strengthened with 
ribbed toes. Rawhide laces— bellows 
tongue. Price about |4.50 for 10 inch 
.' t your dealer's. 

SHERMAN— This is identical with 
Rock Elm except it has a solid rubber 
heel, for which 25c extra a pair is 
charged. 



MANITOBA— This shoe is 
warranted not io crack or split. 
Nearly snag-proof. Uppers 
are exira qualify gum forced 
under great pressure while 
wajm into duck. Rolled 
soles of pure gum. Rubber 
heel. Chrome top. Rawhide 
laces. In 8, 10, 12, 14 and 
16 inch. Price for 10 inch at 
your dealers about S4.50. 

ff y»ur dealer hasn't them, write us 
his name. We'll supply you. Look 
for the " Cross " to be sure you Jet 
" Beacon Falls. " It's your safe- 
guard for quality. Booklet ( ) is 
waiting for you. Tells about rubber 
footwear ;or sportsmen and outers. 
Send for your copy now. 



Beacon Falls Rubber Shoe Co. 
BEACON FALLS. CONN. 



NEW YORK 
106 Duane Si. 



CHICAGO 

307 W. Monroe S«. 



BOSTON 

241 CondressSl 



COMBINING PICTURES AND TYPE FACES 181 

Compare the Beacon Falls advertisement with 
the Dodge Brothers advertisement. 

The contrast is greater in the Beacon Falls 
advertisement owing to the use of a lighter faced 
body type and the extremely heavy Winchell 
series for the headings. This is not a criticism 
of the Beacon Falls display, because this adver- 
tisement was undoubtedly used in a list of papers 
where strong contrast was desired. Most of the 
other advertisements in the same iDublication 
where the Beacon Falls advertisement appeared 
used extreme contrast and the readers were ac- 
customed to extreme contrasts. Hence the treat- 
ment of the Beacon Falls advertisement. 

The problem resolves itself into the choice of 
either harmonious beauty or contrasting strength 
in type face and illustration. It all depends on 
the plan, the product and the medium, as to which 
method is the most effective as a sales-agent. 

When the ultimate consumer is properly consid- 
ered and correctly analyzed, I can hardly see any 
reason for the choice of type and letter used in 
the Gillette advertisement. 

If the first heading were omitted and the cut 
with band behind it moved to top of the adver- 
tisement, the result would not be so crowded and 
unrelated. 



Welcomed hy 
WomenEveiYwhere 




"In French Ivory 
and Gold'— I4K. 
Gold Plate, 
of French Ivory 
lined with velvet 
and satin — your 

, Purple. 

Old Rose. Green or Old 



"Milad^^ecoriete (jilUite 



A GIFT that is new, 
unique, very 
much up to date. 
A beautiful addition to 
Milady's toilet table — 
and one that solves an 
embarrassing personal 
problem. 

Milady De'coUete 
Gillette is welcomed 
by women everywhere 



—now that a feature 
of good dressing and 
good grooming is to 
keep the underarm 
white and smooth. 

You C2m see it in the leading 
department stores, 4n drug 
stores, jewelry and" hardware 
stores. 

Ask your dealer — have him 
get it — or send direct to us. 
Say which color you prefer in 
lining of case. 

The price is $5. 



GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR COMPANY 

BOSTON 



i 

i 
i 

'i 

i 

i 

i 

i\ 

i 



'i 




'Milady decollete qilleUe 





At work and at play, 
out-doors and in, many 
and many a man's best 
friend is his Wellington 
Pipe. Get yours. 




THE UNIVERSAi- PIPE 



is made of genuine French 
Briar with a solid vulcanite 
bit Its well catches all 
moisture — insures 
a cool, clean, dry 
smoke — always. 



35c and up 
at good dealers 




WM. DEMUTH & CO, 

New York 



COMBINING PICTURES AND TYPE FACES 185 

In order to balance the cut at top, a band of 
gray could be run across the bottom of the ad- 
vertisement one-half the width of top band. In 
this band at bottom could be a white panel with 
the wording, ' ' The Happy Thought in Gifts. ' ' 

Then take the small descriptive matter and put 
in a panel where the wording above is now. This 
would relieve the entire advertisement of the con- 
gested appearance that is not in harmony with 
the copy. 

Instead of the heavy type for the reading mat- 
ter I would suggest the same Delia Eobbia type 
as used on the Universal Portland Cement ad- 
vertisement. This Delia Eobbia type is widely 
used and very appropriate for all advertisements 
of products sold to women. 

The picture in the Gillette advertisement is 
excellent and the border is in keeping with the 
season of publication, but the finished result is 
not attractive to the audience appealed to, owing 
to the bold body type, the superfluous first head- 
ing and the crowded appearance. 

I have tried to make a revision that corrects 
the faults outlined. 

Do not infer from this that I do not approve 
of bold body type. It is simply a matter of fitness. 

Wellington Pipe advertisement may be consid- 



l*'*^^ 



s 



7 



'\ 






k 



W 



THE Pleasant Bits of Life 

A bit of fine weather ... a bit of a stroll in 
the Champs Elysees ... a bit of love making, of 
leisure, of lightheartedness. Above all, a bit of a cigarette, hand- 
rolled, in the paper Riz La Croix. 

These are but bits of life and laughter . . . but, ma fox, what a 
pleasant life it is! Life in a spangle of sunshine . . . q-aelle vie, 
mes enfants! 

HIZ LA ^ 

(Pronounced: REE-LAH-KROY) 

FAMOUS CIGARETTE PAPERS 

are to be seen everywhere in the sunshine moments of happy days. 
They are the light little, tight little wrappers in which the epicure 
of life rolls his golden grains of joy, through which he puffs his 
aromatic cloudlets of content. ^^,^ 

One hundred and fifty million books of ..^^^-^""''''^ \ S^ 

such papers every year thus give ^.^-^^ii-''''''''^'^^ ^^^ 
up their earthly existence to ^..'^^H^^^^^Zs.^S*^ 

aid men's dreams of 



paradise. 

RizLa Croix 
bring pleas- 
ure because: 

They are 
strong. 

They are adhe- 
sive. Made from 
flax-bom linen, the 
edges adhere. 

They are light and 
thin. 'When they 
bum, no paper odor 
mingles with the 
fragrance of your 
tobacco. 



o^J 



FREE 

Tvo intereslinjj, 
illustrated Booldets - one 
about RiZ LA CROIX Cigarette Paoers. 
the other sho^wing \\o<s to Roll Your Own 
-cigarettes-sentany^rhereinU.S.on request Address 
The American Tobacco Co., Room (178. ill Fifth Ave., N.Y. 



COMBINING PICTURES AND TYPE FACES 187 

ered too black but I cannot agree to this. It may 
not be a perfect piece of work, but, with the ma- 
terial at hand, the builder of this advertisement 
has builded well. Lighter faced type would have 
made the top and bottom of this advertisement 
seem heavier and more disconnected. The bold 
name plate and the bold pictures are now tied 
together and the entire advertisement relieved of 
a spotty appearance through the use of the bold 
body type. 

In a book of this kind it is almost impossible 
to collect all the various types of art work and 
show all the various type faces that can be used 
to advantage with them. 

There is, however, one advertisement that I 
have saved that is an excellent example of the 
harmonious in the style of art and the type face. 
I refer to the particular Kiz La Croix advertise- 
ment shown here. AVith the exception of the two 
all-capital lines, the reading matter of this ad- 
vertisement is Cadmus, a type face seldom used 
but wonderfully appropriate to the French style 
of illustration in this advertisement. There are a 
number of other faces that would be satisfactory 
for this copy, but the Cadmus type is not only 
pleasing but distinctive owing to its restricted 
use. 



188 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

A type foundry specimen book is a handy thing 
to have around when you have to have something 
novel or something different and yet in harmony 
with the drawings used. 

Your printer may not always have the type you 
select for an advertisement but the author is con- 
vinced that to secure an effect like that of the Riz 
La Croix advertisement is w^orth buying a special 
face of type from the foundry. 

Many local advertisers do buy and use special 
type faces for all their advertising. In this way 
they obtain distinctiveness and a reputation for 
individuality. 

Some time ago I came across what I consider 
the criterion of unique distinctiveness in a local 
advertisement. It is the Gano-Downs advertise- 
ment shown on page 85. 

This copy has a distinctive type face — Tabard 
— a distinctive border — dot and dash — and a dis- 
tinctive illustration. They all have the same 
characteristics, and consequently the result is 
beautiful and interesting. Notice the handling of 
the display. Some advertisers consider that two 
faces of type are necessary for contrast. The 
Gano-Downs has harmonious contrast and is a 
striking combination, which will dominate any 
newspaper space, and only one type face. 



COMBINING PICTURES AND TYPE FACES 189 

What do you think of the ^'Gillette Razor ^Beau 
Brummer '' advertisement? Does this strike you 
as an excellent combining of picture and type? 
I like it very much. There is a series of these ad- 
vertisements and they are interesting in make-up 
and copy. The type used is Cheltenham Medium. 

This chapter would not be complete without a 
showing of the Kleinert Dress Shield advertise- 
ment. Here is a very delicate subject handled in a 
very bold manner and the entire composition of 
picture and type is very harmonious. Whether 
its heavy color will be repellent to the average 
woman reader is hard to say. There is, however, 
no disputing the distinctiveness of this advertise- 
ment. It is worthy of serious study. 

In conclusion: The plan determines the style 
of advertisement and the audience and medium 
determines whether you must make this style bold 
throughout for harmony, or light in tone through- 
out for harmony. Perhaps the plan determines 
bold headings for contrast with body matter (the 
Forceful Educational style). Maybe the contrast 
should be restrained as in the Beau Brummel 
advertisement, or loud as in the Beacon Falls ad- 
vertisement, or average contrast as in the Quaker 
Oats advertisement shown in the chapter '^The 
Kinds of Advertisements.'^ 



BEAV BRVMMEL 

a Single liair annoyed liim 




TBCMtC 



THAT greatest dandy of all 
times, Beau Brummel, set 
great value on the smooth- 
ness of his face. After shaving, 



his custom was to go over his 
face with a pair of nippers. H2drs 
that survived the razor were 
pulled out by the roots. 

Brummel wcis famous for his 
grooming at a time when good 
grooming was the exception 2md 
defects were covered with patches 
and paint. 

Today in any gathering of 
business men you will see the 
freshness of face and ruddiness 
of skin that is due to the tonic 
effect of a dsdly Gillette shave. 

Just lather briskly, rub in well: 
use the Gillette with an single 
stroke: dip the face in cool water 
and pat dry with a soft towel. 

A Gillette shave b quick and cool, safe and sani- 
tary. It is velvet-smooth, no matter how wiry the 
beard or tender the skin. Adjust the handle for a 
light or a close shave. A.keen, fresh blade Ls always 
ready. No stropping— no honing. Prices $5 to $50. 
Blades 50c to $1. the packet Dealers everywhere. 

GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR CO. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



No Stroppinff — No Honing- 




BRASSIERE GARMENT SHIELD 



Fresh Dress Shields every morning — this is possible if you wear 
the Tupair Brassiere Garment Shield. 

It is a perfect bust- supporting Brassiere equipped with two pairs 
of Kleinert's guaranteed Dress Shields which button on and off so 
that the changing from one pair of Shields to the other takes but 
a moment's time. 

Perfect dress protection with all the advantages of a perfect Bras- 
siere are combined in this garment as in no other. 

Ask to see the Tupair — a perfect -fitting Brassiere and two 
pairs of Kleinert's guaranteed Dress Shields for $1.00--all size*. 



CHAPTER IX 

BORDERS 

Borders have many uses. We are discovering 
new things every day about the physical features 
of advertising, and I trust the reader will be leni- 
ent in his criticism of my efforts to classify bor- 
ders and their applications. 

Here is my classification: 

Borders are used to make a complete unit of 
an advertisement that will cause it to stand out 
in a page against other advertisements. 

Borders are used to suggest a period of history 
in the goods or supply an atmosphere consistent 
with the goods advertised. 

Borders offer an opportunity to surround the 
message with a distinctive mark that cannot be 
found in any other advertisement. 

The Oriole Go-Basket advertisement uses a bor- 
der that is the most efficient in modern advertise- 
ments— Ji/5f two plain rules! They hold the ad- 
vertisement together and separate it from others 
on the same page, yet the border is hardly noticed ! 
It is simple. It fills the need and does not go 
beyond. 

193 




3 
O 



.ti ^ 6 <y (i5 



3 ---Ores a).ai »;; S 

•J ^tJ^S^ aSt^ 

o six "^ ^- ^'> 

tfi 9 -ffi ^ <i> -y bfl 



^ ^ CQ .ti " =: = u bfi 
<u ^ "73 c .2 O.- 



OQ 









■o 



biO bJD 



;^0^ 



1- c3 






CO 





BORDERS 195 

The Oriole Go-Basket is one of the best Force- 
ful Educational advertisements in this book — a 
strong heading, a strong connecting picture and 
an excellent trade name design, all separated with 
clean, easily read type. Study it. It is a real 
salesman in print. No frills, no fads; just plain 
selling. 

Now compare the Pneu-Form advertisement. 

This is not a poor advertisement by any means, 
but it does not get the same attention as does the 
Oriole Go-Basket advertisement. It has a dis- 
connected, incoherent appearance. The heading 
should be a trifle larger. Through the use of a 
size smaller body type, a border could have been 
used on this advertisement to as good effect as 
on the Oriole copy. 

There are numerous advertisements similar in 
conception to the Eichard Hudnut copy, but not 
quite as elaborate. This Hudnut advertisement is 
the most elaborate symbolical border that I have 
ever seen. It is expensive in first cost but most 
effective in creating the environment necessary 
to articles of this class. 

To my mind the Odo-ro-no border is not sym- 
bolical of anything special as it stands. It is, 
however, so distinctive as to mean Odo-ro-no at 
first glance if used consistently. In this way it 



Mail Your Figure 

To Your Dressmaker 

While you attend to social duties that are 
pleasanter and less fatiguing than standing 
by the hour to have your gowns fitted. Instead, you 
can send this smalj box to your dressmaker, and enjoy 
yourself while your whole wardrobe is being made. 

The Pneumatic Dress Form 

reproduces every curve and line of your figure — The 
Pneumatic Dress Form is inflated inside the fitted 
jacket lining, the rods are adjusted to your height — 
there is even a skirt marker, so that your skirt can 
be turned in to the proper length — and your gown, 
without even one try-on fits you per- 
fectly. One form serves entire family. 

THE PNEUMATIC DRESS FORM 
IS GUARANTEED FOR HVE YEARS 

Should any defect develop return form 
to us and we will correct the defect or re' 
place with a new form, without charge. 

Written guarantee with each Pneu Fomn. 

THIS MODEL — ► 
$12.50 

A price that includes Skirt Marker. Skirt f orm, 
Drafted-To'Measure Paper Lining Pattern — 
packed in unall box and prepaid anywhere in 
the U. S. Write for Booklet: "My Double." 

Pneumatic Dress Form Co. 
561 Fifth Avenue New York 



BORDERS 199 

will act to produce cumulative value that should 
pay the advertiser. It may be thought from these 
comments on the Odo-ro-no border that I encour- 
age the use of freak borders. Not at all. A freak 
border is a failure nine times out of ten. This 
particular advertisement has character, and when- 
ever you can produce a border with a distinctive 
character and use it consistently without crowd- 
ing the advertisement, you are producing cumu- 
lative value and good-will. 

The border in the Hotel Sherman advertisement 
is distinctive, but I doubt its power to produce 
character or cumulative value. It crowds the pic- 
ture and the copy and overshadows both. This 
border would not be so conspicuous in a full-page 
advertisement — four times the size of space used 
without increasing the thickness of the border. 
But for a quarter-page it is too dominant. It is 
too much in evidence. 

The border of an advertisement should never 
be so strong as to weaken the headline or picture. 
A border is '^ millinery'^ at best — an aid, not the 
chief. 

The border "Save 64%*' on the Sears-Roebuck 
advertisement has something about it that seems 
to say, "Read the next one, see if we are all 
alike. '* Nine people in ten will read the border 




^r^Mions^ 




m^umi 




A Pleasant Memory 

"....... And when you leave the Hotel 

Sherman, it will be with regret, tempered by 
fond anticipation of the happy day when you 
can return." — Elbert Hubbard, 

Hotel Sherman 

CHICAGO 

Rooms with bath ^2.00 upward. 
The Ice Skating Exhibitions in the College Inn, 
Hotel Sherman, are responsible for the present revival 
of Ice Skating throughout America. 

Randolph Street at Clark 
The center of the city's life 

Sctid for free color reproduction of the famous paint* 

ing by Maxfield Parrish, "Sing a Song of Six Pence." 

HOTEL SHERMAN COMPANY 



We want you to see for yourselves 
what the *• Handy Volume" Britannica is like 

Sign the cbupon oh this page and we will send you a pamphlet that give* 
you aU you can know about the books without actually seeing them. It contains 
color reproductions of different bindings, sample pages of text and illustrations, 
information about the price — cash or instalment — of set* in each binding, etc 
Send $1.00 with the coupon now to reserve a set. 

If i t is Cbnveiuent for you to go to any of the places listed below, you can see for 
yourself the actual "Handy Volumes" in the different bindings, look at print and 
illustrations, satisfy yourself on every point, and hand in your order. There is a 
full exhibit of the "Handy Volume" Britarmica at each of the following places: 



NEW YORK 

GiMBBL Brothers 

Charles Scrtoner's Sons 

Henry Malkan 

WASHlhteTON 

S. Kann Sons & Co. 

PHILADELPHIA 

CiMBEL^ Brothers 

NEWARK 

HahnbaCo. 

BALTIMORE 

The Norman, Remington Co. 

BOSTON 

W. B. Clarke Co. 

PITTSBURGH 

Joseph Horne Co. 

BUFFALO 

The W\l Hencerer Co. 

NEW ORLEANS 

Maison Blanche Co. 

MILWAUKEE 

GiMBEL Brothers. 



Pleas^f send me 

1 The booklet with full information about 
the'HANDYVOLUME-issueofthenew 

□ Encyclopaedia Bntannica, sample 
pages, bindmgs, prices, terms, etc. 
The booklet caUed "The Part the Ency- 
clopaedia Britannica Plays in the Allau-s 
rn of Ambitious Women," with sample 

I I pages and full information. 

3. Order form, which I will sign on receipt. 

□ Reserve one set for me. $1 enclosed 
as first payment. 

Name— — 



CHICAGO 

The. Fair 



ST. LOUIS 

Famous and Barr Co. 



CLEVELAND 

The Burrows Bros. Co. 



CINaNNATI 

Stewart & Kidd Co. 



ST. PAUL 

St. Paul Book a 
Stationery Co. 

INDIANAPOLIS 

Kautz Stationery Co. 

LOUISVILLE 

Dearing's. Lncorporated 

OMAHA 

j. L. Brandeis & S0N3 



SAN FRANCTSCO 

"The White House" 
Raphael Weill* Co., Inc. 

LOS ANGELES 

A. Hamburger & Sons, 

Inc. 

PORTLAND 
The J. K. Gill Co. 

SEATTLE 
LOWMAN& Hanford Ca 

SALT LAKE CITY 
Keith-O'Brien Co. 

DENVER 

A, T. Lewis & Son Dry 
Goods Co. 

KANSAS CITY 

Bryant & Douglas Book 
AND Stationery Co. 

DETROIT 

John Y. Sheehan & Co, 



For more information or to 
immediately mail the coupon to 



reserve a set 



Sears, Roebuck and Co. 

Chicago 
Stie Dittributon 




THE least common of common 
things in all the world is com- 
mon sense. Bargaining away his 
lY^;^ health in exchange for dollars is 
^S the crowning "business" foolish- 
j/^ ness of the business man of 
^^ this age. 

rp^ Why not arrange to get health 

|/>^ and the dollars, too? Money- 

JV"^^ making requires application; ap- 

v\^fa plication demands nervous en- 

0/j^^ ergy; nervous energy is impos- 

J<^ sible without good digestion, so 

r^^ just say to yourself "Ishkabibble" 

I/jM and join those who drink daily 

HALF STOCK ALE 

With Meals and on Retiring at Night 

PETER BARMANN 

BKEWERY 'PNONE 66 KINGSTON, N. Y. 







BORDERS 203 

all around and their eye will jump back to it when 
they try to read the copy inside. More "mil- 
linery.'' Too much attention value in border. 
It is quite true that this advertisement sold 
goods. Many pieces of poor advertising sold 
goods. But did they sell the maximum amount? 
Who knows how much money is never spent that 
should have been spent, just because all advertise- 
ments are not as logical, as clean and as well bal- 
anced as the Oriole Go-Basket advertisement! 

Whenever I am in doubt as to which kind of a 
border to use, I cut out all fuss and use plain 
rules. These seldom scream over the shoulders 
of the main message. 

I once heard an advertising man say that he 
left such small things to the printer. This is 
probably the worst of all methods. 

In sixteen years' experience I have met, man- 
aged and mingled with many printers, and a great 
many have an idea of fitness similar to that which 
produced the Peter Barmann advertisement. 

It is the hardest thing imaginable to get sim- 
plicity in advertisement building. Every me- 
chanic wants to use a new type face, a new border 
or some new ornaments. They reckon that its 
newness is synonymous with attractiveness. 

Of course we must not forget to show how the 




\|^* He II be pleased with -f^^. 
\h^ a pair of comfortable i^^ 

^MRISG/1RTERS|^ 

^ii enclosed in an artistic ^• 
J^ Holiday box. % 

;% A thoughtful gift — i,.^" 
\J~ acceptable — practical — 'U* 
^%i- economical. ^I"' 



•i-^ 



The double grip -'■*'" 



%}j' boxes are distinctly "'■"jI^. 

"^.,K different and very at- ^j| 

\i^; tractive. Give him one ^^ 

^j:-' pair of each kind. t^ 

t 



^ 25 and 50 cents 

"f^ A. Stein & Co. %^- 

^I'l? Maken \r 

^J,!/ Children s Hickory Garten { 

•^,ui Chicago New York 




BORDERS 205 

holiday spirit is conveyed in a border, hence the 
Paris Garter copy. This might just as well be 
holly leaves. 

The Indian Head advertisement shows a new 
trend in the use of borders. It is a fine idea, but 
the ribbon effect occupies too much space that 
should be used by the message in the copy. The 
elimination of the ribbon border at the right and 
bottom of the picture would have helped. 

This idea of getting trade-mark repetition in a 
border has great possibilities, so long as it does 
not overshadow the rest of the advertisement. 
The Hal Motor Car Company uses this same idea 
to impress the name upon the reader. They have 
overdone the matter by using a type line inside of 
the border. It is too confusing. 

A border's place is supplementary in the back- 
ground. When it becomes the chief attraction, the 
message is bound to lose some of its effect. Keep 
your border plain unless it means something defi- 
nite. When it has a definite reason give it room 
to express that reason. 



3T^ 




DIAN HEAD 



27.33 
36.40 
44 ins. 



The Growing 
Popularity of 
INDIAN HEAD 

The genuine "Indian 
Head" is rapidly grow- 
ing in favor for white 
dresses, suits, blouses 
and children's clothes. 
Women are enthusi- 
astic about it! "Indian 
Head" appeals to wom- 
an's love of beauty 
just as much as it does 
to her sense of wise 
economy. 

"Indian Head" makes 
your money go further 
and your clothes wear 
longer. 

Why buy linen at 50c 
when you can get all the 
beauty of linen and even 
better wearing quality at 
one-third the cost ? It will 
pay you to remember 

12V2C 



33 ■ ■. ■ ■■•>. ■ A Ik ■ ■ ■ ■■■■ ▲ ■■*'a. 

Ins. ■ ■ ^B ■ • ■ ,Mm ■ %■ ■ ■ ■ m^M. m / 

de ■ ■ ^a ■■# m » m ■ ^a ■ ■ ■■■■ m m •■#* 



25c 
a yard 



Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 

Use it instead of Linen 



when next you want a good-looking, splendid-wearing, white wash-fabric of handsome 
weave. Ttiere's almost no wear-out to it. Prove this to your own satisfaction. 
"Indian Head" can be procured in ready-to-wear clothes and dresses: — Look for the 
words "Indian Head" on the label. If hot at your dealer's we will help you obtain them. 
Another "Indian Head" superiority — it doesn't wrinkle easily. "Indian Head" stays 
fresh an unbelievably long time. You can easily wear it many times before it looks 
soiled. Right here is a big saving in your laundry bill. 

There is but one genuine "Indian Head"— and but one sure way to get it. There is 
one sure way to know it— every yard of real " Indian Head " has the name 
in dotted letters on the selvage^exactly as it appears on the border of this 
advertisement. Make sure "Indian Head" is on the selvage before you 
buy. Ask your dealer for it. Don't accept it unless it has " Indian Head " 
on the selvage. 

We'll Send You Material for a Doll's Dress. For three 2c stamps, 
we will send material for a doll's dress of "Indian Head," cut ready to sew, 
with directions. Scate whether for 14-, 16- or 18-inch doll. 



'.B 



xr)ory, dtonvijc 



CDept. 33, 48 FrankUn St. ^I-^^f^ 
©♦ Boston, Ma«». 




Reg.U.S.Pat.Off. 



INDIAN HEAD 



INDIAN HEAD 



^ 




They Say 

Mr. John Richards of the 

Royal Auto Club, London, said: 

tkc world all level." 



Boston Post. 7-9-16: - 
'H A L' car ittignti for 
driver*." 



dl 



Indianapolis News, 8-5-16: - 
"Famous ior its 'hold the 
road' quality." 

The Boston Herald. June 25. 
1916: 
"HAL TWELVE' ha» low 

upkeep." 

Washinglon Times, 7-29-IG: - 
"The Marvel of Molordom. " 

Jay Bersh says: — 
"Just like a rubber band." 

" I OS Angeles Times, Sept. 3, 
1916: - 

"Hew 'HAL TWELVE' a 
wonder." 

Jim Corbett says: — 
"1 know it't a good car, say 
anything you want to." 



The "HAL TWELVE" is built 
to be the best car made in America. 

The "HAL TWELVE" is long, 
low and light. The springs calcu- 
lated for the exact weight and 
length of the car produce luxurious 
riding qualities and safety. 

The simple body lines are not 
marred by unnecessary details. The 
refinements embody characteristics 
of the made-to-order car. 

The motor, a high-speed twelve, 
develops enough power to meet 
every existing condition. 

The "HAL" will out-demonstrate 
any car built. 

Six body designs, $2385 to $4250. 
THE HAL MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

870 EAST 72nd STREET, CLEVEUND. OHIO 

We are now printing a 
story of the car and the 
company — write for '" 




CHAPTEE X 

THE FIELD OF HANDLETTERING 

Because an advertisement is all or part hand- 
lettered is no guarantee that it is a good adver- 
tisement. 

Many all-type advertisements would be ma- 
terially improved by the use of several ''spots" 
of handlettering. And there are many advertise- 
ments whose message is materially weakened by 
the use of too much handlettering. 

The best field for handlettering is the hand- 
lettered advertisement to which I call attention in 
Chapter II, where I attempt to classify the vari- 
ous styles of advertisements for easy handling. 

Handlettering has a personality that is not pos- 
sible with tjTDe, yet a wise use of both often pro- 
duces the perfect advertisement. 

Where there is much space, little copy, and a 
desire for some peculiar character, nothing excels 
handlettering. With it, a good artist can convey 
both the message and its implied significance or 
character. 

209 




cu 

p.ow supreme- tKe joy of mak- 
^ ing Kappy one's friend -the t)ien 
aime'er-with a well- chosen Rift! 
Where does it find more beauti- 
£u\ expression than in the frad- 
rance Djer- Kiss, unrivaled dift of 
Gracious France ? So breathing 
rerined sincerity, so individuel ! 

'^l/red Ul <Jmitlx Cx>. Jofe. Ompcrlm Otltcjorf Gitj 

PERFUME FACE'^OWDER TALC 
SACHET TOILET WATER SOAP 



■^y^ 




""^lliS, 



fi 



Q- 



■'^t-.. - 




THE FIELD OF HANDLETTERING 211 

In addition to those shown in Chapter II we 
show here the Djer-Kiss page advertisement. 
Note the refinement and character so necessary to 
the product advertised. This example is near 
perfection. 

Arrow Collar advertisements are often hand- 
lettered in their entirety, — and who can mistake 
their cleanly atmosphere? But when an Arrow 
Collar advertisement has more to say than 
usual, no more than the usual amount of hand- 
lettering is employed, the rest is usually 
type. 

The La Preferencia advertisement and the 
Dobbs & Co. advertisement are both very good 
handlettered examples, but the Santa Fe is not; 
yet the Santa Fe advertisement is a blue ribbon 
winner as compared to some of the recent '' dif- 
ferent^* advertisements. 

If there is any one thing above another that 
should be remembered about handlettering, it is 
moderation. 

Where there is much reading matter, type is 
always best, unless there is an unusually large 
space to fill. Handlettering must have character 
and this character nearly always causes difficult 
reading w^hen there is much reading matter hand- 
lettered. 




RROW 

COLLARS 

THE new ARROW Satin 
Laundry Finish dupli- 
cates the appearance 
of the much sought hand- 
laundered fabric heretofore to 
be found in the highest cost 
Collars exclusively. 2 for 25c 

CLUETT, PEABODY & CO., Inc. 
Makers o/ ARROW SHIRTS, Trov, N. Y. 



ft. IPS. 



DobbsSCo 

Matters 

242Bf&AyeJ}etneen27)h&38tfiSMi 

DdbbsPifHi Avenoe Stxaw 

$3 

Split Straws* Leghotti^BffliHnif 
and Bankoks in ejcdusive 
3es at conect paces 




I Q] [D [D [D [D [D [D ID [D Q] E [D 
^eMostropular 

RENCIA 

Opecial Jnape 
tor \4caiion ueason 

Epicures'^ 



Coo/p /- 
UmoAe 



HAVANA AMERICAN CO..N. Y. 

IDDlIDIDIDIDttinilDnilDIDIlII 






B 



B 



CUtrpUt 

Winter 

ilifii" 




[omia 



V/hat you save m coal 
and "extra clothes bills 
and other necessities in 
theEast.wiUpay fora 
few months st^ in 

the sunshine and out-pf 

^ doors does away with 

ills and doctor bills 

Four daily California 

tt-ainswflf£/?e Santa fe . , 
-that includes the exclusively 
first-class California Limited 
then once a week in winter- 
the Extra fine-Extra fet-Eictra 
fare Santa Te de-Luxe. 

am/ the Grand Canyon of 
AriTona is on vpui- way. 
icUiiB folders tell 
trip. 



Our picture 

of trains and 



1087 Railway tuctiange Chicajo 







The Woman ^vho 
lived off a Bakeshop 




I HAVE made a discovery. Since I made 
it I have had twice as much fun out of my 
■cooking, and more pin money than ever 
before. 
For years, I lived off a bakeshop. Not liter- 
ally, of course, for I cooked all our everyday 
dishes, and sometimes cakes and pie. But I al- 
ways thought I couldn't create those daintier 
morsels that niftke all the differ- 
eiKLC between just feeding folks 
and giving them a real thrill when 
they sit down to the uble. I wasn't 
lazy. But I just said that such 
things as patty shells, fruit dump- 
lings and fancy cakes were beyond me. So when 
I wanted any real delicacy, I ran round the 
corner to the bakeshop and paid good money 
for it. 

It's one of those expensive habits that grow 
on you. I never realized how 
much it cost until suddenly wi 
moved out to this little town. 

One afternoon, soon after we 
came here, Jim telephoned "Tom 
IS coming out to dinner .tonight. 
Let's have some of those chicken patty things 
that he's so crazy about " Then suddenly I 
realized that there wasn't a decent bakeshop in 
town. I was helpless. I knew that if I tried 
to make pastry patty shells they would be like 
cardboard. I was almost reduced to tears when 
Ethel Bell, my new neighbor, 
dropped in. I told her. She said, 
"Why don't you make them out 
of Royal biscuit dough f" And 
then and there she put on my 
apron and showed me how. 





So I discovered Royal Baking 
Powder. That sounds foolish, be- 
cause, of course, I, had used Royal 
for biscuits and cakes ever since I 
was a child, just as my mother did. 
What I really discovered was that 
with Royal Baking Powder I could make all 
sorts of things that I thought I had to buy from 
a shop. 

Jim and Tom ivere delighted with the pat- 
ties. Next day when I told Ethel, she said, 
"Let's try some scones for tonight." Wo 
did, and Jim ate five. (Ten cents' worth at the 
bakeshop. ) 

Then I hunted up a Royal cook book, and 
cooked my way straight through it — cakes and 
buns, and wafHes and so on. Jim says that now 
I give him things that you couldn't buy from 
the finest pastry cook in Paris. 

The other day I sat down and figured up how 
much I used to spend in that bake- 
shop. It came to more than fifty 
cents a week. Enough in the 
course of several months to buy a 
party dress. (Jim says if I keep 
on feeding him so well I can have 
a party dress every month anyway.) 

Lots of women I know think they have to 
live near a bakeshop. Perhaps 
some of them would like to siye 
the money and get the fun that 
I have , out of my -discovery of 
Royal Baking Powder. 
So I am giving you here some 
of ihe recipes I use. There are dozen* 
more. 



ROYAL 

BAKING POWDER 

Five Royal Reapes for Women Who Have Depended on Bakeshops 



CHcken PatliM 



Ror&l CinnuBon Buaa 



Scaae* Nut Ban 



KOrxL PATTY S 






.u« a^o^h. toU out W iscb UoU 












THE FIELD OF HANDLETTERING 217 

Now and then a Forceful Educational style of 
advertisement can utilize handlettering for the 
heading or a panel in the copy, but not in the 
manner shown in the Comptometer advertise- 
ment. 

Here the heading and its significance as related 
to the illustration would have been much more 
forcible in bold type. As it stands it is not easily 
read and hasn't as much character as a bold type 
heading. 

It is simply a waste of money to have anything 
handlettered without a good and definite reason. 

Eemember this: Type faces of today are 95% 
simplicity, and unless you are seeking an unre- 
lated mass, use type. Don't buy handlettering 
unless you really need it and be sure that there is 
a reason for the amount you buy. 

Compare the Eoyal Baking Powder advertise- 
ment (which has a correct use of handlettering for 
the heading) with the Comptometer advertisement 
(which has not) . The heading in the Royal Baking 
Powder advertisement adds character, life and 
distinctiveness to the whole advertisement. It is 
well used. 

Recently I have seen some very well-handled 
small space advertisements that were 80% hand- 
lettered, but in nearly every case there were not 




fysis onYgur Figure Records 



In a recent address bearing upon the importance of a 
more intimate knowledge of cost accounting in business, 
Edward N. Hurley, Vice-Chairman of the Federal Trade 
Commission, said: 

*'The astonishing thing is that of the 250,000 
business corporations in this country, over 100,000 
have no net income whatever. In addition, 90,000 
make less than $5000 a year, while only 60,000 
remaining, the more successful ones, make $5000 
a year smd over.*' 

As long as the figure facts lie buried in your records, they throw 
no light upon the problem of successful business management. 

Turn on the spotlight and see what it is costing to make, handle 
and distribute your goods. 

If you are headed the wrong way, you want to know it in time. 



The figure facts you need can be se- 
cured with the Comptometer quickly 
and easily without burdensome cost. It 
puts within easy reach exact knowledge 
of the cost of each article produced or 
handled; expense by departments; by 
salesmen; by territory; comparative 
statements of gross and net profits month 
by month, or even week by week. 



If you have a good cost system, the 
labor and expense of operating it will 
be greatly lessened by the rapid work 
of the Comptometer. Because of its 
speed and reliable accuracy on all kinds 
of figure work, it is an indispensable 
factor in the accounting systems of 
many successful concerns in all lines 
of business. 




Would you like to talk to a Comptometer man 
about the application of the machine to your 
accounting work — its possibilities in time and labor- 
saving, the short cuts made possible by the instruc- 
tion service that goes with the machine? 

On your invitation, he will be glad to come and 
lay the facts before you for your consideration, 
without any obligation on your part. Further 
information by correspondence if desired. 

FELT & TARRANT MFG. CO. 
1723 North Paulina Street, Chicago, Illinoi* 



THE FIELD OF HANDLETTERING 219 

over four words and name and address in one 
such single column space. Notice the Back to 
Nature example and the Blaisdell Pencil example. 

Thus we see that the Handlettered style of 
advertisement, the Forceful Educational style and 
Small Space advertisements are all in line for 
using handlettering. 

Perhaps the best use for handlettering is for 
trade-marks, such as ''Colgate," ''Stewart," 
"Overland," "Dodge Brothers," etc. 

The distinction possible in the use of handlet- 
tering for trade-marks causes the style of the 
name to be as easily remembered as the name, 
and therefore makes substitution more difficult. 
Every product or service should have a distinctive 
name design. 

Compare the two "Willowcraft" advertise- 
ments. 

"Willowcraft" in type does not suggest any- 
thing special but "Willowcraft" handlettered 
suggests the whole story and instantly forces 
itself before the reader. Its shape and graceful 
swing defy oversight. Also notice that this name 
is the only handlettering in the advertisement. 

Now glance at the Salisbury Wheel advertise- 
ment. This is supposed to be all handlettering, 
and yet it is not handlettering at all. Handletter- 



Nofunnier bit of typical American humorhasever 
been written than this convulsing tale of two ama- 
teur sportsmen who go "back to nature" on a hunt- 
ing and fishing trip. It is a rare bit of refreshing and 
spontaneous humor enlivened by illustrations made 
by Newkirk himself, in astyleofdrawing that isaa 
original and entertaining as his literary method 

Thomas W. Lawson says It is: "Body-shaking, 
lung-tearing, side-splitting. ... I hystericked, rolled 
over the library rug, and in my awful gleeful con- 
tortions nearly rolled into the open grate." 

"I think you r book splend id . . . . You h ave a spon- 
taneous style that is admirable," says Walt Mason. 

"I sat last night and read your book and laughed 
and la£fed and larfed and ^liiff awed and got up and- 
yelled from pure joy. It is my idea of an unflawed 
gem."— George Fitch, 

Price 75c; postpaid 80c 
Fnnk & W«CB«Ib Co.. 354.60 Foorth Are.. New York 



/ 



don't want to whittle and fuss 
with wooden pencils. 
Let them follow the 
modern idea. 

Blaisdell Paper Pencil Co. 
Philadelphia 



B/aisde//?:^< 



Juat nick 
the paper 




The owners of both the most preten- 
tious homes and the modest bungalows 
select Willowcraft furniture because it is 
correct in every detail. The designs, 
workmanship and fine materials have 
combined to make Willowcraft the 
standard willow furniture of America. 

Send for our free catalog showing 175 patterns. 

THE WILLOWCRAFT SHOPS 

Box M. North Cambridge, Mass. 




Willowcraft 

There dse many kinds of willow fur- 
niture — iherels only one "WILLOW- 
CRAFT." It is so much better in 
material, design and construction that 
no comparison is possibly— one recog- 
nikes its thoroughbred appearartce at 
once. Its fine lines, workmanship and 
durability stamp "WILLOW- 
CRAFT" as wonderfully different 
from the cheaply constructed kinds 
which are found at stores generally. 

Our catalog suggeaU 1 75 attractive pattern: 
Soul for it to-dau 

THE WILLOWCRAFT SHOPS 
Box G North Cambridge. Mass. 






AXJjBiS WHBBIjS 
TRANS?lISSIOlS\S 



'UAMEaTOWN. N.Y. 



THE FIELD OF HANDLETTERING 223 

ing must have a certain amount of uniformity, 
grace, character and harmony to come under the 
correct heading. 

Of course this advertisement is different, but it 
does not suggest axles, wheels or transmissions. 
It is just a mass of drawn words. This was orig- 
inally an eighth page in trade papers. 

The type of handlettering used for the ^^Back to 
Nature" book advertisement is very well chosen 
as a medium of strong and unique display and is 
unusually good for small space. Its irregularity 
commands and vaguely suggests the comic. 

An intelligent piece of handlettering is not an 
easy thing to find, and we must make sure that the 
few words that we do use are openly handled and 
easy to read. For instance, notice the heading of 
the Southern Cypress Manufacturing Association. 
Here type would have been far superior and more 
economical from every standpoint. 

Ever so often, the type foundries bring out a 
face of type which makes an effort to look like 
handlettering, and some of the faces are so well 
done as to cause advertisement builders many 
puzzling moments and ofttimes a wrong guess. 

The Simonson advertisement is set in Pen Text 
and, while it may be *^ different, '* it has the same 
failing as an all handlettered advertisement — il- 



fev4^^^^ 











ppO*^ 



|9^W1i€ll ptumini • llmuion. • But<i 
■^ F»r»n. k SI««>in«-Porch or jost » F»i 
tyutrKP/TEsSvo. ft(;/LP HUT OH 



'Short Cuts to Good Carpentry"- 

( Vol.26.CypressPocket Library) 

48 pages of authoritative in- 
struction (simple, clear and 
stimulating) fully illustrated 
and with big: Supplement, 24 
X 35 in. with detailed Work- 
ing- Drawings that show 
how to make twelve"hard 
jobs" eacj , safe and ecch 
nomical of both labor 
and Lumber. Read what 
"Rural Life." (Roches- 
ter, N Y.) says ot 

"SHORT CUTS to 
GOOD CARPENTRY" 

" It is a guide book for 
^'^vS^ the man or boy who 
can handle a saw 
r^^'^^v or hammer and 
""J^^^^v wants to know 
"v^I-qSv how to use 
x^^X them to 
the best 
advan- 
tage." 
Ten 
topics 
pertain- 
ingtothe 
house and 4 
about bams. 
Sent free with 
our compliments. 

WE TRUST YOUR 

OWN JUDGMENT 

nd SELF-INTEREST to 

INSURE CYPRESS on YOUR joh. 
The Wood Eternal" keeps values 
going up by keeping the place from 
running down." 



CYPf^^ 




o'/^ci. ■' TRY IT. 



our "AIX BOUND BEXPS DEPAHTMENT" h.lp VOU. Oor rCTourcn .r« at rour Mrvic. ».Ui n.li.bU O 

SOUTHERN CYPRESS MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION 



HIBERNIA BANK BUILDING. NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



CYfRJaiS AT YOUK LOCAl. 



IF UE HASN'T IT. LET US KMOW UIMSDIATSLY. 



s^^ 



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226 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

legibility. Pen Text, however, is good for a few 
words only or possibly a trade-mark. 

This Pen Text face, like hundreds of freak faces, 
is just a fad and is taken up by a class of adver- 
tising men who are always trying out the latest 
thing in type regardless of where it is used and 
what it is used for. They like to hear some say 
that it is such a ^ ' different ' ' advertisement. How- 
ever, when fads overshadow the message, the mes- 
sage suffers and the fad dies — nearly always. 

I could show dozens of faddish, freakish faces 
of type, but as I cannot find a reason for them in 
advertisement building, you will not find many in 
this book. 

Man is interested in man, and handlettering if 
well handled is unusually interesting because of 
its human touch, but handlettering is very risky 
and requires much careful thought before using. 
When in doubt, don't. 



CHAPTEE XI 

WHITE SPACE AND MARGINS 

Advektising men are oftentimes deluged with 
admonition to use more white space to make an 
advertisement distinctive. White space, like 
nearly every other good point in building an ad- 
vertisement, can be overdone or half done. It is 
one of the most difficult things that an advertise- 
ment builder has to handle. And margins, being 
a form of white space, are a close second as diffi- 
culties to be encountered in the physical make-up 
of an advertisement. 

The Gregory Seed advertisement shows an ex- 
cellent use of white space as an attention pro- 
ducer, and while the margins on each side of the 
body matter are a trifle wide, they are correct in 
relation to the border used and the amount of 
white space used in the entire advertisement. We 
must never forget that as an attention producer 
white space has but few equals, provided it is 
properly handled. 

We must strive to make the message the thing. 

227 



iiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

I A Wonderful | 

I Offer- 

S The Gregory cataldg for 1916 is out. A 

= handsome, helpful 82-page book.- It 

= marks our 60th year as growers of Honest 

S Seeds. Your copy is ready. Send for it 

= to-day. Take advantage of the cul 

S tural helps it ofi[ers— the result oPour 

S 60 years' experience. Select from our 

S many unexcelled varieties— truth 

= fully illustrated and described. 

= They are grown on our own farms, 

S and under expert direction. 

= Grow Gregory's Honest Seeds 

= in your garden this yea."-— 

S plant Gregory's 

1 Wonderful $1 Collection 

= an unusual offer to celebrate our 

= 60th Anniversary. Comprises 26 

— varieties of choicest vegetables, 

= and 6 beautiful, easy-grown annual flowers. 

= In all 32 full-size packets for $1.00 postpaid/ 

= Yield sufficient for summer and winter use 

= of an average family. Crops, if sold, would 

= bring $15 to $25. With the collection we 

= give free a Garden Blue Print, with direc- 

= tions — to help lay out the plot. 

= Whatever your needs in garden, field or 

= flower seeds, it will pay you to select from 

= our Anniversary catalog. Send for it today 

= — then order early 

= A sample of 

= what the $1 

= collection 

^ yields 




J. J, H. Gregory 
& Son. 

620 Elm Street 

Marblehead, Mass. 





"Heatproof" 



Our new "Heatproof" com- 
pression riveter dies are all that 
their name implies. They can 
be used continuously without 
cooling, and when worn, can be 
recupped without any heat treat- 
ment whatever. They save 
time. 

We positively guarantee them 
not to split, and ship on ap- 
proval. If you are interested in 
increased shop efficiency, send 
in your riveter die specifications. 

Qeq F MaRCHAMT 

1422 So. Rockwell St., CHICAGO 



The first timepiece ever made exclusively for 
automobiles is the Waltham. Two mainsprings 
render it immune to vibration. 

Waltham Watch Gimpany, Waltham, MaM. 



Uakers of the famous Wallham •Riverside" WaUhes 



WHITE SPACE AND MARGINS 231 

We must use white space as an aid, not as a whole 
reason for the advertisement. 

The Geo. F. Marchant advertisement is an ex- 
ample of what I consider excellent use of white 
space. This advertisement is well balanced. The 
reader sees the product connected with a strong 
and interesting heading and the whole make-up 
is one that would be hard to miss wherever placed. 

Compare this with the Waltham Watch adver- 
tisement. In the Waltham copy the message and 
appearance would have been more interesting if 
the type had been at least 14 point instead of 
8 point and the amount of white space reduced to 
at least one-half. The Waltham Watch advertise- 
ment overdoes the use of w^hite space. 

It might be said that there was too much white 
space in the Arrow Collar advertisement shown 
on page 212, but I am of the opinion that this white 
space as here used produces attention that will 
certainly rest on the name of the goods just be- 
low the white space. I consider this one of the 
best Arrow advertisements and an excellent use 
of white space as a means of gaining attention. 

The Pond's Vanishing Cream advertisement 
uses white space to excellent advantage. This 
method of setting the body matter to one side 
makes for a freedom that gives distinction to the 




Take Every Precaution 

Avoid sunburn and tanning; 
they not only discolor the skin but 
toughen it and make the pores 
coarse. 

Protect your skin and it will not 
burn half so readily. 

Never use a cold cream or grease 
preparation before exposure to the 
sun. 

NOT A COLD CREAM 

Pond's Vanishing Cream offers 
just the protection the skin needs. 
It is not a cold cream — it contains 
absolutely no grease. 

The substance used as its base 
is recommended by scientists as un- 
surpassed for preventing roughen- 
ing and sunburn. Use Pond's Van- 
ishing Cream^ freely. You will find 
it improves the clearness and healthy 
tone of your complexion; that it im- 
parts a most refreshing sensation of 
coolness and softness. You need 

Ponds (omp'iny. 
Vanishing Cream 

A free sample tube on request, or 
send 4c for large trial size, enough for 
two weeks. Made by the makers, of 

POND'S EXTRACT 

the universal lotion for cuts, bniisea and 
bums — a household necessity in every 
American home. Send 4c for trial bottle. 
PONDS EXTRACT CO., 148 Hudson St.. 
New York. 

Al»<) Talcum. CoU Cream, Tooth Paste and Soap 



WHITE SPACE AND MARGINS 233 

advertisement when placed so that the white space 
comes next to a column of reading matter. In 
the case of the Pond's advertisement, it was not 
properly placed as it appeared. 

A heavy border requires a wide margin between 
type and border in order to relieve the effect. I 
usually work on the idea that bold body type 
(and I seldom use bold body type) requires twice 
the amount of marginal white space as ordinary 
body type. I do not believe that there can be any 
set rule as to how much space should be left for 
margin between border and ordinary body type. 
It depends on the weight of the border and the size 
of the type. On small advertisements in expensive 
magazines I have used with effect as little as four- 
points between a 1-point rule and the 5-point 
type. 

My idea is to have the margin just, so wide that 
the copy does not look cramped and hard to read. 
I try to get the margin just wide enough so the 
reader's eyes will not ''butt'' into the border when 
reading from the end of one line back to the be- 
ginning of the next. 

The Thermos advertisement has used proper 
margins. Some advertisement builders might say 
that they were a trifle too wide, but when you con- 
sider the heavy outside rule of the border, I be- 




FOR THE OLD FOLKS 



npHE problem of the selection of 
-■- the handsomest and most useful 
Christmas gift is happily solved by 

THERMOS 

For Thermos serves you right — 
food or drink — hot or cold — when, 
where, and as you like. 

Every member of the family, every 
one on the list of friendship, from 
infancy to old age — either in the hours 
spent at or away from home — have 
innumerable daily uses for Thermos. 

Thermos brings to them in the hot 
summer months all the comforts pro- 
duced'by ice, and in the cold winter 
season all the joys to be obtained by fire. 

In buying Thermos for "him" or 
her" as your Christmas gift, you 
are selecting the invention honored 
with the Grand Prize by the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition; and by like Ex- 
positions at Berlin,. Paris, Antwerp, 
Madrid, Seattle.Vienna, and London. 



Thermos in great assortment awaits 
you at any one of 100,000 dealers. 
If you live in the country ask that 
it be sent postpaid. From $1.00 
up. Send for booklet. 

American Thermos Bottle Co. 

Norwich, Conn. 




A Small, Individual Kawneer Store Front 

X-ou will «r«n< th.t ih. tt,<.u..na. o( KAWNEER STORE FRONT 

.uccc»e> »r<:n-t h.pp.n.t.nce.: luck ha. not played a bi4 part. When 
Merchant, in all kind, of bu.inc.c. and working under all .ar*. o< con- 
dition., have mad. money on new KAWNEER STORE FRONTS, do 
you think your ca.e i. exceptional? Do you belie^■e your condition ia 
.och that the proper kind o£ KAWNEER FRONT would not iocrea.e 
your profita? 

Xo.t. money «o put in a KAWNEER STORE FRONT." True, and 
it take, the profit on many over-the-counter .ale., but ii it U < mean, of 
makin« more money, ian't it a practical inveatment? 

Store Fronta of the crudert kind co.t money, in fatct there i. little dif- 
ference in the co.t of .uch Fronta and bright, clean-cut and attractive 
KAWNEER STORE FRONTS. The ultimate re.ult — the oltimate 
profit— ia what you are iotere.ted in; not merely the initial co.t. 



'Suf "i^i't K^ w n e e p ;r;;'ra"'.*°to':: 

w.U.n« becau.e .t I V StORF FRONTS * l- _ ., -, =n . j j:.:_. ., 






^ ^_^ Storefronts- him $12.30 addiu. 

How many extra .ale. would your new KAWNEER 

STORE FRONT have to create to make that $12.50 each month? How 
lon« would it Uke your KAWNEER STORE FRONT to actually pay 
for it.elf? 

One Shoe dealer paid for hi. new KAWNEER STORE FRONT in 

ei«htmontha (40% increa.e in bu.ioe..). Another paid up in Jive month. 

-another in ten month.. There are thou.and. of KAWNEER FRONTS 

that have paid for themaelve. in le.. than one yeai— both ia little town. 

d big citie*. 



I. your. 


an EXCEPTIONAL Store? 

Book of Store Front Ideas 




5* that we may be of fir.t help to you in your con.iderafion of a new 
Store Front we have compiled and publi.hed "Boo.tinS Bu.ine.. No. 12." 
It i. a book of authentic idea, on Store Front. - idea, that 30.000 Mer- 
chant, have developed in their adoption of KAWNEER STORE 
FRONTS. It contain, photograph, and drawing, of big and little Store 
Front. — .ome of the be.t-payinj in the country - and other information 
that will intereat you. It contain, information that you will need when 
you come to put in a new Store Front to increa.e your bu.ine... 


Don-tri 
kind when 
ioformaUoc 


k the amount of money it take, to put in a Store Front of any 1 
a mere reque.t for •Boo.tin* Bu.ine.. No. 12" will live you ■ 
that wiU .ave and make you mooe. ■ 


Send today — your copy i. waiting for you. 






Kawneer 




>tanuracturing Company 

Factories: Francis J. Plym, President 
NUea. Mich. DepL K. 1203 NortK Front Street 
SanFr.nci.co. NILES. MICHIGAN 
Toronto. Can. Home Off.ce. 


We Have 
a Branch 
Near You 



THAT clean, long filler is • 
great comfort. It means 
that as you smoke your mild 
Tom Moore you will never 
draw imall tobacco threds 
•long with the smoke. 

In addition it enables our 
Skilled cigar makers to shap» 
for you the handsomest cigar 
that IQc can buy. 

The next time' you buy 
Tom Moores» ask particularly 
lor the "Monarch" size. 




'TpM Moore 

CIGAR lO* 

Little Tom 5* 



WHITE SPACE AND MARGINS 237 

lieve that you will agree that these Thermos mar- 
gins are nearly perfect. Compare the Kawneer 
advertisement with the Thermos advertisement. 
This Kawneer copy illustrates clearly what I 
mean by having the reader's eye *'butf into the 
border by every attempt to follow from the end 
of one line to the beginning of the next. Three 
times the present margins of the Kawneer adver- 
tisement would materially improve the appearance 
of this advertisement. The type could be better 
chosen and the headline should be in two lines 
and much larger. This advertisement shows what 
often happens when we get away from clean-cut 
body type and leave the choice of sizes and mar- 
gins to some compositors in average print shops. 

There must be good balance in every advertise- 
ment if it is to be and look consistent at first 
glance. If the white space is not balanced it is 
not well used. The reader will notice the blank- 
ness rather than the message. 

The Tom Moore Cigar advertisement has a 
heavy border but there is a third too much white 
space used. Notice the weak and washy appear- 
ance of this advertisement. The white space over- 
balances the border and type matter. The dark 
border, trade name and cut demand that the en- 
tire composition be kept reasonably dark in gen- 




The Severest Test 
of a Coffee 



is after ' dinner coffee. The 
rich essence — undiluted — is 
sipped leisurely and its flavor 
is tnore noticeable. 

To have this important detail 
of your dinners an unusual 
success, serve Yuban, the Ar- 
buckle Guest Coffee. 

Yuban is the coffee the great- 
est coffee merchants in the 
world have for many years 
offered their guests. 



TOOTH decay usually 
begins on the sides of the 
teeth or in the crevices 
of the grinding surfaces. This 
fact indicates that the tooth 
brush does not thoroughly 
clean all surfaces of the teeth. 
It also indicates that some- 
thing more than mere brushing 
is necessary to prevent decay. 





Listerine can reach every 
exposed surface of the teeth 
because it is liquid. Lister- 
ine, as a mouthwash-dentifrice, 
insures mouth-cleanliness in 
its highest possible degree. 

Brush the teeth with Listerine ; 
then thoroughly rinse the 
mouth and the spaces between 
the teeth with diluted Lister- 
ine. This is an efficient and 
pleasant, yet scientific way of 
preserving the teeth. 

Ask for Listerine in 
the original bottle and be 
assured of the genuine 
by the appearance of the 
package— round bottle — 
brown wrapper. 

Four Sizes: 15c, 25c. 50c, $1 
Manufactured only by 

Lambert Pharmacal 
Company 

St. Louis, Mo. Toronto, Can. 



UO TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

eral effect. It loses its sturdy effect when too 
much white space is used. 

The Yuban Coffee advertisement is, to my mind, 
as good an example of every point of display as 
ever came to my attention, when you consider that 
this is a four-inch single column newspaper ad- 
vertisement. 

The handling of trade name, package cut and 
white space in the Listerine advertisement, while 
not new, is decidedly effective and well done. It 
is suggestive of many excellent things in white 
space and margins as used in advertisement dis- 
play. 



CHAPTER XII 

WHAT IS EMPHASIS AND WHAT IS NOT 

Opinions differ as to the efficiency of empha- 
sized words in the body part of an advertisement. 
Some writers of advertising copy emphasize about 
one-third of their copy. Others use no emphasis 
except the headings. 

I believe that it is sometimes necessary to add 
force and attention to certain words, but I have 
always maintained that the fewer the emphasized 
words the better the effect. 

A logical well-written advertisement which has 
a real message to deliver does not need bold type, 
does not need underscored words in order to be 
convincing. It is its own best excuse for living. 

It is a fact that if an advertisement has a real 
forceful heading, which tells a vital story to the 
man who needs the product, this man will read the 
entire advertisement and remember its points 
without any screaming underlined or bold words 
scattered through the advertisement. 

An advertisement that has the larger part set in 
bold type is harder to read than an advertisement 

241 



Fabric is to your Tire 
what Structural Steel 
is to a Building 

If you have believed that your mileage 
depends mostly upon the rubber in the ' 
tire, disabuse your mind at once eind 
save yourself trouble and money. 
Cotton fabric is the vital part of & tire. "When 
Miller engineers achieved the epocheJ success 
of reinforcirtif the basic structure of tires thru 
preserving the natural oegetable wax and oil in the 
cx>tton fibre they gave to motorists an improve- 
ment £is great as the development of steel 
construction for sky scrapers. 

The Structural Fabric in 

ItlUlerE^fTtr^s 

Carrie* the Load and Strain Just as Steel 
Beams and Girders do in the Slcy Scraper. 

A tire's fabric is as incomplete without its natural veg- 
etable wax and oil eis a steel structure ia without its rivets. 

And just as it requires a multitude of rivets to bind 
together the entire building, so must the fabric have its 
wax and oil retained just as Miller preserves all of it 

Heat is required to vulcanize tires. The secret and 
exclusive Miller Method of vulcanizing at a low degree 
of heat, cures thoroughly but does not bum the 
strength-giving lubricants out of the fabric. 

This same wonderful Miller Method also retains all the 
primitive endurance and toughness in the rubber and 
prevents its deterioration during »vulcanization. 
But, unfortunately, all tires look very much alike. 

There is one safe way — insist on a Miller Geared- 
to-the-Road Tire and then you know it has not 
been worn out during manufacture. 

Your car demands tires . that are equal to the dual task 
imposed upon them by car and the road. Miller tires 
come from the factory mtad — hum-full of mile muscle, 
of vigor, power and slarhina. They come to you with all 
the qualities that give you long and sustained mileage. 

THE MILLER RUBBER CO.,Abon,U.S.A. 

DEALERS AtiD r>ISTiUBUTORS EVERYWHERE 

Mmjadarm tf c rnmfkk IUk of Dnial^' Suniria. P/jofclora' <mJ HcafUal SiiuJla. 




This year plant a 
Ready-tO'Grow 
Seedtape Garden 

Lay the tape in the furrow and cover 
it up. That's alL Ki even fertilized!. 

No more trying to sprinkle individual, 
teedi evenly and regularly along • row.. 
No more diesome meuuriag. No tedious 
hours bending over, thinning out, ! 
or displacing roots o( healthy plants. 



(B^ter Quality Seeds) 

consists o( clean, carefully selected 
garden seed of prize>winning 
strains, properly spaced in a thin paper- 
tape, fertilized with fish glue. The fertilized 
tape acts as a wick drawing the ground- 
moisture, thus assuring early germina-' 
tion and healthier plant fife. 

Seedtape stands for highest quality seeds 
as well as simple planting. Seedtape Vege- 
tables come in 40-foot strips selling at I Oc, 
Seedtape Flowers in 10-foot strips selling 
at 5c 

Mosl goodslora which usually sell 
seed are now selling Seedtape, If 
your dealer carmoi supply you We 
will gladly fill your orders direct 
Ready 'To 'Grow Seedtape Gar- 
dens afford you the knowledge and 
experience of a board of gardening 
authoritie*. You get the beat vari- 
etie* of each flower and vegetable 
and in just the quantities needed. 

eo SfitMf Codeo-CooiK 20 bant o< S«kw< 
wuh hai diiMuei f o> ■««»< pludav. ud <U(u J 
nuxU audeaa lo nUe the Bid <4 rx •nikUc ■««. 
Aucli the a>upcm bdow ID nw o>d<> oclou- S2.I»4S 
wc wOl mdiidc S hil-nc puW. oi Sa2tai;fl»na, wilk 

*1 Saadup* C«td«n-C<«u» 10 boui d Snfaoe 

witk hiU diieaiaii lo •acamm (luoaii ud il liiiii d 
■Dodd Kideu. AsKk tlK CDWn lidcw B rm ctita a> - 
cloon. SJ K«i « wiU^hA2(»UHa. p«U«oi << SeaJ. 

OR,. SM<lupeC*^(Un-St»ckwadSc«kw«no<«n 

f OC (f„|| ^,1 ,^ t, ]9ib sck^fHuSw-ha 

ducctMU for lucceaive pUotiov Aad dcnga. toe Bodd »nk^ 
1 (\f. SoedUpt Cudcn-I hilMj*. 404oet box of 
I UC ruUifan with the 1B16 SeodUpo eotolovao. 



Counlj/ A/enU Wanted Thwugkoul the U. S. 

AMERICAN SEEDTAPE COMPANY 

SSli Woolwonh Bids., N<* York 



WHAT IS EMPHASIS AND WHAT IS NOT 248 

that has no bold lines whatever. The best adver- 
tisements in my collection are almost without ex- 
ception those that have the fewest bold lines. 

I have always contended that profuse emphasis 
is an acknowledgment of weakness in copy. Nine 
times in ten an over-emphasized advertisement 
denotes the work of an inexperienced advertise- 
ment builder or is the work of a successful busi- 
ness man whose knowledge of advertisement con- 
struction is limited. 

Some business men's idea of a strong forceful 
advertisement is one set entirely in bold type with 
underscored headings. I once knew a business 
man who set the policy for a considerable amount 
of advertising, ordering that the boldest tjY>e 
made should be used in every piece of his com- 
pany's advertising. His idea was that the bolder 
the type the easier it would be to see and read. 

Again, over-emphasis makes the advertisement 
spotty and causes the eye to jump from one em- 
phasized word to another without getting any 
connected or related thought. 

Look at the Miller Tires advertisement. It con- 
tains almost every known method of emphasiz- 
ing advertisement copy. There is light-faced un- 
derscored, light-faced italic underscored, bold, 
bold italic and bold italic underscored. 



I! i i 



0tl^.p 



Put pai'p^f insurance on your dwelling- 
house— your barn — your silo — all farm buildings. 
Use Lucas Paint. It will pay premiums in fonger life, 
better protection, higher market value, -better appearance. 

^MGmm PmiMm 

—Purposely Made For Every Purpose— 

are made to uniform standard — the highest. You can 
always rely on Lucas long-wear working quality — 
real economy. 67 years of paint-making repuution in every 
can. Lucai Paint covers doubU tlie spaceof cheap ' 'mixed'* 
paint. It vpithstands the storms. Send (or important 
bulletin "Save Money on Paint" which tells how. 

Office 2S0,. Philadelphia, Pa. 



WHAT IS EMPHASIS AND WHAT IS NOT 245 

What is the result? A real message to motor- 
ists is made a confusing mass. It is the best ex- 
ample I know of to prove that all emphasis is no 
emphasis. 

The Seedtape advertisement has no underscore 
rules, but it contains a mixture of light-faced, 
light-faced italic, and bold-faced and bold-faced 
italic, all of varying sizes. Is this advertisement 
easy to read? Can you find any pleasure in hav- 
ing one bold part demanding attention over an- 
other bold part? 

I believe that there is enough interest in the 
name Seedtape, connected with the picture, to 
cause any likely prospect to read every word with- 
out trying to force it all out of the advertisement 
in one eyeful. 

If we must emphasize parts of an advertise- 
ment, let us do it as shown in the Lucas Paint 
advertisement. Use an italic letter of the same 
tone of color (and of the same family of type, 
where possible) for all emphasized w^ords. Then 
the reader does not have a few meaningless words 
glaring at him the minute the advertisement comes 
within reach of his eye. Yet the voice is raised 
(so to speak) when the reader comes across the 
emphasis in the advertisement. 

The emphasized words mean nothing at first 



I To the JVoman | 

I who is proud of | 

I her laundry work | 

I XTO DOUBT you | 

I -*-^ think it neces- ^ 

^ sary to rub and boil § 

^ clothes to make them ^ 

p sweet and clean. A |^ 

^ million women, as p 

^ particular as you, ^ 

% used to think so too. ^ 

^ Now they know ^ 

I there is one oth-er ^ 

^ way to secure the ^ 

P same results without ^ 

% the old-fashioned ^ 

^ drudgery. They tned ^ 

I P.andG.— The White f 

I Naphtha Soap. | 

j| If you would try ^ 

I P.ANDa— The White I 

^ Naphtha Soap you ^ 

^ too would find that ^ 



without your doing 



\ any hard rubbing or ^ 
b boiling it washes b 
^ clothes as sweet and p 



clean as you want ^ 

I 
i 



I *^^^"^- i 



I P.ANDG.-The White | 

w Naphtha Soap is 

^ made to satisfy wo- 

^ men who would not ^ 

^ think of using a ^ 

^ labor-saving soap un- ^ 

# less its standa.rd of ^' 

^ work were as high as ^ 

^ theirs. ^ 

i So long as this White ^ 

<| Naphtha Soap saves ^ 

^ time and labor with- ^. 

% out any sacrifice in ^ 

1^ the quality of work ^ 

^ should not you use it ^' 

|:^ for washing clothes |j 

m and for all general p 

% cleaning? ^ 



WHAT IS EMPHASIS AND WHAT IS NOT 247 

glance without what precedes and what follows 
this emphasis. Do not force the reader to read 
the emphasized parts of the advertisement with- 
out first reading up to the emphasis. An adver- 
tisement spotted with bold or underlined words 
alw^ays reminds me of a crowd in which one-fourth 
of the people are trying to speak at once, with 
the result that you cannot hear any. There is no 
concentration of display. 

The Lucas Paint advertisement obtains empha- 
sis without injuring the display of the advertise- 
ment and proves that both good display and good 
emphasis can lie down together. This advertise- 
ment is undoubtedly the work of a master. 

Also note the effect of the italic word ''alone'* 
in the Packard advertisement shown under ''The 
Classification of Type Faces. '* (Page 62.) 

The P. and G. White Naphtha Soap is spotty, 
but this spotty effect is not very serious. The 
spots reiterate the name. If the eye starts to 
jump over the advertisement, as it will, the reader 
has the name well impressed before reaching the 
last spot. 

You will observe here the difference in sales 
message between these related P and G spots and 
the unrelated, disconnected spots in the Miller 
Tires advertisement. 



M8 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

The study of emphasis is of no small impor- 
tance, but remember this: — Get all the emphasis 
that you wish so long as the emphasized portion 
does not overshadow the rest of the reading mat- 
ter in the advertisement. This can be best ac- 
complished by the use of an italic face of the 
same tone as the rest of the reading matter. Cast 
out all idea of underscored words or bold words 
used in light-faced body type. 



CHAPTER XIII 

STRIKING EFFECTS 

There is a growing belief among many adver- 
tisement builders that the Forceful Educational 
of one series and the Passive Educational style 
of advertisements are the logical styles and the 
ones most likely to dominate among the advertise- 
ments of the future. 

If the message in the advertisement is vital, it 
will be read and believed without any freaky or 
shrieky arrangement. 

While I am of the opinion that the plain Passive 
Educational style is usually effective and produces 
a more pleasing and wholesome appearance, I am 
also of the opinion that the majority of adver- 
tisements must be unusual and striking in make- 
up to get attention. 

Practically all of the plain Passive Educational 
advertisements occupy half or full pages and, for 
this reason, they do not have to compete with 
nearby advertisements to get attention. Their 
size and treatment with a reasonably interesting 
heading or illustration practically command at- 
tention. 

249 




Get this point ! 

You can't break the pencil 
point in a Stewart sharpener. 

It's the first of its kind — an effi- 
cient, durable, needed tool. See it 
in your dealer's window. Test it 
in your office — home — school. 

Made by J. K. Stewart Manufacturing 
Company, of Chicago, and sold at aU 
dealers — or direct from factory — for 

$3.50 



STRIKING EFFECTS 251 

It is seldom possible to get maximum attention 
in small space with the Passive Educational style. 
The Eastman Kodak advertisement ''Your friends 
can buy anything you can give them except your 
photograph^' is one of the very rare occasions 
where such a style is effectively used in small 
space. The main feature of this advertisement, 
however, is the use of white space, and white space 
properly used is an effective display feature in 
any size or style of advertisement. 

As an example of white space as an effective 
medium, I show the Stewart Pencil Sharpener ad- 
vertisement. The reading matter is practically 
the Passive Educational style in connection with a 
strong dominating illustration. The adaptation of 
copy, headline and product in this Stewart ad- 
vertisement is as nearly perfect as I have seen. 
The well-balanced white space in this advertise- 
ment shows excellent planning. Whether this 
advertisement is used in small or large space it 
is bound to be seen. 

The H-0 advertisement is also a good example 
of the use of white space and is the kind that is 
hard to bury or skip. The copy and illustration 
of this advertisement do not have a close connec- 
tion. As there is no mention of unending supply, 
large output, etc., in the copy, it would have been 





•s, 

I 



.9-5 

IK 

lis 

ill 



i rf 



^ 9, 




24 S?^* 

^ .S -o « 

§isS 

£ -c .S rt 

5 «9 ^ *-« 

mil 

-a 8||5 



as 4 

^^ 

E 



STRIKING EFFECTS 253 

better to show but one package in the upper left- 
hand corner and show this larger — twice as large 
as the largest package in the present illustration. 
This would have made identification easier. 

The Emerson Player-Piano advertisement is a 
very strong poster style small space advertise- 
ment, which uses white space to a very good ad- 
vantage. 

This style is very adaptable. Where there is 
much copy a fine line border the size of the panel 
can be used and the copy can be set, inside the rules 
in regulation style. 

Another style of w^hite space use is shown in 
the United Steel Company. This is a very general 
style but the rules in this particular advertise- 
ment are too heavy. The use of a cut of the hand- 
written second display adds force and character to 
this example. 

One of my first lessons in getting attention in 
advertisements was to break lines through rules 
and borders, and I suppose most advertisement 
builders have used this style. 

In all my files I have no better example of 
broken rules than the Flex-a-tile advertisement. 
This is made entirely by the printer, and is an 
excellent example of the possibilities of printers' 
rules, type and cooperation. The design, the copy 



Chrome 



VANADIUM 



Steel 



Adaptable for those parts 
requiring exception a,l 
strength with light weight. 
Have you tried it out? 



I 



QAjiy£i^ ^ (njuuj2/xft£AjLem^jir 



We have spent some years 
developing the quality of our 
Chrome Vanadium Steel un- 
til now it is used by the 
largest industrial plants in 
this and foreign countries. 

Our 

is made under our own se- 
cret process, patents for 
which are now pending. 

Drop us a line today concerning 
your '• Breakaye " or " Com- 
plaint " troubles. We will 
gladly offer you gratis our ex- 
perience. 



The United Steel Company, Canton, Ohio 



BRANCHES— New York 



Chicago Detroit 



Cincinixati 



Say "Good-bye" 
to shingle trouble 



^ a-til 




Rot, rust and unsight- 
liness simply can*t 
happen if you use Flex- 
a-tile Asphalt Shingles. You 
use fewer shingles and you 
can lay them right over old 
roof boards — weather and 
water-proof; fire-resisting. 



FLEX-A-TILE 

Asphalt Shingles 

give such splendid satisfaction 
because they are made to do 
it. We use a high-quality 
wool felt base and a rubbery, 
special asphalt coating. The 
outer finish of slate or granite 
is compressed under tons of 
pressure. The beautiful, 
natural colors of these mineral sur- 
facings are permanent and get richer 
with age. In red, garnet, greenish 
gray, emerald and brown. 

Write for handsome Flex-a-Tlle 
book and specimen shingles. 

THE HEPPES CO 

Mfri. alto of Flex-a- Tile Asphalt 
Shingle*, Asphalt Roofing in any 
Finish and Utility Wall Board. 

lOlS Krall Ave.. Chicago. III. 




Make 
Money 
Pulling 
Stumps ! 



Clear your neighbors' land Your 
Herculea will be kept busy when 
' othera see what It does. Big Dro&tn 

(or you With the 
II 1 All-Steel 

rlPrnilP^ Triple Power 
IIC1CU1C9 Sluip Puller. 
you can clear an acre a dav The krujivn 
and proved stump puller all over the 
civilized world very easy lo op*ratr - 
(tremely durabh-. Special introduc 
tory price. 30 days' trial offer. ■' 
uarantee. on 
late ordera Write for 
big Free book of land 
clearing facts. 

HERCULES MFG.CO 
123-23rd St. 
CtoUni&t, 
low* \^ 




New Crop, Iowa Grown, Recleaned 

V^J-jV/ Y l-ji\ Inspected 

Medium Red. Mammoth. .Msike. Allalia and 
Sweei Clover of choicest quality 



Tl lV^r\TlJV Blue Cr»M. etc.. M low pfic«» 
UlVlUlni NOW u tke time to B 

\flk for samples and copy of our Special 
Red Ink Price Li-^t Large illu,.i rated 
Catalog of Seed FREE 

IOWA SEED COMPANY 
Dept. 7 Deg Moines, Iowa 



Pork Sausage from 
Forest Home Farm 

Uad« after aa old Tlrylalft redp* from 
the cbolc«*t portion* of tender yearling 
plg>, flavored with home frowo herbi and 
pure epicee. Put up lo 1 lb. packages, 
wrapped In parchment and (hipped In 
6. 10. 20 and 50 lb. bozM. 

Price 30c a pound 

DeUvared at year daer 

Forest Home Fann Hams 

From corn-fed yearling pl(i. cured by an 
old-faahioned Southern proceta that make* 
them deliciously tender and tasty They 
weieb from 8 to IS lbs. and keep Indefinitely 
Pric* 30e > ftai t. : i. PveeOrilU 
Freight paid on orders of loo lb}, or over 

Forett Home Fwa, ParcellviUe, Va. 



iiniiiiiwtiii 




STRIKING EFFECTS 257 

and the product are all well related and the effect 
is striking but quickly suggestive. There is per- 
haps too much of the broken effect in the design 
which could have been remedied by the use of 
smaller type for the firm name and holding this in- 
side the lower part of the rules. 

While not classed as the broken-rule style, the 
Forest Home Farm advertisement is a good sug- 
gestion for getting attention in small space. It 
also proves that it is not necessary to show the 
entire product in an illustration. In another ad- 
vertisement this same advertiser uses the rest 
of the pig on the other side of the panel. In both 
cases it is the white space that gets the attention, 
while the illustration and heading tell the story 
quickly. 

The idea of all striking and irregular effects is 
to tell the story quickly and be sure of "getting it 
over. ' ' 

When an advertisement builder is given small 
space or a difficult problem, he must use every 
ounce of energy to make sure that the advertise- 
ment cannot be missed, and when seen cannot be 
misunderstood. 

One of the ''old reliables" in tlie mind of every 
advertisement builder is the circle. Pages being 
at right angles, space being at right angles, type 



Did you ever enjoy such large, hand- 
some Strawberries as these— picked 
right from your own garden? 

Allen's True -To -Name Berries 

are just as good as they look— good clear to the 
center. If you have any garden space at all, grow 
them and you'll never regret it. If you are a 
farmer, orchardist or poultrynian devote a few 
acres to Strawberries. You'll find them the best- 
paying crop. There's always a demand for 
berries, always good prices. You'll have plenty 
for your table, too. We have 185 acres in Straw- 
berries, and 80 acres in Blackberries, Raspberries, 
etc., the result of 30 years' experience. All plants 
packed fresh for shipment. 

Send for our free 48-page 191 6 Book of Berries— 
12 plates in natural colors— tells of the many 
varieties— how to select, plant, etc. Send for your 
copy now and plan to grow big-paying small fruit; 

The'W. F. Allen Co 

90 Market Street 
Salisbury, Md. 



STRIKING EFFECTS 259 

and printers' materials being at right angles and 
the average reader's customary habit of seeing 
things at right angles make a circular design al- 
ways noticeable. 

When used with a good illustration and a strong 
well-related headline, as is the case in The W. F. 
Allen Company advertisement, the copy is almost 
sure to be read. 

However, the display does not tell that the ad- 
vertiser is selling the plants and not the berries 
themselves. The display line in the body of the 
advertisement should read ''Allen's True-to-Name 
Strawberry Plants." 

I also show another circular advertisement — 
The Starr & Keed Cigarettes. Here I do not see 
anything but the circle nor get any message from 
the entire advertisement. An illustration of some 
kind is needed to back up the circle after the at- 
tention has been obtained. 

Any design or display that does not carry the 
reader's mind beyond the design and on to the 
message, is not good. All attractive advertise- 
ments are not convincing. Too much attention is 
given to some freakish design, and not enough 
attention to getting the real message across so 
forcefully that the design will either be forgotten 
or remembered only as a means of adding force. 




Starr & Reed "%\ 

EGYPTIAN CIGARETTES ^v 

llli'' ^k 

'//// THEY are genuinely flch In flavor, ^^\\\ 

/// / ^^^ "^* heary; delightfully mellow, \\\\\' 

ff|//' yet not insipid; pleasingly fragrant, yet not r.ili 

I' ill pungent. Altogether, this is the ideal ciga* j'l| 

'mU rette. created by the Master Blender from vlU} 

the finest Turkish tobaccos that are ''^^// 
produced. 

Take a long, deep whiff. The rich, 
mellow, fragrant smoke will 



1 



4 




STRIKING EFFECTS 261 

One of the most effective agencies of display is 
an outline or suggestion of the package or goods 
advertised or something closely related to tha 
goods or the headline of the advertisement. I 

The Kansas City Electric Light Company igj 
not selling electric light globes, neither is the; 
Hercules Mfg. Co. selling stumps, but the articles} 
for sale in these advertisements are so closely re^i 
lated to the display that the reader gets the mes-? 
sage and its meaning at first glance. And the- 
first glance is obtained by the irregularity of the 
design. 

'*How Many Hides Has a Cow?" AVe do not 
know. But the query is more interesting than 
the same question surrounded by an ordinary rule 
border. 

Although the shape of the Pompeian Olive Oil 
package is not much different from any other olive 
oil package, this advertisement with its two views 
of the package is wholly and truly a Pompeian 
Olive Oil advertisement. It is just irregular 
enough to avoid being buried on a page. The il- 
lustration does not consume much more space 
than would be consumed by a commonplace rule 
border. 

The Gulden *s Mustard advertisement is another 
good adaptation of this idea ; it might have been 



How Many Hides Has a Cow? 

This may seem a foolish question. 

Yet the area of automobile upholstery made from one cow's 
hide is about three times that of the whole hide. 

How? . . . J 

By splitting the hide into three sheets, and coatmg and em- 
bossing the "splits" in imitation of grain leather. 

Coated split leather is therefore artificial leather much inferior to 



X UU HUNT R\ 
J^RIKOlii^ 



MOTOR 

QUALITY 



which is scientifically made artificial leather based on a fabric much stronger 
and more uniform than the fleshy spUt. but coated and embossed in the same 

"^^The difference is all in favor of Fabrikoid. which is guaranteed superior to 
any coated split. Not affected by water, heat or cold, ^veral leading makers • 
have adopted it. Any maker can furnish on your car if you order it so. 

Send 50c for sample 18 x 25 Inches. Enough 
to cover a ch^lr seat. Mention this msgazlne 
and specify Black Motor Quality Fabrikoid. 

DU PONT FABRIKOID COMPANY 
WILMINGTON, DEL. TORONTO, ONT. 



STRIKING EFFECTS 263 

better without the line background, but I use it 
here to show another possibility along the line of 
pictures of the packages. 

Lines at angles of 45"" seldom fail to attract 
attention. The advertisements of the National 
Fire Proofing Company and the Monroe Phar- 
macal Company both use this idea to good ad- 
vantage. These advertisements are surely irregu- 
lar in shape and you cannot bury an irregularly 
shaped advertisement. 

The Iowa Seed Company advertisement is also 
irregular but it is not suggestive of clover seed. 
And I doubt that any casual reader will recognize 
immediately that the outline is that of the State 
of Iowa. The irregular shape gets attention but 
the second glance does not give the story as ef- 
fectively as does the Pompeian Olive Oil adver- 
tisement and others. 

You cannot mistake what the Crescent Brass 
and Pin Co. are trying to sell. And I would not 
say that this advertisement was purely irregular 
in shape. There are many products with short 
names and even many short and terse trade names 
that could copy this style with good effect. 

Advertisements do not have to be irregular in 
shape to produce a striking effect. They can be 
distinctive in illustration and display. 




When You Want Olive 

Oil That's Pure and Fine 

Say-"POMPEIAN" 

Since we eliminated Glass Bottles, five 
years ago, we havfe never had a com- 
plaint on Pompeian Olive Oil. It's 
made from CHOICE Mediterranean 
Olives — the " first-pressing," — and 
it's Pure and Sweet, with a Distinctive 
"Fruity" Flavor. The Pompeian Pack- 
age is sealed, — Air-tight, and Light- 
proof. It keeps in all the Goodness. 

Half pints 25c Pints 50c 

FUU. MEASURE GUARANTEED BY US 

FREE — 16 -page book of Tempting 
Salad -Recipes. Ask your dealer for 
it or write us. 

POMPEIAN CO., Inc.. 
Wiuhinffton. D. C. 




Fabric 
First 



This M ihe logical way to plan 
'suit or gown. Choose first the 
cloth, which is the style founda- 
tion and on which depends the 
finished effect. Choose from the 
wealth of beautiful weaves and 
colorings in 



STRIKIXG EFFECTS S67 

The illustration and border in the *' Fabric 
Firsf advertisement is decidedly distinctive and 
still in close relation to the product. 

I cannot believe that this effect was produced 
by the customary use of the Ben Day method. I 
am inclined to think that the drawing was made 
over a very clear photograph of the goods itself. 
This method may lend a valuable suggestion to 
other clothing advertisers because it actually puts 
the clothes on the subject in the illustration. Such 
a treatment is as sure to cause the reader to look 
twice as it is possible to make a sale of cloth by 
causing the buyer to feel the goods. The reader 
can almost feel the goods in this advertisement. 
The heading and copy of this advertisement are 
unusually well connected. 

Many products lend themselves to backgrounds 
for the advertisement and this method is weH 
worth serious study. 

There are some products, however, that can- 
not be forced into the method of treatment. Note 
the Carborundum advertisement. Very few read- 
ers have the patience or eyesight necessary to dis- 
cover and follow the reading matter. It is a 
striking effect but it is not good by any means. 
I use it here to illustrate something to be 
avoided. 








' ofSthejAcai^ a f^ 
SARBORl^DUM im^^^P^to| 

-a solid sha^j^of G«^^uftcfeft^t&i©^^c^^^1 
^ _r fitted wit}t^'iefi^lii^^4tegni^'"<^od^^a]e'^ 
^^-%i|: better and Quicker tftanme^ofd-^^teis^or - 
€ ^gi\m%'jfkti-n edge. ^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^'' ^ ^\ ' ^^^ ^^^ * 

I'*,''' Make jjlad tlie man a^J'*^'^ nln«e1f~^i4^1m"'a^^^ 
p ^orunuum Rizor Strop Sr fei*^l|xife'Hoftt,* Gratil^H^ 
"^.sportsman wtlH^a Carhjttmduaj Sport-'mstR's S^ft|— ^%\mII {^^ 
^^5i%?^lgC-.-ion hts luintssg 'lift vet', hacKdsr *!&,', in a Jt^i^iiE^' 

^'^^ hinde -,cfla»lt:«e m '.J4, ?; - . ' ^' '& • / •^,-'^- »I-<^P^ 

No. 7SA— O.'ijori^ltew j^L-^te. Sr)arp<-^f^-»s|dS*i'J, «^*©^n t«ndV, ji ^ 

g. Slf,cf»»h finaa of C-«4ioT»R%B 3>&«p?*^.i 
£:P^o "^-13A - CsHwi/i 

'\' -Cvrb&m Ann n i^t tno 

ae&lcrs—QfWiSi 



^ The C^bbruadu)^ 
Company 





STRIKING EFFECTS 0^9 

Reproducing a clipping of comments on the 
favorable mention of an article offers great possi- 
bilities. I reproduce one as the last exhibit in 
this chapter. It is excellent arrangement, but I 
think the name of the book advertised should have 
been put across the top. The arrangement is, how- 
ever, most interesting. 



CHAPTER XIV 

ADDING LIFE TO PACKAGE DISPLAY 

Advektiseks now realize bow important it is to 
have the reader see and remember the package. 
If readers do not get a clean-cut idea of just what 
they are going to be given when they ask for the 
advertised article, substitution will be an easy 
matter. 

The problem of package display is therefore a 
serious one and it becomes more serious when we 
realize that it is only in rare cases that an illus- 
tration of the package in its real colors is possi- 
ble in the advertisement. We must do something 
striking in black and white. 

If the reader is an experienced builder of ad- 
vertisements, he can readily visualize how far 
short even the best black and white reproductions 
of packages come toward giving an adequate idea 
of the package itself. 

Modern builders of advertisements, however, 
are becoming more and more efficient in the hand- 
ling of package display, and this chapter was 
called into existence merely to show and record 

271 



ADDING LIFE TO PACKAGE DISPLAY 273 

some of the things that have been accomplished 
along this line. 

Pep-0-Mint Life Savers, Smith Brothers Cough 
Drops and Nabisco Wafers all show a similar 
method of putting life and action into the dis- 
play. 

This method makes possible a showing of the 
goods as well as the package. The reader has two 
chances of comparing what he buys with what he 
called for. 

While this method has the appearance of being 
easy to handle, it is by no means simple. The 
hand of a master and the patience of Job are 
required to get the wafers or the drops in just 
the right position and focus in order to prevent 
a strained or stilted atmosphere. They must be 
natural and the freedom and ease of any natural 
effect is difficult to obtain. 

Some advertisers are using motion picture 
cameras to obtain '' natural '^ photographs. They 
get the model, or machine, or package in front of 
the camera and have them act as natural as pos- 
sible as long as possible and in the meantime 
the camera is recording every move. In some 
few of these movements the subject is nearly al- 
ways sure to get all the natural ease, action and 
grace required. 



ADDING LIFE TO PACKAGE DISPLAY 275 

In the old days most packages were drawn or 
photographed ^'straight fronf view. There was 
very little perspective to any and not much variety. 

The Ryzon Baking Powder package shows how 
much action and character can be given a pack- 
age in just the posing and perspective alone. The 
package ^^ comes to'' the reader at once. Because 
the shape of a package is right angles is no rea- 
son why it should or must be shown at right 
angles. Eight angles in illustrations that must 
be shown with type (which is at right angles), 
usually produce a very flat * * squared up ' ' picture 
with no especial force or character. 

Some goods have an inside cover and an out- 
side cover, but until the recent Nujol campaign, 
the author does not remember seeing both covers 
shown in one advertisement. 

This is an excellent idea because it also gives 
the reader two chances for comparison. In these 
days of substitution evils, we cannot feature too 
many points of identification. 

Dioxogen, Listerine and Colgate's Shaving 
Stick show other methods of adding life to the 
display of the package. 

Such touches as those given these last three 
packages can lift a package out of the page and 
make it individual and distinctive. 



In the heart of America's 
most famous vineyards 
on the sunny shores of 
Lake Keuka. New York. 

GoldSeal 

CHAMPAGNE 

IS made from selected 
grapes by the most skilled 
vintners. Fermented in 
the bottle and carefully 
aged and pronounced by 
connoisseurs to be superior 
to any wine you can buy. 

SPECIAL DRY «nd BRUT 

Insist on Having It 

GOLD SEAL RED— the best 

Sparkling Burgundy on 

the Market 

Sold Everywhere 






ADDING LIFE TO PACKAGE DISPLAY 277 

The use of the Gold Seal Champagne bottle 
makes an attractive, compelling display but I 
do not see that it is any dit^erent from other cham- 
pagne bottles. It does not help toward identifica- 
tion. Its chief value is display. 

These few samples of package display are not 
meant to be a full list of all the attractive pack- 
age illustrations. They do, however, show that 
more thought is being given to this all important 
feature of an advertisement. They also give a 
hint as to the possibilities of concentrated thought 
on this subject. 

There is no reason why any illustration of a 
package of goods should be flat and lifeless. The 
reason some are now inane is due to lack of 
imagination and originality. 

Some of my readers will say that shadows and 
perspective tend to cause a more difficult recogni- 
tion of the package when purchased. Perhaps this 
is true to a certain extent. However, w^hen the 
shadows or perspective cause the reader to look 
twice, I believe the shadow is forgotten and the 
name and general outline of the package itself 
more easily recognized. Average intelligence for- 
gets the shadow after being drawn by it to the 
package. 



CHAPTER XV 

CONCLUSION 

This book was not intended to cover every de- 
tail of printing as related to the work of an ad- 
vertisement builder, advertising manager or ad- 
vertiser. It was intended to be an exposition of 
the building of mechanical elements to produce an 
advertisement as near perfect in sales appearance 
as possible. 

Neither is this book intended to cover the field 
of printing in general. The author believes how- 
ever that it contains many valuable helps to print- 
ers as well as advertising men. 

Type as related to building books, building 
magazines, commercial printing, booklets, cata- 
logues and direct-by-mail circulars is an inexhaus- 
tible study. 

Volumes could be written on the subject of 
paper stocks and their application to booklets, 
circulars, catalogues, house organs, mail cards^ 
etc. 

Printing inks and color harmony is another in- 

279 



280 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

teresting- and voluminous subject. All of which 
come into the daily work of advertising men and 
some advertisers. 

This book, however, deals with one subject, one 
part of the advertising man's or advertiser's work 
— Building Advertisements That Pay 

The author does not believe that the arranging 
of advertisements in groups and puttihg them on 
a scientific basis for easy recognition will create a 
tendency to sameness in current advertising. But 
lie does hope that it will act as a chart to help the 
imagination of the advertisement builder to build 
more clearly, more easily and more economically. 

The author does not believe that the classifica- 
tion of type faces will cause monotony in the body 
of advertisements. He rather believes it the sur- 
est manner to cause a further development in the 
proper use of type faces as a means of selling 
goods. 

The study of this classification should help to- 
ward an easier adaptation and application of new 
type faces which appear from time to time. Style 
changes, but as long as advertising is so closely 
related to human nature a basic scientific prin- 
ciple of construction changes very little. 

Some advertisements are pleasing to the eye; 
some are repellent ; some are neither pleasing nor 



CONCLUSION 281 

repellent. But we cannot judge the selling power 
of an advertisement by its beauty or lack of 
beauty. 

The main questions are these — is the type face 
chosen best adapted; are the engravings in the 
advertisement proper; do they blend or contrast 
with the type as the case may require ; do the en- 
graving and type as a whole conform to the kind 
of advertisement determined by the plan ; are all 
the mechanical points in the advertisement care- 
fully selected so the message will reach the ulti- 
mate consumer and sell him the article or service, 
quickly, easily and surely? 

Test out every advertisement. 

Is the plan right! Is the style of advertisement 
right ? Are the type and engravings best adapted 
to this style! Is the style of advertisement too 
much style and not, enough message? 

After you have tested your principles you can 
then add what I like to call *^ millinery.'^ 

For instance : All your principles may be cor- 
rect and yet the advertisement will not be distinc- 
tive. In the chapter ^^ Striking Displays^' I 
show only a few methods for lifting an adver- 
tisement above the ordinary. This chapter has 
by no means exhausted the subject. 

Perhaps the ^' millinery'^ may take the form of 



282 TYPOGRAPHY OF ADVERTISEMENTS 

distinctive environment — something suggested to 
help create character. Look to your border. 

Maybe you need handlettering to suggest age 
or distinction in connection with your message. 

You may want ^^ something different'' and yet 
wish to retain your principles intact. How about 
the engravings? 

A code of principles of construction based on 
sound selling-sense is absolutely necessary for the 
economical handling of the mechanical features of 
an advertisement. 

It will help both the advertising men and the 
printing fraternity. 

I have tried to define these principles. I have 
put into this book the result of years of research 
and experience. I have made an effort to help my 
fellow laborers in advertisement building where- 
•ever they may be. 

(I)